Delivery in 1 week - Fiberglass RV


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Old 06-28-2015, 07:00 AM   #1
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Name: William
Trailer: Casita SD17
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Delivery in 1 week

In 1 week, my Casita (17ft SD) will be delivered to a friend's house. It will stay in their driveway for about 2 weeks while I figure out how everything works. Is it possible to run a power cord from their house out to the Casita to provide some electrical power?

I have also read about some electrical surge-protectors of various types, and I have no idea which to get. Some are $50, some are $350. When I get to a campground and plug in to their 30 amp service, I want to know the Casita will not get fried. Is it safest to just get the most expensive one?

I have A-Z User Manual from LoveMyCasita, so I am trying to use that until I get the actual user manual.
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Old 06-28-2015, 07:46 AM   #2
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From the years we have been RVing and what I have heard over that time, we do not and would not run the AC unless plugged into the 30 AMP power. If you decide to do this anyway, I would call and talk with the people at Casita about doing it.

I liked this article because it really is good: http://www.hrvc.com/console/files/Un...l%20System.pdf

I am sure some people will say that it will be just fine but for your own peace of mind, read the article to get an understanding of how complicated the issue is.

And, congratulations on getting your Casita and many happy days ahead with it!
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Old 06-28-2015, 08:04 AM   #3
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Name: Gordon
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The manual for my AC says it requires a 20 amp circuit / breaker.. that is what is wired in the pop-up and what is used when plugged into 30 amp service. You could also run a 20 amp cord to a 20 amp outlet (but not a standard 15 amp house circuit) to have the same effect. Many have run the "20 amp circuit" AC units on 15 amp house circuit with no obvious damage, however they might have suffered hidden damage to the compressor (the most expensive part to replace) or they might have a sudden failure if they continue to do so.

As for everything else, yes you should be OK running the lights, pump, fridge, etc. on household current (15 amp).. all you need is an inexpensive adapter. It likely will come with the trailer, if not.. Wally World, Camping World, etc. It should be covered in the manual, or if you were going to pick it up in person instead of delivery.. this is something that dealers typical go over with new owners. If you use a electric heater and also everything else is turned on you might draw too much power, Just keep the total load under 15 amps unless you have upgraded wiring (some people go so far as add 30 amp service for their rigs, but that could cost $500-1000).

(PS, the article Cathy linked to explains it better than I ever good)

As for surge protectors, and like devices.. they are insurance. I never used one in the last ten times I went camping (with electric service) and I had no problems. However I am positive that if I continued to not use one, I would have a problem sooner or later. It could even be deadly.

I am considering this hardwired unit (to be added to by trailer). Many people use the portable versions.. anything from Progressive Industries should be good quaility, you get more protection or features if you pay more.
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Old 06-28-2015, 10:18 AM   #4
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Name: Arnold
Trailer: 2015 Casita 17' Spirit Deluxe
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One week, lucky you. We still have 2 month to wait. I can't give you any answers to your questions but I can say enjoy, enjoy, enjoy and I'll see you out there somewhere.
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Old 06-28-2015, 11:25 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whoot View Post
In 1 week, my Casita (17ft SD) will be delivered to a friend's house. It will stay in their driveway for about 2 weeks while I figure out how everything works. Is it possible to run a power cord from their house out to the Casita to provide some electrical power?

I have also read about some electrical surge-protectors of various types, and I have no idea which to get. Some are $50, some are $350. When I get to a campground and plug in to their 30 amp service, I want to know the Casita will not get fried. Is it safest to just get the most expensive one?

I have A-Z User Manual from LoveMyCasita, so I am trying to use that until I get the actual user manual.
An ordinary twenty amp outlet will do just fine,if your cord reaches it and you use a common adapter. If you need more reach then be sure and get an extension cord with 12GA wire and insulation designed for outdoor use. You could even buy a 30A extension cord which would be best, but they are a bit pricey and you will still want the adapters for times when needed.
My experience is that most prudent small travel trailer owners carry an ordinary extension cord as described above.
Campgrounds usually only have 30A or 50A prices. The 30A pole will usually have 20A outlets as well to accommodate those with that cord.

Your Casita has breakers onboard to protect the wiring.
I haven't used surge protectors in my Travel Trailer and have not suffered any loss in my decades of travel.

You can buy a simple device to check the shore power before plugging in if you like although most people don't find it necessary.

You don't mention if your trailer will have A/C or a microwave or other high draw devices. Mine does have A/C, Microwave, icemaker, water pumps , etc.








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Old 06-28-2015, 11:51 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by floyd View Post
An ordinary twenty amp outlet will do just fine,if your cord reaches it and you use a common adapter. If you need more reach then be sure and get an extension cord with 12GA wire and insulation designed for outdoor use...
Actually, to be technical, most of the adapters in use are rated at 15 amps so of if you do plug it into a 20 amp circuit, and then draw 15-20 amps, you are pushing your luck. It might be fine or (if you draw just under the max from the 20 amp circuit before the breaker trips), it might melt or damage the adapter. If it starts to get more than just a little warm, you have exceeded it's capacity.

The second adapter listed above is to convert a standard RV 30 amp style plug to a 20 amp circuit and receptacle. That will work fine up to 20 amps, but we should mention the difference between the receptacles for 20 and 15 amps...

A 20 amp plug and receptacle will have a tab on the side of one of the prongs. Other than that, they look the same. A 15 amp plug will therefore fit into a 20 amp circuit and the plug and cord, if rated at 15 amps, becomes the weak point. A 20 amp cord and plug (with tab) will not fit into a 15 amp receptacle.


Most homes have few if any 20 amp outlets.. I had one put in special in my garage, and after 20 years added a second. Both are supposed to be dedicated to special uses but I can use them for the RV if done right.

BTW, if I were to think I had a 20 amp outlet, I would make sure that a 20 amp breaker controls it too.

The required extension cord depends on both amp draw and length. Longer cords need to be thicker (smaller gauge). So YMMV. There are a number of references online you can check.

If you just keep you draw under 15 amps, and use a proper extension cord if needed, you don't have to worry about hooking up the trailer to your house current. the Kill-a-watt device, or similar, is one way to see how much current you are using. Since it is only rated to 15 amps, turn on stuff one at a time to measure, turn on more one at a time.. watch the draw stays under 15.

Any more questions just ask.. there is MUCH knowledge on this forum and not too much misinformation.
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Old 06-28-2015, 12:07 PM   #7
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Trailer: Escape 17B Sold 5/2016
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By all means have a surge protector installed, it's cheap insurance for the expensive electrical system in your Casita. You can have an electrical surge not only in a campground but also at home.
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Old 06-28-2015, 12:25 PM   #8
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The surge protector saved us twice on a recent trip from Canada to Texas. Had to reset power both times, but it's much easier to push a button than it is to replace electrical components. Definitely get one.


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Old 06-28-2015, 12:45 PM   #9
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Name: William
Trailer: Casita SD17
New Jersey
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Originally Posted by rbryan View Post
The surge protector saved us twice on a recent trip from Canada to Texas. Had to reset power both times, but it's much easier to push a button than it is to replace electrical components. Definitely get one.


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Which one should I get?
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Old 06-28-2015, 01:11 PM   #10
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Name: William
Trailer: Casita SD17
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Originally Posted by gordon2 View Post
Actually, to be technical, most of the adapters in use are rated at 15 amps so of if you do plug it into a 20 amp circuit, and then draw 15-20 amps, you are pushing your luck. It might be fine or (if you draw just under the max from the 20 amp circuit before the breaker trips), it might melt or damage the adapter. If it starts to get more than just a little warm, you have exceeded it's capacity.

The second adapter listed above is to convert a standard RV 30 amp style plug to a 20 amp circuit and receptacle. That will work fine up to 20 amps, but we should mention the difference between the receptacles for 20 and 15 amps...

A 20 amp plug and receptacle will have a tab on the side of one of the prongs. Other than that, they look the same. A 15 amp plug will therefore fit into a 20 amp circuit and the plug and cord, if rated at 15 amps, becomes the weak point. A 20 amp cord and plug (with tab) will not fit into a 15 amp receptacle.


Most homes have few if any 20 amp outlets.. I had one put in special in my garage, and after 20 years added a second. Both are supposed to be dedicated to special uses but I can use them for the RV if done right.

BTW, if I were to think I had a 20 amp outlet, I would make sure that a 20 amp breaker controls it too.

The required extension cord depends on both amp draw and length. Longer cords need to be thicker (smaller gauge). So YMMV. There are a number of references online you can check.

If you just keep you draw under 15 amps, and use a proper extension cord if needed, you don't have to worry about hooking up the trailer to your house current. the Kill-a-watt device, or similar, is one way to see how much current you are using. Since it is only rated to 15 amps, turn on stuff one at a time to measure, turn on more one at a time.. watch the draw stays under 15.

Any more questions just ask.. there is MUCH knowledge on this forum and not too much misinformation.
I have A/C and a microwave, but I can leave them off.

So I should plug the Casita in to the Killawatt, and plug the Killawatt in to the house's power, using a 15amp cord if the house has a 15 amp electrical, with everything turned off - then turn on each thing except the A/C and Microwave?

Should I run things off the Casita's battery, then recharge the battery using the house electricity? (as opposed to leaving it plugged in to the house all day).

When I am not there, I plan to disconnect all power between the trailer and their house.

Or maybe I should get a small generator?

Is there an easy to install solar panel? I could get a solar panel, and lay it on top of the Casita while I am parked.
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Old 06-28-2015, 01:13 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by whoot View Post
Which one should I get?

Since you don't have one hard wired, an inexpensive solution is a dogbone type like this one:

http://tweetys.com/30-amp---portable...ty-tester.aspx



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Old 06-28-2015, 01:20 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by gordon2 View Post
Actually, to be technical, most of the adapters in use are rated at 15 amps so of if you do plug it into a 20 amp circuit, and then draw 15-20 amps, you are pushing your luck. It might be fine or (if you draw just under the max from the 20 amp circuit before the breaker trips), it might melt or damage the adapter. If it starts to get more than just a little warm, you have exceeded it's capacity.

The second adapter listed above is to convert a standard RV 30 amp style plug to a 20 amp circuit and receptacle. That will work fine up to 20 amps, but we should mention the difference between the receptacles for 20 and 15 amps...

A 20 amp plug and receptacle will have a tab on the side of one of the prongs. Other than that, they look the same. A 15 amp plug will therefore fit into a 20 amp circuit and the plug and cord, if rated at 15 amps, becomes the weak point. A 20 amp cord and plug (with tab) will not fit into a 15 amp receptacle.


Most homes have few if any 20 amp outlets.. I had one put in special in my garage, and after 20 years added a second. Both are supposed to be dedicated to special uses but I can use them for the RV if done right.

BTW, if I were to think I had a 20 amp outlet, I would make sure that a 20 amp breaker controls it too.

The required extension cord depends on both amp draw and length. Longer cords need to be thicker (smaller gauge). So YMMV. There are a number of references online you can check.

If you just keep you draw under 15 amps, and use a proper extension cord if needed, you don't have to worry about hooking up the trailer to your house current. the Kill-a-watt device, or similar, is one way to see how much current you are using. Since it is only rated to 15 amps, turn on stuff one at a time to measure, turn on more one at a time.. watch the draw stays under 15.

Any more questions just ask.. there is MUCH knowledge on this forum and not too much misinformation.
I almost didn't post above for this reason!
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Old 06-28-2015, 01:25 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rbryan View Post
Since you don't have one hard wired, an inexpensive solution is a dogbone type like this one:

Progressive Industries 30 Amp Portable Surge Protector from tweetys.com



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Wow! I didn't realize they could be that expensive. Maybe you could go for a cheaper one first then take the Casita to a reputable RV dealer to have a permanent one installed, (that would be my preference). There should be no need to unplug your trailer, it draws very little power and with a surge protector you should be able to leave it plugged in 24/7.
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Old 06-28-2015, 01:31 PM   #14
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So far as solar panels go, why not wait before you make that decision? Do some camping off grid, or at least not plugged in, and find out if you actually need solar. If you use A/C or a microwave you'll definitely need to be plugged in, or a decent generator, so there'd be no need for the solar.
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