Flexible or rigid for offroad use. (78 Scamp trailer) - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 04-30-2006, 10:51 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
Coach George Jessup's Avatar
 
Trailer: Scamp
Posts: 358
Send a message via MSN to Coach George Jessup
Quote:
Not many 'Mogs in North America - is that what the Scamp is going on, in place of the radiobox?
Yes, but I will probably scavange from the bottom of the radiobox the attachment system. Basically two central pivot points that allow tortional twist of the chassis's ladder frame without effecting the box. The pivots are for and aft mounted to the box and pivot points are on the frame. Full body mogs have a simular pivots just more of them I think.

Quote:
I think a roof rack can still be supported rigidly by the internal frame, if (for instance) each support were a bolt passing through a rubber grommet to seal and isolate the shell. If the structure really is rigid, so that it would not move and crack the fiberglass, then through-bolting through plates sounds good to me. They'll likely be curved...
This was my thoughts. Kill two birds with one stone. Roll cage and roof rack. The tubes run from original metal frame underneath thru the floor then on up thru the interior then thru the roof. Each thru area is a place where the cage acually can be seperated. (each thru spot has sandwhich plates)

Quote:
A Boler apparently called the Skimp has an extensive external rack. Not for me, but an interesting structure, ... I think the idea is that it is supported by the frame front and back, independent of the body.
Yeah saw that one already. I did my last Jeep that way. External cage/roof rack. This is still an option but like you say.... it is kinda Ugly. One of the newer Expedition Mogs and the Rally Mogs are like this. Most have the cage only on the cab with the camper box having it's own roof rack mounted to its top.
Attached Thumbnails
chrome.jpg  
__________________

__________________
Coach George Jessup is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2006, 08:25 AM   #16
Suz
Senior Member
 
Suz's Avatar
 
Trailer: 1989 Casita Spirit Deluxe
Posts: 2,055
Registry
Perhaps our trailers are referred to as "eggs" more because of how they are made, rather than their shapes.

An eggshell is strong enough to hold up under the pressure of a hen sitting on it because of the way the pressure is applied. However, we all know that it doesn't take much to crack or even break one.

In other words, it really doesn't matter how you shore up the inside, it all depends on how and where the pressure/strikes come from the outside.

Make sense?
__________________

__________________
Suz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2006, 09:19 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
Coach George Jessup's Avatar
 
Trailer: Scamp
Posts: 358
Send a message via MSN to Coach George Jessup
Quote:
...Make sense?
Makes perfect sense. This is why I'm thinking more and more that flexible is better when it comes to the punch factor. Still Roll Cage though for occupant safety.
__________________
Coach George Jessup is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2006, 12:45 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Roger H's Avatar
 
Name: Roger
Trailer: Y2K6 Born Free 32RQ on the Kodiak chassis, 1995 Coachmen 19' B-van and 1996 Precision 21' Sailboat
Iowa
Posts: 5,000
Quote:
Makes perfect sense. This is why I'm thinking more and more that flexible is better when it comes to the punch factor. Still Roll Cage though for occupant safety.
George, I think what we're all trying to tell you is that it doesn't really make any difference. Any hit that the glass takes is going to hole it. You can, in fact, press on a large panel and watch it flex. If you really want to know how fragile your shell is before you go to the trouble of mounting it on your Mog, take a claw hammer and give it a smack on one of the corners of the trailer. Not really hard, just what you'd expect a 4" tree branch would do at, oh say, crawling speed. Frederick's tear from just a battery sliding into the glass is pretty good indication of how little it takes to hole the material these are made out of.

Then commence repairs and see if it's something you're willing to do regularly.

I'm an old-time jeep rock crawler and I've creased my fair share of fenders and body parts. I'm reasonably conversant in the kinds of places you're proposing to take yours. I'm really concerned that you think that these glass bodies are more resilient than they are and you're going to go to a bunch of work to do something that may not work.

Frankly, were it me planning your project, I'd be looking at something out of 1/4" plate aluminum panels, or fiberglass vacuum composite walls with aluminum framing... something a little more stout than a fiberglass trailer shell.

Now, if after all that, you still choose to go forward, you may be the first in line to tell me I don't have a clue, and point to your success to prove it!

Good luck!
Roger
__________________
Roger H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2006, 01:00 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
Coach George Jessup's Avatar
 
Trailer: Scamp
Posts: 358
Send a message via MSN to Coach George Jessup
Quote:
...think what we're all trying to tell you is that it doesn't really make any difference. Any hit that the glass takes is going to hole it. ...want to know how fragile your shell is before you go to the trouble of mounting it on your Mog, take a claw hammer and give it a smack ...
Good luck!
Roger
Thanx Roger. Some Pretest Smacks are a GREAT idea. I got the trailer now so Imma sorta STUCK with making due the best I can, out of what I got. Ill try some different smacks under different conditions for experement saks (with Rhino lining on outside. W/R Lining on in and out, W/ extra layer of glass, etc. etc and see what I can come up with. Wish I could have found a cheaper one to experement with.

Thanx for all yall's feed back.

PS- Glad to hear from a Jeeper. Sold my well used and ABUSED TJ ( MTR's, Atlas II, 356's in axles, etc etc) a few years back.
__________________
Coach George Jessup is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2006, 07:44 AM   #20
Member
 
Trailer: No Trailer Yet
Posts: 52
Quote:
....snip....
PS- Glad to hear from a Jeeper. Sold my well used and ABUSED TJ ( MTR's, Atlas II, 356's in axles, etc etc) a few years back.
With that kind of Jeep build, you should have a strong background understanding physics and the forces.
Just note that you are Rhinolining a medium that is flexible. Rhino will be flexible also to a point. That point may be the same, lesser or more than the medium. And it'll be dependant on the thickness of course.
If you do go that route with Rhino, can Rhino be applied smooth? A rough finish wouldn't it be difficult to clean?

I'm still currently a wheeler with a Bronco in the garage for 2 yrs now getting a drivetrain swap and TJ (tired old 4cyl/auto) on 34's. My Scamp at 1800#s is a little heavy for the TJ.
__________________
Mike jagular is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2006, 09:35 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
Coach George Jessup's Avatar
 
Trailer: Scamp
Posts: 358
Send a message via MSN to Coach George Jessup
Quote:
....Just note that you are Rhinolining ....
Understand your points. Also for the record I realy prefer Durabak over Rhino ( http://www.nonslipcoating.com/ )
__________________
Coach George Jessup is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2006, 11:19 AM   #22
Moderator
 
Gina D.'s Avatar
 
Name: Gina D.
Trailer: '77 Leocraft 17 & Former Burro owner and fan!
West Coast USA
Posts: 9,016
Registry
Here is a fine example of what can happen from tree branch damage.

Roys new project Boler

This was PASSIVE damage.. the branch fell, it was not rammed into.
__________________
Gina D. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2006, 02:52 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
Brian B-P's Avatar
 
Name: Brian
Trailer: Boler (B1700RGH) 1979
Alberta
Posts: 5,000
Quote:
Here is a fine example of what can happen from tree branch damage.

Roys new project Boler

This was PASSIVE damage.. the branch fell, it was not rammed into.
Thanks for the eBay link, Gina. In addition to the fiberglass damage (the reason for the link) the information added later by the seller is fascinating. They got a lot of questions (about the usual weight and frame issues, etc.), did some web research for answers, and made the following observation:
Quote:
It seems that there are a lot of friendly and helpful folks who own Bolers!


The other stuff in the posting is worth reading, too. Too bad it will disappear from eBay eventually.
__________________

__________________
1979 Boler B1700RGH, pulled by 2004 Toyota Sienna LE 2WD
Information is good. Lack of information is not so good, but misinformation is much worse. Check facts, and apply common sense liberally.
STATUS: No longer active in forum.
Brian B-P is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
scamp


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
SCAMP lightweight trailer Kevin K Referrals: Molded Fiberglass Trailers 1 05-18-2010 06:22 AM
2007 13' scamp trailer Kevin K Classified Archives 2 08-30-2009 01:00 PM
Rigid Spare Tire Cover Supplier? js73751 Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 7 05-25-2009 08:44 AM
A question about a NEW Scamp Trailer mcnick Care and Feeding of Molded Fiberglass Trailers 11 02-12-2009 08:27 AM
13" Scamp Trailer Kevin K Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 7 11-10-2007 11:44 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.