Fridge options - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 08-15-2009, 10:05 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Trailer: Burro
Posts: 9
I'm new here,
I recently purchased a Burro 13 (Our first camper)) which has had the original Dometic replaced with an AC only "dorm room" type fridge. I'm considering my options between Ice Box, new propane/120ac fridge, or just better securing and trimming out around the existing unit. I believe that I will spend enough time in areas where AC power is not available to make the propane fridge seem like the better option (but costly) although an ice box poses the issue of where to optain block ice when on the road. I've considered the idea of just using coolers in the tow vehicle and converting the fridge area to storage shelves..then again when power is available the existing unit works quite nicely. I've read the Dometic installation instructions which indicate the need to seal off the rear of the fridge from the rest of the camper interior and currently that area is not exactly a sealed compartment. So...any advice from the experienced? Thank you.
__________________

__________________
Wade W. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2009, 01:17 PM   #2
Moderator
 
Frederick L. Simson's Avatar
 
Name: Frederick
Trailer: Fiber Stream
California
Posts: 8,151
Registry
Send a message via AIM to Frederick L. Simson
Talking

Quote:
I recently purchased a Burro 13 (Our first camper)) which has had the original Dometic replaced with an AC only "dorm room" type fridge. I'm considering my options...
This is a very common "Fix" when people are confronted with the sticker shock of gas/electric absorption units. Are the vents to the outside still in place within the refridgerator space of the kitchen cabinet? Since the Burro kitchen unit is a molded-in part of the interior, I would think that sealing the fridge from the interior would be less of a hassle than in other trailers...

If you use "Blue Ice" packs, your Dorm Fridge might be used as a "Hybrid" Ice Box. Just one alternative.

In my case, when my 31 year old absorption refridgerator fails, I'm going to pay the price to have it replaced with a new 3-way unit.
__________________

__________________
Frederick - The Scaleman
1978 Fiber Stream 16 named "Eggstasy" & 1971 Compact Jr. named "Boomerang"
Frederick L. Simson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2009, 03:13 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
peterh's Avatar
 
Name: Peter
Trailer: 2005 19 ft Scamp 19 ft 5th Wheel
Oregon
Posts: 1,519
Registry
We have no real use for 12v cooling in our fridge. We've found that plugging in the night before to get everything nice and cold, then packing our cold storage stuff inside with plastic bins of ice keeps our fridge nice and cold until we're at our destination. When we set-up we plug in or switch the propane on, and we're happy campers.
__________________
peterh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2009, 03:15 PM   #4
Member
 
Roy Massen's Avatar
 
Trailer: Boler 1975 13 ft
Posts: 57
I wanted to go electric / solar and not have a propane fridge. So purchased one of the small low energy use Tundra 12 volt refrigerators (uses about 4.5 amps when it runs which I figure comes to about 50 amps hrs a day. Had to cut the opening a little taller but if fit where the old one was. I had enough room to keep the drawer above it. Started with a 75 watt solar panel but found it didn't keep things going more that a couple of days without drawing the batteries down. I added a 120 watt panel to my system and with the total of 195 watts of solar panels I have enough power to run the fridge, lights and computer without running down the batteries.

I have a small microwave that runs off of 120 volts and an inverter but so far have only used it when on shore power.



Name:   kitchen3.jpg
Views: 114
Size:  15.8 KB
__________________
Roy Massen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2009, 03:38 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
pjanits's Avatar
 
Name: Pete
Trailer: 17 ft 1986 Burro
Tennessee
Posts: 881
I replaced the fridge in our 13' Burro with an air conditioner and additional pan storage above it, We picked up a Coleman 12v cooler in 2004 , and are still using it, and I figure with the 17 Burro we now have I will transport stuff in the cooler and transfer over to the built in fridge. Minor adjustments along the way but all bases should be covered. Of course we will run the fridge on A/c before traveling to get it cold, but the 12 vdc part uses 8 amps and the cooler we have doesn't even come close to that. I'm not sure I want to run on propane while traveling but may give it a shot to see how works.
__________________
pjanits is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2009, 04:04 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Joe Z's Avatar
 
Trailer: Casita
New River AZ
Posts: 1,043
Like PeterH posted above I never once used the DC Part of the fridge...... cool it off on ac current the night before then switch over to gas for a very economical fridge...even while traveling.... wonder if the ac/propane only fridge is much cheaper than the three way?
__________________
Joe and Linda
2013 Casita SD
Dodge Ram 4x4
Joe Z is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2009, 08:26 AM   #7
Junior Member
 
Trailer: Burro
Posts: 9
[quote]I wanted to go electric / solar and not have a propane fridge. So purchased one of the small low energy use Tundra 12 volt refrigerators (uses about 4.5 amps when it runs which I figure comes to about 50 amps hrs a day. Had to cut the opening a little taller but if fit where the old one was. I had enough room to keep the drawer above it. Started with a 75 watt solar panel but found it didn't keep things going more that a couple of days without drawing the batteries down. I added a 120 watt panel to my system and with the total of 195 watts of solar panels I have enough power to run the fridge, lights and computer without running down the batteries.

I have a small microwave that runs off of 120 volts and an inverter but so far have only used it when on shore power.


Attachment 22710


Thanks for the info and link...that's an option that I had not thought about but will consider as I look into solar and my required load.
__________________
Wade W. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2009, 08:30 AM   #8
Junior Member
 
Trailer: Burro
Posts: 9
Quote:
We have no real use for 12v cooling in our fridge. We've found that plugging in the night before to get everything nice and cold, then packing our cold storage stuff inside with plastic bins of ice keeps our fridge nice and cold until we're at our destination. When we set-up we plug in or switch the propane on, and we're happy campers.
Nice work on your modifications...thanks for posting the link Peter
__________________
Wade W. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2009, 08:43 AM   #9
Junior Member
 
Trailer: Burro
Posts: 9
Quote:
This is a very common "Fix" when people are confronted with the sticker shock of gas/electric absorption units. Are the vents to the outside still in place within the refridgerator space of the kitchen cabinet? Since the Burro kitchen unit is a molded-in part of the interior, I would think that sealing the fridge from the interior would be less of a hassle than in other trailers...

If you use "Blue Ice" packs, your Dorm Fridge might be used as a "Hybrid" Ice Box. Just one alternative.

In my case, when my 31 year old absorption refridgerator fails, I'm going to pay the price to have it replaced with a new 3-way unit.
Yes both the exterior upper and lower vents are still in place for proper air flow...the interior of the dorm fridge is so small that it would be unusable if blue ice packs were used. Two soda cans and a pack of bacon and you're done. You are correct about the compartment sealing issue being easier than other models but it still requires some type of box insert. Since the outside vents are still in place that makes it less work though.
__________________
Wade W. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2009, 08:48 AM   #10
Junior Member
 
Trailer: Burro
Posts: 9
Quote:
I replaced the fridge in our 13' Burro with an air conditioner and additional pan storage above it, We picked up a Coleman 12v cooler in 2004 , and are still using it, and I figure with the 17 Burro we now have I will transport stuff in the cooler and transfer over to the built in fridge. Minor adjustments along the way but all bases should be covered. Of course we will run the fridge on A/c before traveling to get it cold, but the 12 vdc part uses 8 amps and the cooler we have doesn't even come close to that. I'm not sure I want to run on propane while traveling but may give it a shot to see how works.
Running on propane while traveling opens up issues for gas stops and tunnels, you definitely don't want an open flame pilot anywhere near a gas pump
Cabela's has a great sale on Extreme coolers this week so I will definitely add that to the tow vehicle.
__________________
Wade W. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2009, 02:40 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Raya's Avatar
 
Name: Rachel
Trailer: 1974 Boler 13 ft (Neonex/Winnipeg)
Posts: 3,014
Actually, having seen the kitchen cabinet on a U-haul (which I think is the same as a Burro), I don't think there would be much difference in sealing off the fridge on that than on a Boler/clone that is not "double hulled." That's because the kitchen unit on the U-haul/Burro is still "open" in that it is open to the rest of the kitchen unit (and, in fact, probably even more open to the rest of the camper behind the rest of the "double hull." The lower kitchen unit on my Boler is essentially sealed to the outside walls all around itself, but I could still easily get combustion byproducts into the camper through the stove openings, the lower cupboard doors, the drawer, etc.

On my boler there is an aluminum (or maybe it's galvanized metal - in any case it's like HVAC ductwork metal) enclosure that runs around the sides of the fridge and seals it off from the rest of the kitchen cabinet. I don't think it's hermetically sealed, but it is probably more than adequate. You could probably accomplish the same thing with plywood and duct tape, although it wouldn't be elegant. You could use metal ductwork like in the Boler, or fiberglass tabbed to the hull, or etc.

A cooler is darned simple though, if you have access to ice blocks, or can make them. And you can move it outside if you cook out there, and take it back into your house to load up, empty, or clean; so they do have advantages.

Raya
__________________

__________________
Raya is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
fridge


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
76 scamp rim options jimtesla General Chat 2 08-28-2009 09:34 PM
Cushion options? Stacy Crotser Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 8 02-09-2009 09:14 PM
Curtain Options Graeme Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 8 07-13-2008 08:42 AM
hot water: options ?? Legacy Posts General Chat 5 07-20-2003 09:55 AM
Experimenting with LED options peterh Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 0 12-31-1969 07:00 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:01 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.