How heavy IS a trillium 4500?? - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 06-08-2003, 02:32 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
Trailer: No Trailer Yet
Posts: 18,870
Drinking and cooking no. But how about for cleaning counter tops or washing dishes or ... I don't know... that cute little sink and water tank have got to be good for something.
__________________

__________________
Legacy Posts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2003, 03:32 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
Trailer: No Trailer Yet
Posts: 18,870
Hi Maggie
We use the campground water for everything but drinking and cooking. Unless it's posted as not safe.

We got rid of our water tank shortly after we got the trailer. We added an extra long piece of the clear hose onto the pump (at the sink). We stick the hose out the water tanks fill up and and into a portable water container that sits by the trailer. This way we don't have a water tank that we won't use taking up storage space. Also the portable container gets rinsed out and air dried when we get home. Its also easier to refill at the campsite.
Nancy
__________________

__________________
Legacy Posts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2003, 05:37 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Trailer: No Trailer Yet
Posts: 18,870
Wow, they are heavier than I thought!

Well, so much for buying a new Vibe- They are only able to Tow 1500lbs..
:cry

Todd
__________________
Legacy Posts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2003, 12:37 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
Trailer: No Trailer Yet
Posts: 18,870
Trillium 4500 weight

I weighted my new to me Trillium 4500 at a BC government weight scale. The reading was 800 kgs (1760 lbs.), this was a pretty much empty trailer, and I had my truck connected.

The rating for the axle is 2,000 lbs, so it may not be hard to exceed. Mine has a 2 way Dometic fridge, a 3 burner stove, Duo-Therm furnace, and a single propane tank and single battery.

Hope this helps.

PS my Nissan Pathfinder has a 5000 lb tow rating, and mountain passes are handled with ease. It appears that my fuel economy is about the same as with the Boler 1300.

Rick B
__________________
Legacy Posts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2003, 09:21 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
Trailer: No Trailer Yet
Posts: 18,870
icky water!

Oh, I wouldn't be caught drinking out fo the water tank, that is fer sure. I don't even drink tap water at home (bleck!). But I haven't seen my water system yet, so I don't know how or if I'll use it. But, if I decide to boondock anywhere, I will need washing water. I will need drinking water jugs no matter where I go. Either way, several gallons of water, some food, clothes and bedding (my obligatory boxes of books) and I'm over my limit.

I think I'm gonna have to use some of the creative ideas I have seen here for lowering the weight. Let's see, if I get rid of the particle wood doors, and I remove the top bunk (using cushions for the back of the couch), eat only puffed rice, and I store the water in the tow vehicle.....
__________________
Legacy Posts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2003, 01:03 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Trailer: No Trailer Yet
Posts: 18,870
JR -- Some things I've done to conserve weight -- Since we don't drink water out of the tank, we don't travel with water in the tank. I fill the tank when I arrive and empty it when I leave. We use it only for washing. This works just fine unless we are so boondocked that there is no water available near the campsite.

We bring a limited amount of bottled water to drink and cook with (with which to cook?...)(with is not a word to end a phrase with...), and we carry it in the tow vehicle. We used to bring 10 gallons or more with us, but one day made the brilliant discovery that even in other places, they sell the stuff in stores! So, we carry about a 2 day supply, unless we will be away from any stores for longer.

By cleaning up after each meal, we need to carry fewer cups, plates, silverware, and cookware. Keeps the camper more pleasant, too.

We've discovered that a 20 lb propane tank holds several years worth of propane. If you don't run a furnace, you can cook and run a fridge for several days on one or two little 1 lb bottles. Run on electric when it's available.

As much as I love cast iron cookware, porcelain coated steel is much lighter (aluminum can be very light, too, but food sticks and burns, and there are the health questions).

Frequently survey the cabinets for things you aren't using. Leave 'em behind. Don't carry more extension cords than you need.

Also, if you tend to camp at places with electricity, and can either run the fridge on propane or leave it off while on the road, you can forego having a battery. This will save 50 lbs or so. You can occasionally run lights off the car battery if you are careful, in case you get stuck every now and then without shore power.
__________________
Legacy Posts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2003, 01:54 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
Trailer: No Trailer Yet
Posts: 18,870
Other ideas...

All good ideas, Paul, thanks.

I am also considering jettisoning the furnace. Seems like it will be heavier than the little Black Cat I have. Can't imagine needing much more heat than that in this little thing. A second Cat would still be light weight and allow for more heat if I decided I was freezing in there. Already have a small electric cube heater. That would also open up some storage space. I don't need to carry both during the hottest months.

Hot water heater seems like a heavy luxury as well. If I rip out the water sytem, there will be no point in having a hot water heater. I'm pretty adept at the stove-top hot water heating anyway. No water system would mean easier winterizing. I'm looking at a lot of time in the Rockies and into Alaska. Hmm... :conf

Just paid a fair amount of money for a loaded trailer in good condition, now I'm gonna be strippin'er down. Ah well, the point is to have as much freedom as possible, right?

Anyone gonna want some Trillium parts?:lol
__________________
Legacy Posts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2003, 02:02 PM   #22
Senior Member
 
Trailer: No Trailer Yet
Posts: 18,870
Hi JR
Seriously think before getting rid of that furnace. If it is the kind that doesn't require the fan they are wonderful for boondocking. We took ours out thinking we'ed never use it and have regretted that decision ever since.

These trailers have alot more storage than one would first think. There are 4 of use and we often have half empty bins.
Nancy
__________________
Legacy Posts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2003, 02:14 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
Trailer: No Trailer Yet
Posts: 18,870
Clearly you have never camped with me...

I tend to be an overpacker. Oh sure, I may only have two pairs of pants and three pairs of socks for a week (I'd rather wash stuff out than carry suitcases jammed full) but I tend to have tons of "must-haves." For the westward trip I am bringing:

*4 birds, plus cages and food
*dog, plus food, her bed (spoiled? nah!) and accessories
*fully stocked kitchen (leaving the pasta maker at home!)
*two boxes of books
*laptop, inkjet, cell phone and related "office" paraphenalia
*craft/art supplies (beading, cross stitch, crochet, watercolors and easel)
*clothes
*toiletries
*two camp chairs
*camping stuff like axe, tools, etc.
*tiny washer and clothes rack dryer

And various other stuff no thinking person would take camping...

Doesn't help that on this portion of the trip I am moving at the same time I am camping. I'll lighten the load some by shipping stuff to Utah and then lighten more once I get there by leaving the birds with my mom for a while.

I do plan some shake out trips before I leave for good. That will give me a chance to lighten the load a bit.

I will rethink that furnace though. Better to wait and see if I use it first.
__________________
Legacy Posts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2003, 02:26 PM   #24
Senior Member
 
Trailer: No Trailer Yet
Posts: 18,870
Years ago with the old Starcraft pop up, we took so much stuff I don't know how the poor van ever managed to drag it down the road. We even took our own firewood. We had something for every remote possibility and clothes enough that we wouldn't have to wash clothes for a month. All this for a weekend trip.

Over the years we have gotten rid of things that never got used. Now we don't even take anything electrical unless we know we have an electrical site. All the electrical stuff is in a bin to throw in when needed.

Yup, we were going to take that top bunk off too but last year changed things. Our bunny in his cage spent his time up there. Makes a great storage shelf also.
Nancy
__________________

__________________
Legacy Posts is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
trillium


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
OH | 1981 Trillium 1300 Trade for a Trillium 4500 Gene Griffin Classified Archives 13 03-06-2011 08:27 AM
1979 Trillium 4500 for sale -- C$5200 or US$4500 - SOLD jenniferm Classified Archives 8 07-14-2009 02:38 PM
Trillium 4500 nick c Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 13 12-13-2007 06:40 PM
My new-to-me 78 Trillium 4500 Mark Woytovich Care and Feeding of Molded Fiberglass Trailers 5 08-14-2007 08:28 PM
Our New Trillium 4500 CDeLaCruz Modifications, Alterations and Updates 4 05-17-2007 10:25 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:19 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.