How often to get wheel bearings packed? - Page 3 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 09-26-2015, 08:18 PM   #29
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If your Hunter has an orig. drop axle I would pack them once a year. The axles on these trailers don't have tight rubber seals. They use a mechanical metal seal and dust and water can eaisly get to the bearings. They can be retrofit to use a rubber seal but you will need to pull the hub to check it out.
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Old 09-26-2015, 08:24 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by Carol H View Post
The reason for that is car wheel bearings are a very different animal than trailer wheel bearings. Which you will be sure to discover should you decide to continue to maintain them as you do your cars wheel bearings
My teardrop trailer actually uses the same bearing as the inner wheel bearing as my truck. So how are they different? My truck weighs much more than my trailer and the front wheels on the truck take way more abuse than a trailer.

I have over 20000 miles on my trailer and 150000 miles on my truck. I have never had a failure on either one.

I am not try to start a fight but I think it is absurd that a trailer bearing would need to be serviced more often then a car if they are properly lubed and installed.

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Old 09-26-2015, 08:31 PM   #31
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I did the bearings on my tent trailer once. Wasn't that difficult, but so much easier for a shop with a solvent wash tank and lots of shop rags.
What do you do with the solvent?
I used to give it to my half brother to make mixed drinks with, but he's dead now.
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Old 09-26-2015, 08:48 PM   #32
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Wow.. .good find there Jeremy. Especially enjoyed the first paragraph. Liked the statistics in the second and agree 100% with the last one.

VERY interesting that the teardrop bearing is the same as your truck: "Different animals" eh??

Quote:
Originally Posted by rainjer View Post
My teardrop trailer actually uses the same bearing as the inner wheel bearing as my truck. So how are they different? My truck weighs much more than my trailer and the front wheels on the truck take way more abuse than a trailer.

I have over 20000 miles on my trailer and 150000 miles on my truck. I have never had a failure on either one.

I am not try to start a fight but I think it is absurd that a trailer bearing would need to be serviced more often then a car if they are properly lubed and installed.

Jeremy
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Old 09-26-2015, 11:49 PM   #33
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Some musings related to the subject of wheel bearings...

I see many of you bring bicycles along with your travels...

How many of you know that the average multispeed bicycle has nine bearing sets which must be serviced and repacked and 114 pins on the average chain, each of which has a wheel which must be cleaned and lubricated, plus deraileurs and cables, shifters and levers and brakes.
And of course tires which must be checked for pressure and condition at least every three or four days, not to mention two more bearings on each pedal.
Most people ignore their bikes until something quits working...
I spend about half of my shop time every year repairing and servicing bicycles, most of which have been abandoned to charity and require a lot of work just to be rideable.

I won't even begin to estimate the average number of serviceable or wear parts found in the average (Tow) vehicle.
Broken or badly worn and neglected motor vehicles constitute the majority of the rest of my shop time along with everything from lawnmowers to trailers, even snowblowers.
I truly love to help and I am not claiming to be overworked.

My eight bikes average 23 years of age and the average age of my three daily driven vehicles is 15 years. They are all ready to go at a moment's notice, but true trust belongs only to God.
Everything else must be verified or expected to fail.

I just wanted to point out that the next time you are preparing to leave the driveway on a trip, think about the wheel bearings on your trailer...
then step back , take a deep breath an give a moment of thought about how many other moving parts you are taking with you. Then at least check the fluids and pressures in your tow vehicle, Please.

Then if you still feel undaunted, have a nice trip!
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Old 09-27-2015, 12:40 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by Darral T. View Post

VERY interesting that the teardrop bearing is the same as your truck: "Different animals" eh??
LOL the bearing may be the same but the simulates end there. Car wheel bearings due to a few major differences as to how they are installed are far more protected from moisture contamination etc.

As with all things we all get to decide what to worry about and not worry about and 9 times out of 10 those that worry about something have had a real life experience or two that the party that doesn't worry about it has yet to have
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Old 09-27-2015, 05:52 AM   #35
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I assume the engineers at Dexter determined that 12k miles or yearly was a good service interval for the product they designed. I'm not going to second guess them. It costs less than $15 for two seals, 2 cotter pins, and 2 palms full of grease to do the job and takes me about an hour. In that time I also check the brakes, check the condition of the spindle, check the wear and condition of the tires, replace the cotter pin that holds the wheel on and torque the lug nuts. Fifteen bucks and 1 hour = peace of mind. What others do is their business. Raz
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Old 09-27-2015, 08:57 PM   #36
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LOL the bearing may be the same but the simulates end there. Car wheel bearings due to a few major differences as to how they are installed are far more protected from moisture contamination etc.
HUH??? Help me out here, please explain
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Old 09-27-2015, 11:03 PM   #37
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We're waiting Carol...

"Few major differences" of how they're installed????

"Far more protected"??? When they're both running behind seals????
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Old 09-28-2015, 05:00 PM   #38
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The origin of this whole controversy may well rest in this observation...
When I worked fleet we had a set of four Coke Haul trucks with two trailers and a pup each. When they were run daily they performed well between scheduled maintenance.
The job was replaced by a huge conveyor.
The trucks would then be serviced and parked... for months and months between being pressed into emergency service. If they were parked for more than six months they would NOT be in a useful condition and would require extensive service to get them going. Tires , brakes airlines pivot points etc would seize up or lose lubrication.
This is true of trailers which sit in the yard most of the year, everything deteriorates sitting. Wiring, bearings, brakes, tires etc.
Your trailer may well need attention after a couple of months sitting outside in bad weather, or it may be fine for years if towed regularly and stored out of the weather.
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Old 09-28-2015, 05:31 PM   #39
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Take your cars wheel bearing and put it on the table. Take the cars tire and put it on the table. Now take your trailers bearing and put it on the table with your trailers tire. All of us small tire and small bearing trailers go the same distance as the car when towed but the trailer tire is turning more as is the the bearing. There isn't as much a margin of error. Most people loading a trailer are loading it close to trailer & axle specs. there isn't much excess capacity built in. Trailers are at a big disadvantage especially when your down to the smaller bearing and axle sizes. Now slam those tires and bearings into a pothole. those bearings are going to take a beating.

I don't tow much and the trailer sits most of its life. Its not being used regularly so the moisture builds up in the grease and doesn't get cooked off like regular use would do so my system runs the risk of premature failure. Under these conditions I clean and repack every 2 years or 3 at most. If I have long trips planned I clean and regrease before the first trip of the season even if I greased them last year. I know at least I am starting off on a good foot. I don't want to waste my limited vacation time having to deal with a stupid bearing failure ruining whats supposed to be a fun trip. Destroying a welded on axle in the middle of nowhere just isn't worth it to me when it can be easily prevented.
This lets me sleep better.
You got big bearings and large tires you can forgo to to much longer maintenance schedules. To each his own, what ever lets you sleep at night.
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Old 09-28-2015, 05:32 PM   #40
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I do mine once a year and keep a close eye on hub temps when traveling. I also carry a small grease gun and give the hubs a shot of grease if I think the They are getting a bit on the warm side. I use a laser themometer from Harbor Frieght that although may not be very good I have found to be a good indicator of the running temps.
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Old 09-28-2015, 07:06 PM   #41
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While I do believe that stuff needs lubrication, sometimes we can do more harm than good. The only bearing/hub failure I have personally had in 40+ years of driving/towing was my own fault. I was young and did not really know what I was doing and tightened the nut too tight and destroyed a bearing. I learned a valuable lesson that day.


To answer the original question, I look at the hubs on my utility trailers and if I have no reason to suspect anything is amiss I leave them alone. I have only had my Scamp a year and half and put a new axle under it when I got it. I checked the axle for grease when I got it and have maybe put 5000 miles on it since. I may check it next summer before we leave on a long trip but this Fall, Winter, and Spring will just be short, semi-local camping trips and I am not worried.
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Old 09-28-2015, 10:33 PM   #42
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Take your cars wheel bearing...
...This lets me sleep better.
To each his own, what ever lets you sleep at night.
Commendable,uh, attitude,
Sleep well,
After all ... You're only supposed to sleep with the trailer parked...

Rip Van Winkle would wake up to bad tires, bearings, and fungus all over his trailer. The moral is of course about the same.
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