I Wish I'd Known on My First Trip - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 05-16-2014, 03:49 PM   #15
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Name: Dave W
Trailer: Trillium 4500 - 1977, 1978 (2), 1300 - 1977, 1973, and a 1972
Alberta
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Third on checking the torque on the lug nuts:
Almost lost a wheel
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Old 05-16-2014, 04:15 PM   #16
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As many have said, check your bearing/hubs for heat factor. As they also mentioned they can be hot, real hot if there is an issue. One thing I learned after I was in charge of checking my own, was to carry a canvas (sorry don't know what other to call it, other than canvas) Gloves. You can check your temps without grabbing a hot one! Let's just say, I learned the hard way......

The canvas glove protects your hand but allows you to know if it's hot or not. I just carry mine in the door compartment of my truck, grab them slip them on, feel the hubs!


Grabbing an overheated hub is like smacking your head getting out of the Casita. You only do it once to learn a valuable lesson!
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Old 05-16-2014, 04:38 PM   #17
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Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact II
California
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Every time you stop for gas and anytime you leave your rig unattended, check the hitch and the drawbar pin & lock.

Always carry a small set of tools and a voltmeter. You may not be able to fix things, but the person that stops to help may be able to with the right tools. I know about a $500+ towing bill that could have been avoided with a 10mm wrench.
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Old 05-16-2014, 05:55 PM   #18
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Name: Leslie
Trailer: Alto R1723
North Carolina
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Thanks for all the great suggestions! I look forward to reading any more that you'd like to share.

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Old 05-16-2014, 06:07 PM   #19
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Trailer: Escape 5.0 TA
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Always do a walk around when you are ready to leave home or a camp site.
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Old 05-16-2014, 08:21 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stevebaz View Post
torque the lugnuts before you leave then 10 miles down the road then again in about 50 miles. do this until you dont have to retorque them the second time. Sometimes new lug nuts and wheels take a little bit before they properly seat together. I recheck my lugnut torque just before every trip.

I used to over tighten my lug nuts. Now I put them on snug and grease the threads for easier removal like the racers do. Never had one loosen up yet.
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Old 05-16-2014, 08:52 PM   #21
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Trailer: Escape 21 - Felicity
Oregon
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Originally Posted by padlin00 View Post
Always do a walk around when you are ready to leave home or a camp site.
And be sure to peek underneath the trailer to find out what the kids left under there or what blew in with the wind. I leave the handle I use on the jacks UNDER the trailer when I arrive so I have to look under the trailer in order to leave.

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Old 05-16-2014, 11:07 PM   #22
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Name: Francesca Knowles
Trailer: '78 Trillium 4500
Jefferson County, Washington State, U.S.A.
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Maiden voyage should be mostly devoted to learning to handle towing the trailer. Pay close attention to tongue weight proportions, get your hitch set up properly, read/understand all trailer brake instructions, and listen to the combination when you're going down the road. Don't attempt speeds higher than 50 until you're comfortable with reacting/responding to the cues the trailer gives you to varying circumstances on the road.
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Old 05-17-2014, 02:36 PM   #23
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Trailer: Li'l Hauley
Oklahoma
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I made a check list of things to do before breaking camp, and for the first year or two I made sure I checked everything on the list before pulling out. It takes a while to form correct habits. Example of things for your list:
Unhook water hose
Unhook power cord
Stow wheel chocks
Lower antenna
Raise stabilizer jacks
Make sure all windows are closed... etc.

You should buy 2 white fresh water hoses. 1 is occasionally not long enough. You need a water pressure regulator on the end of the hose before it goes into your trailer. If the power plug is a 30 amp, you need to buy a 30A to 20A adapter (not every place has a 30A receptacle). Carry 2 extension cords, just in case (same as water).
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Old 05-17-2014, 05:58 PM   #24
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Name: Dave
Trailer: Trillium
Newfoundland & Labrador
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Wheel bearing temps.

If you have to use your hand to check [almost any heat source] use the back of your fingers. This way if there is enough heat to cause a physical reaction your fingers will naturally curl inwards toward your palm and away from the heat source when you jerk your hand away. Think about it.
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Old 05-17-2014, 06:13 PM   #25
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Trailer: Trillium
Newfoundland & Labrador
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Check list

Make a pre-departure check list and use it until it becomes habit.
Lights [all functions] (I check mine at every stop too)
Ball and hitch
Locks and safety pins
Chains
Propane off
Hatches secured
Etc.
And, after you pull away, stop, get out and go back to the site and check the area where your rig was sitting.
Good luck with the new rig.... Scouter Dave
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Old 05-17-2014, 06:53 PM   #26
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Name: Alan
Trailer: 1977 Scamp 13'
Minnesota
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I set the cruise control on 55, stayed in the slow lane and put 70's funk on Pandora and we had a great time.

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Old 05-17-2014, 08:12 PM   #27
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Trailer: '04 Scamp 19D, Tacoma 4.0L 4door, SB
ex VT, now CO
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Here is my checklist. Some of it will be simplified eventually, but when I was starting last year with *no* experience, I decided to be anal about it. Some of it was updated after driving on a few really rough roads - like the straps to keep the fridge and oven closed.

Scamp hitching checklist:
1. Raise rear stabilizer jacks.
2. Hitch - lower tailgate to intermediate angle using the special hook.
3. Align white line and back straight in, raise tailgate and check ball alignment.
4. Lower onto ball, secure latch with padlock.
5. Safety chains, crosswise.
6. Stash the crank.
7. Connect vehicle power (7-pin round).
8. Raise front jacks, pull pins, raise lower part, re-insert and secure pins.
9. Shut off gas on both cylinders.
10. Check all lights.
11. Check tire pressure and wear, spare pressure.
12. Disconnect all outside connections and secure.
13. Close and latch windows, vents, close bathroom door. Secure drawers.
14. Take down the table.
15. Put fridge in travel mode (turn OFF) and secure stuff inside. Secure fridge door with strap.
16. Secure oven door with strap, set range wire rack on floor.
17. Turn faucets and appliances off, including water pump.
18. Put stuff inside into crates on the floor. Do not cover power converter.
19. Secure screen door, lock the door, tie the string and retract the step.
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Old 05-17-2014, 08:29 PM   #28
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Name: Leslie
Trailer: Alto R1723
North Carolina
Posts: 91
These are great everyone! Thank you! My list of things to bring/remember is getting longer.

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