Leaving a propane radiant heater on all night - Page 3 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 11-09-2008, 09:37 AM   #29
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Catalytic gas and electric heaters are safe to use inside, but ventilation and a Carbon Monoxide detector are always a good idea. For air circulation a small, 12 volt DC fan should do the trick well enough.
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Old 11-09-2008, 12:45 PM   #30
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I have no Carbon Monoxide or Propane gas detectors in my little Burro. I do have a smoke detector I will be installing. Can anyone recomend some brands/models and a place to purchase. I bet you can....
I have my old catalitic heater up and working.
Thanks
Dave
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Old 11-09-2008, 01:40 PM   #31
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Dave, I don't think that you will need a carbon detector, presumming that your little burro won't be hooked up to natural gas. But a LP propane detector is a must in my book. I have seen them at wallie world as well as camping world. I just googled Rv LP propane detector and several models came up. Here's a link for one at camping world as an example. Robin


http://www.campingworld.com/shopping/item/...ane-alarm/21239
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Old 11-09-2008, 08:26 PM   #32
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A C/O detector is a good thing to have and has nothing to do with Nat. Gas. It detects CO which is a colorless, ordorless gas. Which is a by product of combustion/flame etc. no matter the source of fuel which could be LP , Nat Gas etc.
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Old 12-02-2008, 07:41 PM   #33
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Hi there,


WE use our blankets and sleeping bags too, but we need heat. When the temps are in the high 20's for a few days we disconnect from water supply, but we still have water in our tank and we still use the sink and toilet. We use a small 12 volt or battery powered fan to push the air back under the bed/storage area. Usually we are not boondocking and we use a small electric ceramic furnace. However, we plan on boondocking and so this thread is very informative. We are looking at some non/low electric alternative heater. Thanks for all the info


Melanie and Joseph

Fulltime July 2005 - September 2006
And now since May 2008
Campground hosts at Sesquicentennial State Park, SC til January.
Staying at River Bottom Campground Swansea, SC for the winter while teaching for 6 months in Lexinton




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Old 12-03-2008, 09:30 AM   #34
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We travel mostly in winter. Living in Washington state and having family members in Missouri and California, we make that circuit, usually around Thanksgiving time or Christmas/New Year time. Then, being retired we take several weeks along the Gulf Coast, then west to California and finally back home. So you get the picture -- we prepare for both cold and warm weather.

We take warm weather sleeping bags and cold weather bags. When in cold weather, we are "on the road", so when we make the bed into a dinette in the morning, I take the cold weather bags to the tow vehicle and lay them out loose. This allows them to dry out and air out as we travel.

In the evening before retiring, we heat some water and use it for hot-water bottles. This especially helps with the initial cold shock of getting into a cold sleeping bag.

Also before retiring in the evening, I stage the kettle filled with enough water for morning coffee on a burner, along with the match box, coffee cone with fresh filter paper and coffee tin. Then, in the morning, I can pop out of bed, light the stove burner under the kettle, light a small Coleman portable catalytic heater in the bathroom and pop back into my sleeping bag in about a minute. When the kettle starts to boil, the trailer is toasty warm for getting up and going.

Even during the warmer parts of our trips, we do it the same way, even to bringing the sleeping bags to the tow vehicle. One reason for this is the open sleeping bags hide our stuff that may be "eye candy" for someone of questionable honesty.

I could also mention my propane fireplace, but that isn't something that most on this forum would have much interest in.

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Old 12-03-2008, 11:51 AM   #35
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Quote:
...

I could also mention my propane fireplace, but that isn't something that most on this forum would have much interest in.
Assuming your not talking about a fireplace in your egg.... I would still be intrested as I am looking for ideas for heating the cabin I live in.

Your welcome to PM me on the subject.
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Old 12-03-2008, 12:09 PM   #36
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I'd like to hear about the fireplace, if you don't mind telling about it here.

Raya
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Old 02-16-2009, 04:31 PM   #37
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Mechanical things can go wrong, break down not function properly. I would use (YES) mechanical detectors and maybe a back up. Use heaters only while awake and check the CO meter every .15 min. Obvious that the vents should be properly open. I use a propane flame heater and it heats the 6x10 in 15 min and shut it off b4 bed.
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Old 02-16-2009, 07:25 PM   #38
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I'd like to hear about the fireplace, if you don't mind telling about it here.

Raya
Sorry for the delay, but we left on our winter sojourn to warmer climes and recently returned.

The fireplace is made by Dickenson in B.C. Canada. I bought mine from Fisheries Supply in Seattle, WA. It was on the pricey side, but well worth it in my opinion for ambiance it gives with its yellow colored flames reflected in dancing patterns on the ceiling of the Scamp at night.
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Old 02-21-2009, 06:21 PM   #39
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I use the Coleman Black Cat heater in my 13' with no problems. I used to be a big fan of the Atwood/Suburban built-in heaters, but just don't see the need for all that jazz anymore. They're heavy, mechanically complicated (comapred to a catalytic), and take up valuable room which could otherwise be used for storage when you're not using it - which is most of the time.

I have camped in temps down into the teens and it stays quite toasty, but I make sure to crack all the windows and the roof vent about 1-2". Don't worry, all your heat isn't going to go out the windows. It will stay pretty warm. Make sure you have extra batteries and bottles, as you'll get about 6 hours out of a full propane bottle. If your D batteries (powering the fan) die, your heater becomes pretty much worthless. It's pretty amazing how much air that little fan can move.

I store the heater under the dinette seat in the cold months. In the summer it just goes away in the garage and I don't need to worry about it. As far as bedding is concerned, I keep the heater on the front bench seat when it is on, on top of a 12x12" piece of plywood so it can't rock or tip. If I'm camping with my dog, I keep it on top of the stove so she can't knock it over accidentally. All in all it's very safe.
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Old 03-12-2009, 10:42 AM   #40
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Angelo F said:
I keep the heater on the front bench seat when it is on, on top of a 12x12" piece of plywood so it can't rock or tip. If I'm camping with my dog, I keep it on top of the stove so she can't knock it over accidentally.
Stability was a concern for us also, so we mounted our catalytic on the wall. We leave a window open about 1/4 of an inch and the roof vent also cracked 1/4 of an inch.ventilation comment
EDIT: added ventilation comment
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