No cooking or toilets. - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 04-17-2010, 08:05 PM   #15
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Name: lee
Trailer: trailswest campsterl, 1996 Scamp 16 foot
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Well I just had to chime in on the toilet situation. We have had numerous trailers ( 12 or so over about 40 years of camping ) most of them had toilets, our current 13 foot Uhaul does not. Admittedly a regular toilet in your trailer is a convenience but there is much to be said for not having one. If you do a lot of boondocking or winter camping a porta potty can be a asset. When boondocking you can throw the porta potty in the back of the truck and dump it in any forest service outdoor privy ( These privys outnumber RV dump sites easily 20 to 1 ) whereas when the the holding tank on the regular toilet fills up it is either go home or hook on to the trailer and drive perhaps serveral miles to the nearest RV dump ( and it is often many miles to that RV dump ). When winter camping there is no worry about the porta potty freezing whereas the holding tank is a concern. My wife and I have come to actually prefer the porta potty solution. We have also removed our stove for the following reasons, one obviously more counter space, two if it is really cold outside we will probably be in a campground with electricity and our electric skillet and microwave meet our cooking needs, and lastly if it is really hot out it is way to hot to add cooking heat to the small trailer so we cook outside on our portable coleman grill/stove. Certainly not saying that everyone should pitch the toilet and stove but for some it can be quite workable. Lee and Norma
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Old 04-17-2010, 08:17 PM   #16
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Name: Marjie
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Hi,
OK, another opinion....
After years of NO bathroom facilities a porta potty is our luxury.
I agree with you...for us, the sink in the boler is really too small. a bathroom not necessary, and the stove is nice for really foul weather, but not necessary.
We still tent camp, but the adirondack weather is often cold and wet even in summer, so the bed is nice.
Marjie
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Old 04-17-2010, 11:57 PM   #17
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I won't comment on the, digging a hole other than to say isn't that technically illegal?
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Old 04-18-2010, 06:03 AM   #18
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We currently have an '83 Scamp 13 that we use extensively when camping. It's nice not to have to set up and break down camp (too much). We do set up a screen house for cooking and eating when the bugs are a problem. We do not use the sink, stove or fridge. In fact we store stuff in the fridge and the sink is a catch-all. We have the porta potty, but it would be so nice to have a bathroom. That's the only thing I miss.
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Old 04-18-2010, 09:42 AM   #19
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Well I just had to chime in on the toilet situation. We have had numerous trailers ( 12 or so over about 40 years of camping ) most of them had toilets, our current 13 foot Uhaul does not. Admittedly a regular toilet in your trailer is a convenience but there is much to be said for not having one. If you do a lot of boondocking or winter camping a porta potty can be a asset. When boondocking you can throw the porta potty in the back of the truck and dump it in any forest service outdoor privy ( These privys outnumber RV dump sites easily 20 to 1 ) whereas when the the holding tank on the regular toilet fills up it is either go home or hook on to the trailer and drive perhaps serveral miles to the nearest RV dump ( and it is often many miles to that RV dump ). When winter camping there is no worry about the porta potty freezing whereas the holding tank is a concern. My wife and I have come to actually prefer the porta potty solution. We have also removed our stove for the following reasons, one obviously more counter space, two if it is really cold outside we will probably be in a campground with electricity and our electric skillet and microwave meet our cooking needs, and lastly if it is really hot out it is way to hot to add cooking heat to the small trailer so we cook outside on our portable coleman grill/stove. Certainly not saying that everyone should pitch the toilet and stove but for some it can be quite workable. Lee and Norma
It seems that you have forgotten about totes... even this 12 gallon one will empty a full Scamp blackwater tank and fit in the back of the truck with ease.
[b] http://tinyurl.com/y6xe7le

A simple stove cover will give back the "extra" counter space and we even engineered ours to lock into the drawer to serve as more table or counter space when cooking or serving with the bed made.
We've had all levels, and settled on having every convenience, we started with simple and worked our way up. My advice would be NOT to remove anything already supplied with the trailer until you find that you haven't used it for a season or two.
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Old 04-19-2010, 09:36 AM   #20
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Thank you all for the many suggestions and ideas. The gutting is done. On to the next phase.

Robin, when in the wild with no toilet nearby, one has two options: dig and burry (8 inches) or bag it. The former is not illegal however hikers and campers alike are asked to respect and follow park regulations for environmental reasons amongst others.

Leave No Trace (http://www.lnt.org/) outlines those and many other rules/guidelines for the safe and environmentally-friendly disposal of various items in the outdoors.
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Old 04-19-2010, 10:09 AM   #21
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Trailer: 1974 Boler 13 ft (Neonex/Winnipeg)
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There's one thing missing here Photos!

Can't wait to see what you come up with, Fab.

Raya

PS: Yes, on the "disposal" of human waste, there are many different acceptable ways. Some depend on the locale. For example, when I was boating on the Salmon river, we were to #1 in the river (arid climate - this is better ecologically), and #2 was into a pickle bucket with a slake of lime - the buckets were carried out and disposed of later. In other places, it's perfectly acceptable to dig an appropriate hole and bury. Etc.

Actually, if the siting is correctly done, I think a good-old-fashioned outhouse can be very low impact (and pleasant) - not that you'd bring one along camping, but the individual dig-and-bury is the portable version of that. A Porta-pottie and chemicals are perfectly legal and acceptable, but I'm not sure they're totally low impact in an environmental sense. I don't mean like people shouldn't use them, but just that "primitive" methods aren't always worse or bad.
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Old 04-19-2010, 10:58 AM   #22
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Actually I am not so modern ways are the best ways, I understand that diposing of waste properly is probably a better solution than the chemicals. But it was my understanding that it is illegal to do so on most public land.

Not that I will ever hang my hinney over a hole in the ground, I prefer my bathroom. But what ever works for the individual.
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Old 04-19-2010, 01:08 PM   #23
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Robin,

You're probably right in that people should check into the rules in various places. I'm guessing there is not one "public" standard rule for everywhere, as there are many public land districts and types, but I don't know for sure.

Because I had mentioned the Salmon River, I looked up their guidelines. The River is part of the Salmon-Challis National Forest. They actually recommend the shovel method. Here is what they had to say [emboldenment mine]:

Leave No Trace:
More important than regulations are the responsibilities each traveler has to protect the Wilderness. It is necessary for all users of the FC-RONRW to practice minimum impact camping techniques. The motivation to do this derives from a respect for the land and water and consideration and courtesy for those who will follow after you. Fundamental principles and techniques have been developed using the “Leave No Trace” philosophy. A complete narrative and description for all of the principles can be found on the numerous “Leave No Trace” websites. Listed below are some of the most critical practices
[Note: I have only pasted in the human waste section, but there is a link to this page below]:

* Be responsible for human waste. Carry a small shovel or trowel to help dispose of human feces. When traveling overland, bury feces. When floating the rivers, use the required sealed portable toilets and pack them out.

Since we were on the river, we used the "sealed portable toilets," which at that time were 5-gallon buckets with an additional seal of duct tape around the lid (to keep the lid from getting accidentally pried off after they were full). But I see that on land they recommend the small shovel and burying for #2.

http://www.fs.fed.us/r4/sc/fcronr/fcronrindex.shtml

They do make it sound like this is part of a greater, accepted "Leave no Trace" philosophy. When I was last doing this it was pre-Internet, so not so easy to look these things up.

Interesting discussion
Raya
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Old 04-21-2010, 02:24 PM   #24
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Okay, we just got our used Scamp 16' and will be renovating (complete.) We don't want a sink, toilet or gas burner included. We still like the outdoor cooking and so forth, so I was wondering if anyone here has done a restoration without those items. We like clean and spacious (as much as you can get in a 16' trailer.)

Thanks.

My solution to your problem was to buy a new one aka 2008 16ft Scamp. I have been doing wilderness tripping/camping with my young daughters and a pair of Boykin spainels for several years now. For safety .. I keep all food related items and the kitchen in my truck. Another advantage is shedding a lot of trailer weight as mine weighs quite a bit less than 2000lbs. But check on [b]trailer brake regulations on the areas you intend to travel. I did install a brake controller. The truck with four wheel discs doesnt seem to need it .. but. Never crossed my mind about the trowel, I cant imagine any state requiring canoest to carry out that or take a porti-potti. But I have seen way to many TP daisies on some routes.

Good luck

scouter bill
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Old 04-23-2010, 07:55 PM   #25
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Leave No Trace (http://www.lnt.org/) outlines those and many other rules/guidelines for the safe and environmentally-friendly disposal of various items in the oudoors.
Hi
Since you arrived to portapotty idea as I did you may find useful that Cabelas carries non-toxic biodegradable deodorant for portapotties and alike. There is also a seat for plain 5g buckets.

scouterbill - food related items and the kitchen in the truck?

Hmmmm... I can (most likely/possibly) live with a bear damaging my camper, especially while I'm out of camp site. But an idea to walk 30-40 miles back if the truck is damaged just doesn't lay good with me...

Anyway the best bet is to store food away from both vehicle and camper, IMHO.
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Old 04-25-2010, 11:38 AM   #26
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I think so.
Each brake will have TWO wires hanging out the back of the drums.
  • One is 12 volt power, and needs to be connected to the BLUE wire coming from the 7-pin plug, which is the output from the brake controller in the tow vehicle.
  • The other is "Ground" or "Return" and is usually connected (white wire in my picture) to the frame of the trailer at a point close to that brake drum.
Hi Frederick, are those bias ply tires in your photo? Just curious..
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Old 04-25-2010, 11:56 AM   #27
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Hi Frederick, are those bias ply tires in your photo? Just curious..
6 ply Radials
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