Plugging in trailer at home - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 02-09-2009, 12:24 PM   #15
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I think that's a male thing.
Wanting "more power" down below.
Bimford did not exist when most of us were born.
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Old 02-09-2009, 07:51 PM   #16
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I recommend you be SURE any electrician you hire is clear on the difference between a 30A/120VAC RV power circuit and a 30A/240VAC home power circuit, because the first one is rare and I would guess that many electricians have gone their entire career without having seen one unless they are campers.

I would also be sure that the electrician is bonded and insured in case he/she thinks they know the difference and don't...
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Old 02-09-2009, 10:43 PM   #17
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Thank you for posting that Pete,
As a non - electrician camper,
I don't feel so stupid for not knowing the difference.
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Old 02-09-2009, 10:56 PM   #18
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Hi: All...We can't all be ex spurt at everything...can we??? I always say "If it can be done wrong...I can do it". What galls me is paying a pro to do a job and find out THEY did it wrong!!!
Alf S. North shore of Lake Erie p.s. back to your regularly scheduled forum.
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Old 02-10-2009, 06:30 AM   #19
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Too be sure how your insurance company would handle any catastrophe if something in the electrical system/panel goes wrong and you damage your home (fire?). I know my insurance carrier would abandon me if I have work done (or do it myself). License/bonded/insured and documented can save a lot of heartache.

I'd think ahead. More is better when it comes to power. You may find that trailer makes a perfect guest house and your guests would be more comfortable using all the amenities. Make sure you can power all of the stuff...

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Old 02-10-2009, 02:03 PM   #20
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Thanks again, Pete. Your information is an example of exactly why as a FGRV newbie I appreciate this forum so much. The "difference" issue is now at the top of my TT file.

Bruce Wray
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Old 02-10-2009, 02:53 PM   #21
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This exact problem happened to a fellow Casita camper friend of mine. He went to visit his daughter who had an "electrician" put in a 30 amp plug for him to hook up to when visiting. Well it fried just about everything in his system when he tried to plug in and sparks flew. What happened? The verdict came in that it was 220 not 120.
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Old 02-10-2009, 06:16 PM   #22
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I wouldn't set too much blame on the electrician. Most 30 amp circuits are used to power electric driers, hot tubs, welders and the like, most of which use 220v, not 110v AC. 30A 110 appliances are pretty rare.

As far as I know RVs, on the other hand, use 110v hookups.

Electrical wiring in your home isn't beyond the capabilities of a knowledgeable and experienced do-it-yourselfer. I'm no electrician, but I've installed everything from 220V 50-amp circuits to a hot tub on down to 110v 15-amp outlets and lights, all done with building permits, inspections, and sign-offs.

When it comes to home electrical wiring the key words in the last paragraph are "knowledgeable" and "experienced." Unless you have both and are willing and able to go through the electrical permitting process, I'd suggest calling in a professional to do the job. In this economy it should be easy to find a pros willing to take on a small job, too.

Working your way through the permit process is important in two ways. First, inspectors are doubly careful about inspecting a do-it-yourselfer electrical project, insisting that it be done in a competent, professional manner and likely catching any errors you may have made. Second, once the project is signed off you can take that permit paperwork to your insurance company or future home buyer if any questions come up about your work to prove it was done right.

Which brings us back to being knowledgeable and experienced. Building inspectors have little patience for people who don't know what they're doing.
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Old 02-11-2009, 08:37 AM   #23
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Don't over-think this.

Go find a 30 amp to 15 amp dog-bone adaptor at Wall-Mart (or wherever you like to shop for RV supplies) and plug your trailer into an ordinary household power outlet. This is plenty sufficient to charge your battery.

I leave my Scamp plugged in all the time when at home, and I even use this to run my A/C when a 30 amp RV outlet is not available. The only caveat I can think of is to be sure to check the water level in the battery monthly.

-- Dan Meyer
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Old 02-11-2009, 08:51 AM   #24
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Don't over-think this.

Go find a 30 amp to 15 amp dog-bone adaptor at Wall-Mart (or wherever you like to shop for RV supplies) and plug your trailer into an ordinary household power outlet. This is plenty sufficient to charge your battery.

I leave my Scamp plugged in all the time when at home, and I even use this to run my A/C when a 30 amp RV outlet is not available. The only caveat I can think of is to be sure to check the water level in the battery monthly.

-- Dan Meyer
I agree with Dan.
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Old 02-11-2009, 03:36 PM   #25
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My question is (being the rookie that I am) -- What's a dog bone adapter? A description would help.
Thanks,
Bruce
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Old 02-11-2009, 05:09 PM   #26
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Bruce,
Good question which may serve to help educate others also.
A dog-bone adapter kind of looks like a dog bone in shape. One end may have a male 50 amp plug, and the other a female 30 amp socket connected with 6" to 8" of about 5/8" thick (typically yellow in color) electrical cable. I've seen adapters which eliminate the cable portion and it's all one molded unit.

Hope this helps,
Kurt & Ann K.
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Old 02-11-2009, 07:01 PM   #27
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Quote:
A dog-bone adapter kind of looks like a dog bone in shape. One end may have a male 50 amp plug, and the other a female 30 amp socket connected with 6" to 8" of about 5/8" thick (typically yellow in color) electrical cable. I've seen adapters which eliminate the cable portion and it's all one molded unit.
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