Putting Together a Tool Kit - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 04-23-2007, 08:31 PM   #15
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I had no idea that Gina watched me change oil..

Anyway, Part of a tool kit, most important,
2 ounces Bourbon whiskey
1 capful Vermouth
several ice cubes
2- Marischino cherries.

maybe some coke.
Hi: Bourbon and branch is far less weight to carry Secret is Never add water to Bourbon Add Bourbon to water It improves the water
Alf S. North shore of Lake Erie p.s. try Old Haven Hill Kentucky Bourbon smooth
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Old 04-24-2007, 05:48 AM   #16
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--><div class='quotemain'>
I am a relative newby at this. What may I ask is the rivet gun used mostly for? And what specific typr of gun do you suggest?
[/quote]

Everything is riveted through the shell on my Scamp...from tailights to vents to cabinets. I use a Stanley MR77C Swivel Head. They're all over eBay, some with Buy-It-Now for less than $10...just watch out for the shipping costs.
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Old 04-24-2007, 09:24 AM   #17
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Everything is riveted through the shell on my Scamp...from tailights to vents to cabinets. I use a Stanley MR77C Swivel Head. They're all over eBay, some with Buy-It-Now for less than $10...just watch out for the shipping costs.
ours is a 2006 16 ft side dinette, was one of 2 on the lot after the factory caught fire and burned down that were unsold. I think I may have a use for the rivet gun already.
Thanks for the info.
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Old 04-26-2007, 11:11 PM   #18
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A tool kit...my favorite subject----

Wow! I had to go out and look at what we actually have drug around with us for a number of years. It seems we do some in our case of field repairs but are always offering something to some one else in camp. Being an old Boy Scout--the motto is "Be Prepared".

Too many people dont carry enough to even replace fuses or lost bolts and nuts, or to fix a minor leak...but that is only my viewpoint--we boondock a lot and being equipped to fix most common repairs is second nature.

But for some folks all of that is way too over the top--Like Donna, a AAA card and a Visa card are more that adequate.

But since this thread is for a Tool Kit--and there are some really well prepared folks out there...here is our bag of stuff....

Always in the tug, or both of them in our case is a full set of auto tools, wrenches, both SAE and metric, pliers--needle nose, wire cutters, water pump and slip joint, wire ties, hose clamps of different sizes, ignition wrenches both SAE and metric. sockets up to 7/8 or 23 MM in metric and SAE, screwdrivers phillips and regular, drift pins and a punch or two, crescent wrenches, a small hammer, round and mill bastard files, a small hacksaw, a prybar or two, a pipe or two of bigger conduit (1 1/4 inch by 1.5 feet) for more leverage on socket wrenches, duct tape, baling wire--steel, not iron, 4 way lug wrench, hydraulic jack and the original screw jack, electrical tape, a plastic tarp to lay on if necessary and a few cotton rags in a ziplock bag. Don't forget several types of lighting, headlamps, flashlights..etc.

All of this only weighs about twenty five pounds and fits in a canvas tool bag, under the rear seats. Add jumper cables, a 12v volt air compressor, some tire plugs, fuses, a couple of standard bulbs to fit tug and trailer and most of that is covered. I have a few feet of different colored wire of different guages, a few common short pieces of hose, 1/2 and 3/8 inch, air and water, with a handful of common 3/8 gas and flare fittings with a piece of 3/8 copper tubing and a flare tool. (why carry the flare tool in the trailer? it is the only place it is needed)

Some wire nuts, and crimps, and a new tube of caulk--clear paintable silicone. A small tube of wheel bearing grease, a spare set of correct size wheel bearings with races, with a few screws, nails, nuts and assorted bolts, a spare lug nut and stud or two.

An axe, a bow saw, a broom and short gardening shovel and we can take on the world.

Overall weight of the the whole kit? maybe considering what is in the tug and trailer? less than thirty five pounds---or about the weight of the wife's weekend bag!

OH! Almost forgot--plenty of batteries for all kinds of lights and a good bottle of merlot and some 25 year old single malt scotch for thinking fluid.



Good luck on your kit---

Garo
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Old 04-27-2007, 12:52 PM   #19
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We've got the Merlot and Scotch in our kit like Garo, so I think we're over halfway there. That way if something breaks we won't care....

I did remove all rivets and replace with stainless steel bolts and nuts per Con's thread, so a Phillips head and 3/8" wrench will take care of 90% of what we'd run into now. Stocking the rest of the kit with wire ties, lubes, caulk(non-silicone), electrical items and the tire changing necessities. If it's anything major beyond that then the Merlot and Scotch come into play...
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Old 04-27-2007, 07:46 PM   #20
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Hi: I found a handy tool kit @ Ikea... It contains a small adjustable wrench/claw hammer/ 11 screwdriver/allen key bits and handle and a pair of pliers in a plastic carry case!!! All for $9.95 Canadian dollars. I couldn't resist it Alf S. North shore of Lake Erie
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Old 04-28-2007, 11:39 AM   #21
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Long plastic zip ties are useful. Also, a tube of lithium grease for the hitch ball. And a Swedish splitting axe for firewood.

Tip from this old backpacker: 152 proof rum saves weight and space, goes great in hot chocolate (and even a tbsp. of it packs a wallop at higher altitudes!).

Oh - almost forgot - I always pack a US Army folding trenching tool. It takes up very little space and is useful for leveling sites, leveling a spot for the step in from of the door, dousing campfires, cleaning up sites, etc. But be sure to buy the genuine government-issue article, which is very well made and durable ; the commercial copies are pretty junky.
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Old 04-29-2007, 06:15 PM   #22
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People are going to scoff at me but I always travel with a few 6010 welding rods sealed tightly in an airtight tube (I made one out of ABS pipe and some fittings I had around). It takes up hardly any room or weight and cost about $.20 each; and I always have good jumper cables in each vehicle anyway, so you can weld things together when, for example, the frame on your trailer cracks and breaks, or you break a spring shackle, etc... You won't make pretty welds but you'll get home.
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Old 04-30-2007, 08:09 AM   #23
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People are going to scoff at me but I always travel with a few 6010 welding rods sealed tightly in an airtight tube (I made one out of ABS pipe and some fittings I had around). It takes up hardly any room or weight and cost about $.20 each; and I always have good jumper cables in each vehicle anyway, so you can weld things together when, for example, the frame on your trailer cracks and breaks, or you break a spring shackle, etc... You won't make pretty welds but you'll get home.
Herb; could you elaborate a bit on this... perhaps as a topic in "owners helping owners". This seems to be a handy thing to know how to do!

Regards
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Old 04-30-2007, 08:31 AM   #24
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Herb; could you elaborate a bit on this... perhaps as a topic in "owners helping owners". This seems to be a handy thing to know how to do!

Regards
Here's a page describes emergency welding pretty well.

Anyone who is going to consider doing this should really practice on their driveway a couple of times. Your other option is to just carry the supplies with you and if something ever happens, you might luck out and find an experienced welder or old farmer at the campground or driving by on the road who'd be willing to do the weld for you but doesn't carry his/her own supplies ...

You will also likely want to carry some files or other methods of grinding... If you're welding something, it needs to be mostly free of paint and rust at the break or else (worst case) you won't strike an arc or (best case) get a poor weld.

Myself, I carry a Ready Welder around but they're a few hundred dollars and certainly overkill for the average RVer. If I was a boondocker though .....
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Old 05-01-2007, 04:37 AM   #25
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I carry a bottle jack and a four-way tire speed wrench.
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Funny that Roger would be the first posting on this thread.
The whole of last year I was confident with my tool kit of 3/8 drive sockets, set of American and metric open end wrenches, verious electrial connectors, and tools but...
when I went to take the tires off to replace them yesterday I realized that I didn't have a lug wrench in the camper...
I suppose one of the sockets would have fit but if the lugs were real tight the small handle of the sockets set would have been useless.
I now have the 4-way wrench in with the jacks and it will stay there.
Gerry the canoebuilder
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Old 05-01-2007, 07:37 AM   #26
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Gerry,

That is why years ago I put a couple of cheater bars in the tug. They are pieces of steel EMT electrical conduit, big enough to go over the ratchet handle and increase leverage.

You can take a 3/8 drive ratchet and generate enough force with a foot and half ot two feet piece of pipe over your ratchet to loosen even the toughest lug nuts or springe bolts or what ever. With a 1/2 inch drive set you can keep the trailer ball tight with the right socket.

Garo
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Old 05-01-2007, 04:51 PM   #27
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Rather than use a "cheater bar", I carry (and use in my garage) a 1/2" drive breaker bar, similar to (for instance) Husky model 24231. It fulfills the same function as a cheater of providing increased leverage than a typical ratchet handle (because it's longer), is very durable (because it doesn't have the ratchet assembly), and I think it's safer than a cheater.

I carry sockets to fit both the trailer's (and tug's) wheel nuts, and the hitch ball nut, and both are easily handled with the breaker bar.

In my experience, a "cheater bar" (which is normally actually a pipe, not a solid bar) is called a "snipe", but in searching the web today I realize that this is apparently an unusual usage; maybe it's a local thing...
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Old 05-01-2007, 07:42 PM   #28
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Rather than use a "cheater bar", I carry (and use in my garage) a 1/2" drive breaker bar,
In my experience, a "cheater bar" (which is normally actually a pipe, not a solid bar) is called a "snipe", but in searching the web today I realize that this is apparently an unusual usage; maybe it's a local thing...
nah, I also call them a 'snipe'. I also throw away those 4 way tire irons (lug nut rounding devices) and equip all of my vehicles with a breaker bar and appropriate socket(s) (for truck and trailer lugnuts as applicable).. I've confirmed that my small wife can undo a correctly torqued lugnut using the breaker bar and that's good enough for me.

Oh, and don't forget to anti-seize your lugnuts once in a while. Too many people put too much effort into checking their wheel bearings every year but never maintain their studs and lugnuts.
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