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Old 02-13-2003, 11:51 AM   #1
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repairing cracks

Hello - HERE ARE THE PICTURES OF THE DAMAGE AT THIS WEBSITE: http://www.eyepopdesign.com/scamp.htm

I was sent over here from the nice folks on the scamp Yahoo user group. I have two questions:

1) What product do I use to clean the grime before I get to repairing and waxing (or painting)

2) And what would be the simplest way to repair wear cracks on the exterior of a scamp that otherwise has no other major damage?
(I've been reading the fiberglass repair threads - they all sound like more than I would want to tackle)

OH, Forgot to mention, the previous owner had a TV antenna installed on the roof - we want to remove it - so I suppose we are looking at a fiberglass repair there? Thanks in advance

1984 13' SCAMP
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Old 02-13-2003, 02:04 PM   #2
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Welcome!

:wave Glad to have you on board.

We have several people on here who have done things from restoring finishes to some pretty big glass repairs. Just hang on, they'll be around.

Meantime, we do have a great seach feature that really works well (Top right tab). From dull to shiney, cracked to whole.

Any pictures that you can post here might also help us help you. We LOVE before and after pictures. Heck, we just like pictures!

You've come to the right place!
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Old 02-13-2003, 02:36 PM   #3
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glass repairs

Before I say anything else I would like to point out that I was (and remain) a complete novice at glass repairs. I'm sure I didn't do things the 'right' way - but it plugged the holes...

Cleaning:
I had to remove a bunch of old paint. Used a scraper for the paint, plus plenty of good old soap and water with a stiff brush to get off years of crud.

Another major point: I was planning on painting the outside of mine anyway. IMHO that means that I didn't necc. need to make the repairs be 'pretty', they just needed to be relatively smooth.

For large holes - I started by gluing a thick plastic sheet on the backside of the wall that covered the hole. The hole was then patched with fiberglass cloth and resin (lots of it). That was sanded down as smooth as possible. Remaining dips and valleys were filled with body putty, then sanded smooth. For smaller holes (1/4" max) I skipped the backing plate and fiberglass and just used body putty.

For REALLY small 'holes' (pitting in the gelcoat), I smeared gelcoat repair material into them. I also used the gelcoat repair extensively inside the Boler to fix the many small holes and points of damage to the various bits of glass furnishings.

When all was said and done - I sanded it down to scuff up the surface - then primed and painted using Rustoleum (rolled on). Doesn't give the perfectly smooth finish it would have originally had - but that has the advantage of covering up the fact that not all my repairs were perfectly smooth either. :) I was interested in making something that was USEFUL and presentable, without being a show quality. Is short - it's more of a remodel than a restoration.

I'm sure there will be more responses here that are much more particular and precise. They are undoutedly also the "correct" way to do the repair. However - I didn't want to take it to a pro shop and also had a good idea of what my skills and limitations were. I did what I felt I was capable of, that accomplished my primary goals.

mkw
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Old 02-13-2003, 02:50 PM   #4
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Hi Renee!

Welcome aboard! Lots of good folks here ... folks who've done wonderful restorations ... so I'm sure a lot of then will chime in!

>>fiberglass repair

Are you planning on painting the outside? Or are you trying to just clean up and polish the gel coat?

What kind of cracks do you have? Structural or just some "spider webbing?"

Boat stores and catalogs have numerous products for cleaning and repairing fiberglass.

Afterall, if it's good for a fiberglass boat in the water, it's great for your little fiberglass trailer.

The boat stores have spider-web and gel-coat repair kits ... and if you go to your local store now (in the winter), they'll have time to talk to you about your respective problem.

>>filling holes

Mike's right on the money for filling holes. If you are not painting, but trying to repair/polish the existing gel coat, your final coat on your hole patch will have to be gel-coat ... and you'll probably have to "blend" the color a little to make it match.

Again, boat stores ... or do a web search for "West Marine" online. West Marine will send you a catalog ... but they also have loads of fiberglass and gel coat repair tips and products.

Can you post some pictures so we can see what your project entails?
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Old 02-13-2003, 03:23 PM   #5
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fixn an egg

Welcome.

You will have to do some looking back through previous threads using the search function, but you will find pictures and explanations galore.

As mentioned before try to take some pictures and give a little more detail on what you would like to do.

:wave
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Old 02-13-2003, 09:49 PM   #6
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THANKS!
I will grab the camera tomorrow and get some closeups to you pronto so you can see exactly what I am up against.

Question:

When you patch these so-called "dents" or dimples - has anyone experienced your repair medium "popping-out" of such a shallow dip?

Renee from Iowa
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Old 02-13-2003, 10:27 PM   #7
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Renee

Welcome to this forum.Lots of great ideas and help here.:wave
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Old 02-13-2003, 11:36 PM   #8
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Welcome Renee

I agree that you need to visit a marine supply store and check out the material available to you. On your first visit buy a quart of acetone to clean the fiberglass with. Acetone is to fiberglas what paint thinner is to oil base paint. (CAUTION Read the label) You are going to need a lot of it. The first thing is to clean a lot of the old grit and grim off of the dull finish. It is going to remove all of the wax off the area to be repaired. The repairs are going to be the same as above the water line boat repair. You will find this is a good source for supplies and advice. Read a lot of the labels on the cans of resin, gel coat, and repair kits. You will learn a lot even from the ones that you don't buy. Also discuss some of the type repairs you wish to make with anyone and everyone in the store. A good fiberglass repair person (notice I didn't say man) may be standing next to you in the store.

First you must decide if you are going to paint the trailer or repair the fiberglas and gel coat. The repairs are done pretty much the same for both. But after the repairs are finished the next step is different. If you are going to paint then it all should be sanded and then painted. But if you are going to repair the gel coat you should leave the repaired area about 1/16 inch low. Then clean the area with acetone and apply gel coat to the repaired area. After it has cured 24 hrs then sand smooth reducing to finer and finer grit paper. After it is worked down to shape then use fiberglas buffing compound to get the shine.

For dents and scratches, if they are shallow just repair with gel coat. If they are deep, fill with marine tex to just below level and let it cure 24 hrs. Then fill up with gel coat. When the gel coat cures sand and rub out with compound. What keeps it from popping out is to clean it well with acetone before and between each step.

I put together a 32 ft fiberglass sail boat several years ago and sailed it for twelve years. It is still being sailed by the doctor that I sold it to. All of my fiberglas work is still holding together. Ketch Mistress is the ripe old age of 33 now.
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Old 02-14-2003, 08:52 AM   #9
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Ron

Thank you, thank you, thank you! And did I say thank you?

I have a place that I need to gel coat (and a few others that wouldn't hurt). I have read, searched, and tried to understand just how to do it. You, on the otherhand, in one writing, finally made it clear for me!

Once the weather improves, I am going to be on this in a flash. No doubt that I will be successful, thanks to you.
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Old 02-14-2003, 08:57 AM   #10
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Ron

Just in case you are wondering, I think it was that you didn't say too much, but just enough. Since I don't have a clue about this stuff, I always got bogged down in the details.

Thanks for putting it so straight forward and simply.
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Old 02-14-2003, 09:04 AM   #11
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Marine-tex

Ron, doesn't that stuff get extremely hard when it cures? Do you have any tips for handling it, getting it as smooth as possible before it sets up? I realize you cover it with gel coat afterwards, but seems like the smoother the better to start with.

We made a very poor repair on a boat, using Marine-tex (some years ago). I would've loved to have had some advice prior to working with that stuff. We had no idea it would set up so hard. We found it almost impossible to sand it smooth.

I think I'm thinking of Marine-tex... :o
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Old 02-14-2003, 03:48 PM   #12
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Fiberglas repair

Thanks Suz, Mary, marine-tex does set up very hard and is hard to sand. I use an electric grinder in areas where I can. You must be careful and not allow it to get hot. In other areas tape a piece of cardboard over the area. This will keep it smooth until it cures.

Renee, I don't know how large the hole for the antenna is. But for holes larger than a half inch I chopped up fiberglas cloth and mixed it in the marine-tex to add strength. (the same thing is done to concrete to add strength)

Caution! Read the instructions on the can. To much hardner can cause fire. It will get warm as it cures.
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Old 02-14-2003, 04:54 PM   #13
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Just in case you missed it...

...Renee edited her first post and put a link that shows the damage to her trailer.

:thumb Good job, Renee!

Ron....check it out...whadaya think?
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Old 02-14-2003, 04:56 PM   #14
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If anyone missed it, my fiberglass damage pictures are at this website: http://www.eyepopdesign.com/scamp.htm
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