So many confusing choices for newbies - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-14-2007, 09:33 PM   #15
Member
 
Trailer: No Trailer Yet
Posts: 45
Lots of good points made above.

Re: A Sprinter motor home

Given the amount of money required going this way is kind of an all-or-nothing shot so I have some reservations about that route. Having read the posts on "Van Conversion RVs" on another forum, I learned that most owners were pretty satisfied except in one area--storage. Since those things are rated to tow 5,000 pounds, I think they could easiy resolve that problem by buying and pulling along one of those small storage boxes of the kind you see at U-hall.

One posts mentioned hooking up and unhooking as the main problem with this route once at a campground. Does that take long?

Some RV lots seem to require a motorhome and something like a Sprinter would qualify whereas trailers wouldn't (maybe that goes for Park homes as well?). I think I understand why they have such restrictions.

Re: Donna's post on 5th wheel Scamp

You mention that the average owner of such trailers spends lots of time outdoors. You know, I was forgetting about that. Basically, with a decent awning and outdoor table (I suppose most campgrounds have them), you've got the biggest living room in the world when you think about it. And when you are reading or sleeping inside, how much space do you need?

It's helpful to know about the 6 cubic foot refrigerator option too. Since we like to cook, that's a concern. My main concern with a small 5th wheel, as opposed to a trailer towed by a SUV or by a pickup with tonneau cover is that some of the things I'd like to take along for cooking are a bit bulky (food processor, pressure cooker) so I don't know if they fit in a small 5th.

By the way, how do the 15 to 17 foot trailers compare to the 19ft Scamp for amenities?

re: $25 K Escape trailer (Alf S)

Is that the Escape 5.0 which is the only 5th I could find at the site? If so, basically it's the same length as the Scamp but a bit more expensive. Why then do you prefer it over the Scamp?

I gather from other things I've read that the Bigfoots are nice but very expensive and heavier (meaning they'd probably require a 2500 diesel). I don't know if we'd spend that much on an RV until we've had some experience but it's something to keep in mind for later.
__________________

__________________
Frank G. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2007, 06:24 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
Alf S.'s Avatar
 
Name: Alfred
Trailer: 2014 Escape 5.0TA / 2010 Nissan Frontier
Ontario
Posts: 3,816
Registry
Send a message via Yahoo to Alf S.
Hi: Looking at close up photos of the construction quality thanks to Brian BP and the more modern aero. shape and my buy Canadian passion Escape seems to offer more bang for their/MY buck...not to mention they use a plate hitch as do most 5er's... Scamp doesn't When I wake up from this nightmare called work and can retire to the road I only hope that both these units are avail. so I can snag one or tuther I think a small fifth of anything is a good thing...and a replacable V6 pickup a good Tug...What else can I say " I am hooked" Alf S. North shore of lake Erie
__________________

__________________
Alf S. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2007, 06:37 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
Roger H's Avatar
 
Name: Roger
Trailer: Y2K6 Born Free 32RQ on the Kodiak chassis, 1995 Coachmen 19' B-van and 1996 Precision 21' Sailboat
Iowa
Posts: 5,000
Quote:
Lots of good points made above.


One posts mentioned hooking up and unhooking as the main problem with this route once at a campground. Does that take long?

It's helpful to know about the 6 cubic foot refrigerator option too.

By the way, how do the 15 to 17 foot trailers compare to the 19ft Scamp for amenities?

I gather from other things I've read that the Bigfoots are nice but very expensive and heavier (meaning they'd probably require a 2500 diesel). I don't know if we'd spend that much on an RV until we've had some experience but it's something to keep in mind for later.
Frank, a couple of points... you seem to be all over the map with your thoughts about your wants/needs. Spend a little time roaming around RV lots. Look at the mohos and stick-built trailers and figure out what appeals to you and what doesn't. All trailers and mohos have basically the same appliances and amenities. Some have more room and storage, some layouts appeal to some folks more than others.
Spend some time in them and think about where you'd put 'stuff'. Figure out what 'stuff' you'll really want to take along and what 'stuff' is really insignificant. If your main pleasure in life is cooking, you probably don't want an RV unless creative cooking in a cramped space on a two or three burner stove and a campfire is really what you're into. The Scamp 5th wheel and Bigfoot trailers all have the large fridge as an option. It's one of the things I enjoy about ours. I don't know if Escape plans on using the larger fridge in their 5th wheel, but I can't imagine that they won't.

Then, watch for a fiberglass gathering and go tour all of the units that attend. You'll quickly have an idea what will suit you and what won't.

You also have some misconceptions, apparently, about the relative weights and how much vehicle you really need to tow some of these trailers. Although I have an Excursion that I usually tow my 25' Bigfoot with, it is a holdover from the 34' Airstream. I have and will tow my 25' Bigfoot occasionally around here locally with my 3.4l 6cyl Tundra pickup. It's competent to pull the trailer with an empty, as-equipped curb weight of 5300 lbs., although it's rated for just slightly less because of the engine. The same truck in a V8 is rated at 6500 lbs. It's the largest (and heaviest) molded fiberglass trailer made today that I know of. Pretty much any half-ton chassis vehicle with a V8 has more than enough tow capacity to tow it. A V8 Tundra, Ford F150, or 1500 Chevy or any 1/2 ton van would be a nearly ideal tow vehicle for the 25' Bigfoot and pretty much anything smaller.

If you go the moho route and need groceries or go sight-seeing after you're set up somewhere, you either need to tow a car along or break camp with the moho to go to the store. That means disconnecting all utilities, rolling up electrical cords and hoses, putting the awning up, securing everything in the moho and then setting up again on your return. Breaking camp gets tedious, and towing a car means that you have to hitch up and unhitch something anyway. THEN you have two drive trains to maintain as well.

Over the past twenty-five years and having had all manner and size of travel trailers, tent trailers, a fifth wheel Scamp, and a moho, I have found that for MY needs and wants a travel trailer is just about perfect.

Roger
__________________
Roger H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2007, 06:55 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
Lyndon Laney's Avatar
 
Name: Lyndon
Trailer: 1996 19 ft Scamp 19 ft 5th Wheel ('TOGETHERNEST' SLEEPS 8
Minnesota
Posts: 263
Lots of thoughts in the above posts , But I see no mention of the GREATLY reduced cost of licence and insurance. And refering to Donna's post we have 2 recliners in our 5er. We had a Winnibago LaShario and the licence and insurance was around $800 a year We now get by at $10.
__________________
Lyndon Laney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2007, 02:29 PM   #19
Member
 
Trailer: No Trailer Yet
Posts: 45
Re: You seem to be all over the map with your thoughts about your wants/needs.

You're right except in the area of staying "small" at first in any RV choice. I've ruled out anything on the big side for now. That could change with experience

COOKING ON THE ROAD: I gotta admit that I've spoiled myself and my wife. I don't want to given the impresson that I'm into fancy, multi-course, time-consuming meals, however. I'm amazed at how much "Gourmet light"stuff you can make quickly and easily--some tastier than things I've had in wel-regarded Philly restaruants. The trick lies in wilingness to do a little research and knowing how to spot such recipes when you encounter them. So far as "big" take alongs go, two things I'd like to bring are our pressure cooker (can double as a Dutch oven anyway) and our food processor--mainly because both save time and effort which seems a good idea on the road. They'll should fit easily in a large SUV, or the rear seat of a pickup so I don't see a problem.

re: Spend a little time roaming around RV lots.

Yes. We hope to this summer, though it's hard to find small fiberglass types locally except the Bigfoot I think. However, I think Scamp and others have been represented at the Hershey show in early September, supposedly one of the biggest in the country.
I'll also try to keep an eye out for a fibergass gathering.

I think I also need to look at some potential tow vehicles. If I go with a small fiberlass trailer, one I'd consider buying used certain-low used, low-mileage low depreciation vehicles that I could trade in on a bigger diesel later if we wanted bigger later. Among well-reviewed ones I'd consider are that Toyata and the Honda Ridgeline which tows 5,000 pounds (I don't know how its 5-foot bed would work with a Scamp 5th wheel). So far as 16-foot light fiberglass trailers go, a six-cylinder Toyata 4-Runner might do with its truck-based SUVs.

I recently read two articles concening tow vehicles that should interest most folks here. One concerns a decision by Japanese firms to halt planned production of heavy-duty pickups. The second concerns a small diesel engine from Chrysler. I'll post links shortly in the general chat forum.
__________________
Frank G. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2007, 03:13 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Roger H's Avatar
 
Name: Roger
Trailer: Y2K6 Born Free 32RQ on the Kodiak chassis, 1995 Coachmen 19' B-van and 1996 Precision 21' Sailboat
Iowa
Posts: 5,000
Quote:
re: Spend a little time roaming around RV lots.

Yes. We hope to this summer, though it's hard to find small fiberglass types locally except the Bigfoot I think.

I think I also need to look at some potential tow vehicles. Among well-reviewed ones I'd consider are that Toyata and the Honda Ridgeline which tows 5,000 pounds (I don't know how its 5-foot bed would work with a Scamp 5th wheel).
Don't worry about finding a fiberglass rv on a dealer's lot. The odds are overwhelmingly against you. What you will find there is inspiration among smaller stick-built trailers and they can give you an idea of what features you really want and don't want. If you can find one on a lot, it'll probably be a good deal because dealers price at NADA book. NADA book pricing is almost always way below market value on these trailers.

Once you have had the opportunity to look at lots and lots of stick-builts, then touring the fiberglass egg gatherings will have a lot more meaning as you'll really have a good idea of what you're comparing them to.

When you finally DO find a fiberglass RV you like, be it new or used, you'll have the education to decide on the spot whether or not that trailer is for you. You almost have to be ready to do that, because you typically don't get a second chance to go back and look at one again. Many sell here in hours of being listed, and most sell in less than a week. You have to be ready with cash in hand when you find "THE" trailer that's just what you're looking for. Many of us here have lost out on one or more trailers by hesitating; sometimes by minutes.

I'd also suggest that you really do your homework on tow vehicles as well; the Honda Ridgeline is reputed to be an excellent tow vehicle; but, it will not accept a fifth wheel hitch because of it's bed construction. There is also some question about one of the small pickups that uses a composite material for the bed as well; but I can't remember if it's the Tacoma or one of the other small trucks now...

Roger
__________________
Roger H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2007, 06:19 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
Brian B-P's Avatar
 
Name: Brian
Trailer: Boler (B1700RGH) 1979
Alberta
Posts: 5,000
A discussion of whether or not a composite (plastic) bed/box is a problem for a hitch can take a while... but I think the Ridgeline is effectively out for available trailers because the box sides are too high.

As for fiberglass trailer gatherings... there's a whole sub-forum here in the FiberglassRV forums...
Rallies, Get-togethers, Molded Meets
__________________
1979 Boler B1700RGH, pulled by 2004 Toyota Sienna LE 2WD
Information is good. Lack of information is not so good, but misinformation is much worse. Check facts, and apply common sense liberally.
STATUS: No longer active in forum.
Brian B-P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2007, 01:15 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
peterh's Avatar
 
Name: Peter
Trailer: 2005 19 ft Scamp 19 ft 5th Wheel
Oregon
Posts: 1,519
Registry
Hi Frank,

Reading the posts thus far it seems you really are "all over the map." I thought I'd throw my $0.02 in.

First off, I'm new with the RV/Trailer thing. My wife and I decided to get a trailer or RV last September, puttered around looking at RVs and trailers for a month or two, and one of the things we did was borrow my brother-in-law's "stickie" trailer and go to a fiberglass gathering. Two months later (December) we picked a used Scamp 5th wheel.

*** So my first advice is to look around and, if you're considering a small fiberglass trailer, show up at one of the events and ask the nice people ther if you can look inside their trailers. Most of them are happy to show them off, and after looking around we changed our minds as to what kind of RV/Trailer we wanted to buy.

We've had our trailer out twice since last March, and already I'm making changes, replacing the "gaucho" at the front of the trailer with drawers, a "hanging space" closet, dog kennel area, steps to the loft and a larger, front-to-back, queen-sized bed. We kinda planned on doing those things before we even found a trailer we wanted to buy, but never the less, it doesn't seem to take long before you start thinking "wouldn't it be nice if . . ."

*** Second advice: Buying used is a good way to go. RV market research says most first-time RV buyers trade their unit in within a year or two to get something they like better. Their first RV/trailer experiences help them figure out what things they really want in an RV/trailer. People who buy new loose a lot of cash when they go to sell or trade in that first unit; used trailers & RVs don't loose anywhere near as much value.

If you're patient you can get used fiberglass trailers in OK shape for just a few thousand dollars. Gina's older 13' trailer, for example, sold for $3000 and we bought our almost-new 2005 5th wheel for under 12K. Some used RVs with no bump-outs but in good condition can be had for $20-30K. At that price you don't get luxury, but you do get a unit that'll help you figure out what you really want and need without taking a big 30K or larger depreciation hit on a new unit.

--P
__________________

__________________
peterh is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New Smaller tow vehicle choices?? Shelley Towing, Hitching, Axles and Running Gear 69 05-19-2007 06:15 AM
porta-potty choices johnsoba Plumbing | Systems and Fixtures 16 05-18-2006 10:24 AM
Tips for NEWBIES Legacy Posts General Chat 22 05-27-2003 11:13 AM
a/c choices Legacy Posts Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 1 02-20-2003 11:29 PM
Newbies Saying "Hello!" General Chat 0 12-31-1969 07:00 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:07 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.