Thoughts on Leaving Propane On for Furnace at Night? - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 08-11-2015, 09:45 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
Bob in Mb's Avatar
 
Name: Robert
Trailer: Surf-Side
Manitoba
Posts: 261
The newer propane regulators have a safety valve intended to shut down the gas flow if a leak is sensed . However , as I experienced recently , if you have a full tank and you crank the valve wide open the regulator will sense a leak and shut down the flow to almost nothing , and everything has to be shut down and the tank disconnected to allow the regulator to reset . This will also happen if an appliance is left on and the tank valve closed , the next time you use it the regulator will shut down and need to be reset .
Just for interest , welders are taught to only turn on the valve far enough to get a gas flow and if there is an emergency the tank can be closed quickly.
__________________

__________________
Bob in Mb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 09:46 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
Name: RB
Trailer: 1992 Casita Spirit Deluxe
Virginia
Posts: 119
I've also used a little electric 'brick heater' when hooked up to shore power to keep the chill off overnight. If nothing else, the furnace is loud, and a little whirring electric heater is much better to sleep with. Find the smallest one with coils or ceramic heating element that you can. I had a cheapie 1000 Watt unit I used for years when I was van camping.

Our year range Casita actually comes with the furnace thermostat mounted on the side of the cooktop/sink cabinet facing the larger bed. You just reach out and flip the switch and on comes the furnace. Nice for warming up on a cold morning.
__________________

__________________
steelypip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 09:51 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
Name: Darwin
Trailer: 2002 19 ft Scamp 19 ft 5th Wheel
Posts: 3,029
Send a message via Yahoo to Darwin Maring
Propane gas and Carbon Monixide detectors are a must when using Propane in a camper.
__________________
Darwin Maring is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 10:02 AM   #18
Member
 
global2edg's Avatar
 
Name: Eileen
Trailer: 2015 Casita SD 17
Florida
Posts: 87
Propane on the whole time we are hooked up to shore power. We use DC for the fridge when underway - but not all tow vehicles can handle that. Just remember propane should be OFF at gas stations and going through tunnels.
__________________
global2edg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 10:03 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
Bob Miller's Avatar
 
Name: Bob
Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact II
California
Posts: 7,912
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob in Mb View Post
The newer propane regulators have a safety valve intended to shut down the gas flow if a leak is sensed . However , as I experienced recently , if you have a full tank and you crank the valve wide open the regulator will sense a leak and shut down the flow to almost nothing , and everything has to be shut down and the tank disconnected to allow the regulator to reset . This will also happen if an appliance is left on and the tank valve closed , the next time you use it the regulator will shut down and need to be reset .
Just for interest , welders are taught to only turn on the valve far enough to get a gas flow and if there is an emergency the tank can be closed quickly.
I have installed several new LP regulators in the past 6 months and have never came across the problem you mention.

I hope you are not suggesting that LP tanks not be opened fully.
From my personal experience and from many, many posts on RV'ing sites, most LP tank leak occur at the stem seal and opening these valves fully prevents that from happening.

A welder is usually stationed a few feet from a tank, not so with RV'ers. And again, stem leaks are a known issue with consumer LP tanks, both on RV's and on home BBQ's etc.
__________________
Bob Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 10:18 AM   #20
Senior Member
 
Name: Kathy
Trailer: 2017 Escape 19
Washington
Posts: 594
Registry
Went back and read Wendy Lee's original post and a couple of things come to mind for me to add. Wendy, another reason to not mess with turning your propane on and off once you've set up camp is that if you leave it on then you always have your stove ready to go. Who wants to go out first thing in the morning in the rain, for instance, to turn on the propane just to heat up some water for coffee or tea? And if you keep your propane on you will also always have hot water available. You didn't mention it in your OP, but if you're camped with electrical hook-ups, just use a small electric heater like others have suggested. That saves propane. Also, as others have mentioned, running the furnace a lot can run your battery down, but that's only a problem if you're boondocking with no hook-ups to recharge your battery. We set the thermostat on the lowest setting and sleep well knowing the furnace will kick on if the temps drop really low. And yes, get your propane lines pressure tested about once a year.
__________________
Evergreengirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 10:26 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
Bob Miller's Avatar
 
Name: Bob
Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact II
California
Posts: 7,912
[QUOTE=global2edg;541142]Propane on the whole time we are hooked up to shore power. We use DC for the fridge when underway - but not all tow vehicles can handle that. Just remember propane should be OFF at gas stations and going through tunnels.[/QUOTE]
(ialics added)

I believe that propane Flames must be off when refueling, not necessarily the tank itself. This usually means the refrigerator. The rest, water heater, furnace et., should be off when underway anyhow.

And as far as tunnels, only in those few that are marked/signed to turn off propane tanks. Same for ferries and a few other locations.
__________________
Bob Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 10:31 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
CampyTime's Avatar
 
Name: Wendy Lee
Trailer: Scamp 13' Standard
New York
Posts: 1,061
Registry
Yeah you're right. Stupid me goes out every morning to turn propane in to heat my stovetop percolator. I guess I'm just over safe. Although I have a water heater there's no water hookup here so pointless. Plus I have a camco hybrid heat installed so I can use electric for the water heater when water is available.

I called wendts propane just now and will make appt to get all checked when I return home. They're around the corner from me.

Forgot to mention I also have one of those gaslow full/low propane detectors on the tank outside. Is that a sort of leak detector too?

I'm kinda old school. I guess I was always going by BBQ grills. When you're done cooking you turn off the propane. Makes sense, and I guess I was just applying that knowledge to rv ing.


Sent from my iPhone using Fiberglass RV
__________________
CampyTime is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 10:33 AM   #23
Member
 
global2edg's Avatar
 
Name: Eileen
Trailer: 2015 Casita SD 17
Florida
Posts: 87
[QUOTE=Bob Miller;541151]
Quote:
Originally Posted by global2edg View Post
Propane on the whole time we are hooked up to shore power. We use DC for the fridge when underway - but not all tow vehicles can handle that. Just remember propane should be OFF at gas stations and going through tunnels.[/QUOTE]
(ialics added)

I believe that propane Flames must be off when refueling, not necessarily the tank itself. This usually means the refrigerator. The rest, water heater, furnace et., should be off when underway anyhow.

And as far as tunnels, only in those few that are marked/signed to turn off propane tanks. Same for ferries and a few other locations.
Because we have luxury of using DC underway, we have found turning tanks off addresses any restrictions or safety concerns we may come across while traveling. Like the OP, I have a great respect for propane and usually am over cautious.

Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
__________________
global2edg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 11:43 AM   #24
Senior Member
 
Name: Charles
Trailer: Scamp 16
Ohio
Posts: 262
leaks

I camp a lot so I check for leaks a lot. I us a spray bottle of gas leak detector (big blue) that is basically the same as soap and water. 50/50 mix of dish liquid and water will do the same in a spray bottle. I check for leaks a few times a summer and winter, however, your nose does a great job as well hehe. A lot of homes are heated with propane and it is basically the same setup. I have a wireless remote that I bought on Amazon that I use to warm up a little before I get up, not because I'm afraid of leaks , but to conserve battery and LP. It has worked very well for a few years now.
__________________
cmartin748 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 12:31 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
The Minimalist's Avatar
 
Name: Clif
Trailer: 08 Weiscraft Little Joe 14 Subaru Outback 2.5i CVT
Louisiana
Posts: 724
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by steelypip View Post

The difference, of course, is that houses don't bounce around on roads. A periodic rechecks of everything is prudent, but if you have done so, it's fine, and is meant to be left on when in use.
A small spray bottle of soapy water is part of my regular kit. I check all the connections whenever I refill my propane, and any time I have had to open any of the connections.

I also have hardwired an LPG/CO detector in the trailer.
__________________
Clif
The Minimalist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 12:59 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
Bob in Mb's Avatar
 
Name: Robert
Trailer: Surf-Side
Manitoba
Posts: 261
If you doubt my experience - Google - Propane Regulator Problems.
__________________
Bob in Mb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 01:11 PM   #27
Senior Member
 
Bob Miller's Avatar
 
Name: Bob
Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact II
California
Posts: 7,912
Can you provide a link. I can't find any creditable source that suggests not turning the valve all the way ON.
__________________
Bob Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 01:21 PM   #28
Senior Member
 
The Minimalist's Avatar
 
Name: Clif
Trailer: 08 Weiscraft Little Joe 14 Subaru Outback 2.5i CVT
Louisiana
Posts: 724
Registry
Crack open the valve slowly before you open it fully so that the regulator doesn't mistake it for a leak and shut down.

I have had this happen to me. I had to close the valve, loosen the regulator to tank connection to release pressure, reconnect and once again open slo-o-w-w-ly, all the way to prevent stem leaks, as Bob said.
__________________

__________________
Clif
The Minimalist is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
furnace, propane, vin


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Leaving a propane radiant heater on all night Greg Yother Care and Feeding of Molded Fiberglass Trailers 39 03-12-2009 10:42 AM
Leaving Tomorrow for 2 Weeks Legacy Posts General Chat 6 06-18-2003 01:05 PM
Leaving a propane radiant heater on all night Greg Yother General Chat 0 12-31-1969 07:00 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.