Thoughts on Leaving Propane On for Furnace at Night? - Page 3 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 08-11-2015, 01:34 PM   #29
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I can under stand that, to open slowly because the diaphragm will vent a tiny amount as it seats. And that is also what will happen if there is a leak or an appliance left ON. But not opening it all the way is still on my no-no list. I've personally seen a number of stem leaks and have a mini tank of my own I have to recycle because of a stem leak for which a kit is no longer available.
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Old 08-11-2015, 05:51 PM   #30
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Wendy Lee, you said above that "Although I have a water heater there's no water hookup here so pointless." If you have a hot water heater I'm assuming you have a fresh water tank. Is that right? If you have a fresh water tank and water in your water heater, you can go ahead and light it and have hot water. Maybe I don't understand your set-up?
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Old 08-11-2015, 10:37 PM   #31
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"Yeah you're right. Stupid me goes out every morning to turn propane in to heat my stovetop percolator. I guess I'm just over safe. Although I have a water heater there's no water hookup here so pointless. Plus I have a camco hybrid heat installed so I can use electric for the water heater when water is available."

I never sleep with the tank valve open. And I still have a gas monitor in camper. We all have our threshold for safety and there isn't anyone on the planet that would change my mind on this. I've seen the "holes in the Swiss cheese all line up" in industry in ways that are mind blowing and couldn't sleep at night with the propane valve open. That's just me. If you feel safe with gas appliances running in a super small area then by all means. I invest in down sleeping bags and sleep like a baby knowing that 3 failures need to line up for there to be a problem.


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Old 08-11-2015, 11:38 PM   #32
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I don't turn the propane off in my trailer, nor do I dash outside and turn off the gas supply at home when I'm not using it. Same principle, no?
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Old 08-12-2015, 01:33 AM   #33
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I leave mine on also. But maybe for safety I should turn off the valve to the 250 gal LP tank in the backyard. Leave a note for my wife to turn it back on so the stove will work for breakfast. Yes, it can be a safety issue, definitely mine .
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Old 08-12-2015, 05:49 AM   #34
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My approach is gas is always on when camping, off for travel. I would be more concerned with leaking if I were turning it on and off daily. I suspect any system will wear sooner with all that cycling.
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Old 08-12-2015, 07:04 AM   #35
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I don't turn the propane off in my trailer, nor do I dash outside and turn off the gas supply at home when I'm not using it. Same principle, no?
Yeah sure. If you live in a 50 sq ft house that you tow down the road at 60 mph then I guess it is the same principle. Otherwise I would say it's not.
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Old 08-12-2015, 07:19 AM   #36
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The soapy water thing. I e done that to check BBQ at home. What the heck is the matter with me that I wouldn't bring that setup camping? So just a little squirt bottle and spray the connection going I to the trailer, the propane connection at tank...anything else I'm missing?


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Old 08-12-2015, 07:22 AM   #37
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Also CMartin, can you explain the wireless remote thing? Don't you still have to get up and turn on propane ?


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Old 08-12-2015, 08:46 AM   #38
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It always surprises me how some people have huge safety concerns regarding use of propane in camper trailers but don't give a second thought to filling their fuel tanks on their vehicles with a highly explosive liquid and driving around in heavy traffic.

I, like other posters on this thread, am not overly worried about use of propane in my camper. I turn the tanks on at the start of a trip and turn them off when I arrive home. The propane fueled devices attached to my trailer include the hot water heater, refrigerator, oven/stove, furnace, BBQ, and fire bowl. I keep my refrigerator on propane the entire time we are away, even when driving (exception being if we are at a site with electricity, whereas I then use 120V AC for the fridge). While camping and making good use of all of the above devices, I may go through one 20 lb propane cylinder per week.
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Old 08-12-2015, 09:34 AM   #39
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Quote: "I keep my refrigerator on propane the entire time we are away, even when driving"


I hope that you turn it off when refueling...
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Old 08-16-2015, 04:35 PM   #40
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Since I bought a used 2005 Scamp 13, I had gas lines replaced, installed new thermostat (yes, I keep gas on during cold nights) and gas/co monitors, and had all gas burners cleaned and a thorough inspection by local RV repair co.....now, if I could just back up straight!
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Old 08-16-2015, 04:43 PM   #41
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now, if I could just back up straight!
I feel your pain! I do so much better on challenging doglegs with hazards.

Last year after a few tries in a darn open field, a neighbor offered to back my trailer for me. (I declined). If my rellie hadn't been laughing so hard, there'd be videos!

-- Anne
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Old 08-16-2015, 05:23 PM   #42
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If you are really bothered by this, you could install a marine type solenoid shut off.

Trident Marine LPG Propane Gas Control System

This will shut off the propane remotely (near the tank, outside) by a 12 volt solenoid. It is powered when open so is not as useful for RVs with fridges and furnaces on propane. We had something like this on our sailboat for the propane range. With this system, your propane is off, except when the solenoid is energized. These units can also come with a sniffer that will shut off automatically, when gas is detected. One important thing to remember, natural gas is lighter than air and will usually dissipate into the atmosphere. Propane is heavier than air and can "puddle" in nooks and crannies and is, therefore, a more hazardous fuel.
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