Thoughts on Leaving Propane On for Furnace at Night? - Page 4 - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-01-2015, 11:11 PM   #43
Senior Member
 
Johnny M's Avatar
 
Name: John
Trailer: '71 Boler, '87 Play-Mor II
Deep South
Posts: 1,146
As a safety conscious husband, father and retired firefighter of 25+ years here is something to think about for all of you who travel with the propane on. It is estimated that there are over 16 million auto accidents each year. If you are ever in a serious collision while pulling your trailer with the propane on and a line is severed in the collision it could be catastrophic particularly if any occupants in the vehicle become entrapped. Propane is heavier than air meaning it will stay low to the ground, i.e. under a hot running vehicle and it only takes a spark to end tragically. Just something to consider as it only takes seconds to turn that valve on when you get to the campground and a few second more to turn off when you hit the road...stay safe out there & happy camping.
__________________

__________________
Johnny M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2015, 11:20 PM   #44
Senior Member
 
Glenn Baglo's Avatar
 
Name: Glenn ( second 'n' is silent )
Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B '08 RAV4 SPORT V6
British Columbia
Posts: 4,365
My understanding is that the propane bottles sold today have a safety valve in them. Should a hose be severed, the valve detects a rush of propane and shuts down the flow.
That, and that the propane bottles are not in a contained area, mitigates the potential danger.
That said, I can't think of a worse way to die.
__________________

__________________
What happens to the hole when the cheese is gone?
- Bertolt Brecht
Glenn Baglo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2015, 11:42 PM   #45
Senior Member
 
Johnny M's Avatar
 
Name: John
Trailer: '71 Boler, '87 Play-Mor II
Deep South
Posts: 1,146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenn Baglo View Post
My understanding is that the propane bottles sold today have a safety valve in them. Should a hose be severed, the valve detects a rush of propane and shuts down the flow.
That, and that the propane bottles are not in a contained area, mitigates the potential danger.
That said, I can't think of a worse way to die.
Not necessarily so. In a collision serious enough to sever a propane hose, any propane safety device whether a safety valve or other hardware could be compromised as well and it could fail. I choose not to take that gamble with my family, you may choose different.

As first responders/firefighters the first thing checked for on a collision scene was leaking fuel of any kind (propane, gasoline, diesel, natural gas) regardless of the tank or source. We can't help any victims if we become one as well.
__________________
Johnny M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2015, 12:06 AM   #46
Senior Member
 
Glenn Baglo's Avatar
 
Name: Glenn ( second 'n' is silent )
Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B '08 RAV4 SPORT V6
British Columbia
Posts: 4,365
I suspect the most dangerous source of fuel in the event of an accident is the gas tank in the vehicle. The trailer has likely separated and is about a hundred feet away.
I spent 45 years as a news photographer, and I learned to look up to make sure a live power line wasn't about to drop on me. Learned to look for an escape route. Learned that a life can end in an instant, so I have three smoke alarms and a CO alarm, and four fire extinguishers in my 800 square foot house.
For all that, I will run with propane on so my fridge stays cold.
I would advise that pedestrians stop reading text messages on their phone and listening to music with ear-buds while crossing the street. That body under the bus stayed with me for weeks after covering that accident.
__________________
What happens to the hole when the cheese is gone?
- Bertolt Brecht
Glenn Baglo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2015, 07:45 AM   #47
Member
 
Name: David
Trailer: 1973 Boler 1300
British Columbia
Posts: 32
Propane powered vehicles

There are thousands of propane powered cars and trucks out there, especially in Alberta and Saskatchewan; I used to own one. Insofar as I know, the only stipulation is that they are not allowed in underground parkades, for obvious reasons. Interestingly, while BC Ferries insists that the propane is shut off in trailers and RVs, they do not have the same requirement for propane powered vehicles, some of which are dual fuel, some of which are propane only. I have owned or driven both types and the dual fuel is way more convenient. I am also a firefighter (albeit volunteer) and I am of the opinion that gasoline is the way bigger hazard, considering the fragile tanks it is stored in. But we tend to not think of it because we are all used to handling it so much. If the propane line is damaged, unless it was before the regulator, I doubt that a leak could ever pool enough propane to pose a hazard. Just my opinion, YMMV.
__________________
greenghost45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2015, 09:52 AM   #48
Senior Member
 
Bob Miller's Avatar
 
Name: Bob
Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact II
California
Posts: 7,912
After having just spent a month in the Washington fire areas, I have the greatest respect for our first responders. However, I just don't think that the danger cited in Post #43 is supported by statistics.


Yes, there is an increased risk when leaving the propane ON while under way, but it is statistically so slight that it doesn't emerge from the fog of the other risks that we routinely take while driving.


In umpteen years, and maybe 100,000 miles of RV'ing, I know of exactly two instances where LP gas ignited as the result of an accident and, in both case, the accidents were caused by negligent owners having what I call "Self Inflicted" accidents.


In one case, a 12 year old tire on a motorhome blew apart and damaged an LP line, leading to a fire, in the other example, an axle end failed, sending dual tires into the coachwork and severing an LP line, again leading to a fire. In the latter case the owner of the Toyota based motorhome had intentionally ignored a recall concerning the very same issue with axle failures.


While I have personally seen many accidents involving wrecked, and even overturned trailers and motorhomes, and have read and seen pics of dozens more, I have yet to see one that caught fire. And with the addition of the safety flow valve, the chances of this happening are further reduced.


Now, Police see lots of auto accidents and bad guys, Doctors see lots of sick and injured people, and Fire Fighters see lots of fires and accidents, which could lead one to be jaded, but I don't see any real reports or statistics that support the concern.


I am more concerned about the guy on a cellphone, the kids without safety restraints, and the teen drivers that account for a disproportionate number of accidents, than the very remote chance that wanting to keep my refrigerator running while towing will expose me to even a modicum of risk.


But to all first responders, Thank You for all of your service and the risks you take to protect us and our families.
__________________
Bob Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2015, 08:15 AM   #49
Member
 
boats19's Avatar
 
Name: Gary
Trailer: 1976 13' Scamp
Michigan
Posts: 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Miller View Post
Can you provide a link. I can't find any creditable source that suggests not turning the valve all the way ON.
I've always been told 1/4 turn only when turning on the valve. Since reading this thread I did a quick Google search looking for an answer to the question of propane valve safety. I found nothing about turning the valve on. It seems if it was a safety issue nearly all sites would mention it boldly. I understand the "full open seat" in valves, and the 1/4 turn for quick close idea, but are both just opinions? Is it possible that the new valves are different in some way than the old ones? I honestly don't know.
__________________
boats19 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2015, 05:08 AM   #50
CPW
Senior Member
 
CPW's Avatar
 
Name: Carl
Trailer: 2015 Escape 5.0TA
Flori-duh!
Posts: 934
Registry
I believe the idea of not fully opening the propane on resulted from some welder's who only open the valves on acetylene tanks for safety reasons. The practice was never intended to be applied to propane and has become one of those myths that just won't die, like don't store a battery on a concrete surface. At one time, when battery cases were rubber, that was true, but with today's plastic cased batteries, it is a carry-over which no longer applies. The OPD valves on propane tanks should be opened slowly, but fully in order to properly flow the propane. And think about this: Would being able to close the valve slightly faster make a difference if a problem were to occur and you were not right next to the tank with your hand on the valve at the ready?


Sent from my iPhone using Fiberglass RV
__________________
CPW is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2015, 11:45 AM   #51
Member
 
boats19's Avatar
 
Name: Gary
Trailer: 1976 13' Scamp
Michigan
Posts: 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by CPW View Post
And think about this: Would being able to close the valve slightly faster make a difference if a problem were to occur and you were not right next to the tank with your hand on the valve at the ready?


Sent from my iPhone using Fiberglass RV
With the arthritis in my hands I would say, yes!

As to the myth idea that's kind of what I was wondering. I still haven't found anything on Google about proper LP valve use...
__________________
boats19 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2015, 11:58 AM   #52
Senior Member
 
Briantb's Avatar
 
Name: Brian
Trailer: 2015 Scamp 13 Front Washroom, Little Guy Teardrop
Ontario
Posts: 372
Even though you have your furnace on, you no doubt have the window at your head open a bit to let in fresh air to combat condensation... Right

Sent from my MotoG3 using Fiberglass RV mobile app
__________________
Briantb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2015, 12:00 PM   #53
Senior Member
 
floyd's Avatar
 
Name: Floyd
Trailer: 2004 13 ft Scamp Custom Deluxe
IllAnnoy
Posts: 6,043
Registry
BUT...but... what about a propane powered Tow vehicle?
__________________
floyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2015, 12:20 PM   #54
Senior Member
 
Bob Miller's Avatar
 
Name: Bob
Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact II
California
Posts: 7,912
I am communicating with a major LP tank manufacturer and, apparently, it's not a simple question about how much the valve should be opened.
I expect to hear from their R&D department today.
__________________
Bob Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2015, 03:55 PM   #55
Senior Member
 
Jon Vermilye's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2017 Escape 21
Oswego, NY
Posts: 1,406
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Miller View Post
I am communicating with a major LP tank manufacturer and, apparently, it's not a simple question about how much the valve should be opened.
I expect to hear from their R&D department today.
Part of the problem may be with tank size. The large, multi hundred gallon tanks used for homes often have a double seating valve, however I have not seen any specification for one on the smaller portable tanks.

Unless the valve is double seating, there is no advantage to opening it all the way. As to welding, with an gas welding system, the acetylene tank is relatively low pressure, does not use a double seating valve, and should be opened less than a turn. The oxygen tank starts out at around 3000psi, and because of the high pressure, uses a double seating valve to prevent oxygen leakage around the valve stem. That is the reason for fully opening it.

Again, I doubt a double seating valve is used on a 20 or 30 pound propane tank, so fully opening it is not going to prevent leakage around the stem.

I'm interested in hearing what the tank R&D people say, however be sure they are talking about small portable tanks.
Jon Vermilye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2015, 11:33 AM   #56
Member
 
boats19's Avatar
 
Name: Gary
Trailer: 1976 13' Scamp
Michigan
Posts: 98
So Carl, the valve myth may be about the seal...
Bob, have you heard back from the LP tank manufacturer?
__________________

__________________
boats19 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
furnace, propane, vin


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Leaving a propane radiant heater on all night Greg Yother Care and Feeding of Molded Fiberglass Trailers 39 03-12-2009 10:42 AM
Leaving Tomorrow for 2 Weeks Legacy Posts General Chat 6 06-18-2003 01:05 PM
Leaving a propane radiant heater on all night Greg Yother General Chat 0 12-31-1969 07:00 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:48 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.