Tire Pressure - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 04-21-2006, 11:17 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Trailer: Scamp 13 ft
Posts: 7
Do any of you change your tow vehicle tire pressure when towing vs not towing? I was considering setting the rear tires a few pounds higher than the door sticker and leaving them that way. We had a popup for a number of years, and I never did anything special with that and never had any problems - so maybe this is a non-issue.

Thanks,
Ron

New Scamp 13 in Maine
__________________

__________________
Ron and Alma is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2006, 12:14 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Chris Z's Avatar
 
Trailer: 16 Scamp, 17 Casita, 21Bigfoot now
Posts: 412
Registry
Ron
For years and years I haven't paid any attention to the door sticker on my vehicles whether I am pulling something or not. I run the tires near the max psi stated on the tire. May give a slightly harsher ride but the tires last longer and the gas mileage is better.
__________________

__________________
Chris Z is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2006, 12:30 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Brian B-P's Avatar
 
Name: Brian
Trailer: Boler (B1700RGH) 1979
Alberta
Posts: 5,000
After many years as a car enthusiast with some competition experience, I do not advocate inflating tires to the rated maximum unless the load conditions call for this, because overinflation can hurt traction, make the ride harsher, and cause uneven tire wear (excessive centre wear). On the other hand, the tire pressures recommended by the vehicle manufacturer (the door sticker numbers) may be too low for optimal handling or wear, since they consider ride comfort. I consider the pressure given on the vehicle sticker a minimum, the one in the sidewall marking a maximum, and inflate to suit conditions.

The most suitable pressure depends on the tire type and size, and the load. With very wide tires on light cars, the appropriate pressure is low; with moderately sized tires on heavily loaded vehicles such as trailers, the most appropriate pressure might be quite high. The passenger-type tires on my Boler (P205/75R14) are being used very near their load limit (1350 lb after 10% derating), and thus require inflation pressure right at their rating (35 PSI); if they were rated for higher pressure, I would use it, and would expect better control, less wear, and less rolling drag. New tires are planned for this year...

In practice, I drive hard enough that I keep front tire pressures in my cars near the maximum. When I was participating in autoslalom competition, I exceeded the front tire rated limit, to keep the tires from rolling over onto their sidewalls. This is not a normal driving scenario, especially while towing.

On the Sienna, I generally run the Toyota recommended pressures, except to inflate the rears to the rated maximum for towing. The additional lateral stiffness of the higher pressure is good for control. While the sticker pressure will ensure adequate load capacity (assuming that the axle limit is observed) a little more load capacity margin seems like a good idea when loading the rear axle to near its limit. Having said this, I don't have enough towing time to judge whether my chosen pressures have proven to be suitable.
__________________
1979 Boler B1700RGH, pulled by 2004 Toyota Sienna LE 2WD
Information is good. Lack of information is not so good, but misinformation is much worse. Check facts, and apply common sense liberally.
STATUS: No longer active in forum.
Brian B-P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2006, 02:05 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Roger H's Avatar
 
Name: Roger
Trailer: Y2K6 Born Free 32RQ on the Kodiak chassis, 1995 Coachmen 19' B-van and 1996 Precision 21' Sailboat
Iowa
Posts: 5,000
My suggestion is to inflate your tire for the anticipated load. Each tire has a max load rating on the side at a max inflation pressure. If you roughly figure out what the load on each tire will be, you can check the websites of most manufacturers (this is especially true of light truck tires) and they will tell you what the load rating is for a specific tire at a specific inflation.

When driving around unladen, I carry about 35psi in the "D" range tires on my Tundra for the nice ride and even wear. When towing, I inflate the rears to 55 psi (60 psi max, per the tire) and 45 psi for the fronts.

I run my trailer tires at max psi just because they run cooler that way. The odds are that the sidewalls will deteriorate from ozone exposure long before you'll wear the tread out in the middle on your trailer tires.

Roger
__________________
Roger H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2006, 12:11 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Pete Dumbleton's Avatar
 
Trailer: Scamp
Posts: 3,072
Send a message via Yahoo to Pete Dumbleton
Don't forget to use some common sense -- I drove about 12,000 miles one sumer around BC, YT and AK on some pretty nasty roads (I didn't go up to Arctic Circle nor all the way to Yellowknife, but I hit all the others on the Milepost map) -- Expecting trouble, I carried a spare tire/wheel for the Scamp and a spare tire/wheel plus an extra tire for the truck -- In all those miles, I had ZERO flats -- I credit this to keeping both my speed and tire pressures a bit lower than max.

Came in handy when I got the rig stuck in roadside mud, also

Don't forget to restore the pressures to normal back on the paved roads with greater speeds (If you are riding around in the boondocks on roads with rocks, you should be carrying patching and inflation equipment, of course).

Take two balloons, inflate one way up and just barely inflate the other -- Try jabbing them both slowly with your finger and then quickly with your finger (you may need more than two balloons) -- See which ones pop first and which ones you can't hardly manage to pop.

We've all learned at our father's knee to keep those tires pumped up, but the caveat is that advice pertains to high speeds on good roads -- Go to one of those West Coast park areas where they run 4x4s, etc across the sand and you'll see them pull in, let a lot of air out of the SUV/truck tires and THEN take off into the sand.

There are times when pressures should be high and times when they should be low -- Use the stuf behind your eyes to decide which is best for the conditions.
__________________
Pete Dumbleton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2006, 08:11 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
John & Sandy M's Avatar
 
Trailer: 1999 Scamp 16 ft
Posts: 130
Quote:
Do any of you change your tow vehicle tire pressure when towing vs not towing? I was considering setting the rear tires a few pounds higher than the door sticker and leaving them that way. We had a popup for a number of years, and I never did anything special with that and never had any problems - so maybe this is a non-issue.

Thanks,
Ron

New Scamp 13 in Maine
The Scamp manual recommends full inflation pressure when towing and to reduce pressure 10 psi (or so) when storing for any length of time. I know from towing my boat that an underinflated tire will get extremely hot when towing at highway speeds due to the constant flexing of the sidewall. The mileage on the underinflated tire will be less too.
__________________
John & Sandy M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2006, 08:15 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Roger H's Avatar
 
Name: Roger
Trailer: Y2K6 Born Free 32RQ on the Kodiak chassis, 1995 Coachmen 19' B-van and 1996 Precision 21' Sailboat
Iowa
Posts: 5,000
Quote:
Don't forget to use some common sense --

We've all learned at our father's knee to keep those tires pumped up, but the caveat is that advice pertains to high speeds on good roads -- Go to one of those West Coast park areas where they run 4x4s, etc across the sand and you'll see them pull in, let a lot of air out of the SUV/truck tires and THEN take off into the sand.

There are times when pressures should be high and times when they should be low -- Use the stuf behind your eyes to decide which is best for the conditions.
Obviously Pete's right (again... )

Reduced pressure... reduced speeds... Gravel roads don't like hard tires; it's like driving on marbles. But then again... one shouldn't be driving at freeway speeds on gravel either!

Roger
__________________
Roger H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2006, 05:01 PM   #8
Junior Member
 
Trailer: Scamp 13 ft
Posts: 7
I would like to thank everyone for the responses and advice. I expect I will be on tar for most of my towing. Once at my destination, there are many dirt roads to explore in Maine.

Ron
__________________

__________________
Ron and Alma is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tire Pressure Pat C Towing, Hitching, Axles and Running Gear 9 07-01-2010 02:38 PM
13' Scamp tire pressure Jeff Larsen Towing, Hitching, Axles and Running Gear 4 08-02-2009 03:58 PM
Need Help with the Right Tire Pressure for a New-to-Me Burro DENNIS GOULD Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 4 02-28-2008 03:24 PM
Tire Pressure Pete Dumbleton Care and Feeding of Molded Fiberglass Trailers 6 07-13-2007 06:37 PM
Gas mileage vs. tire pressure General Chat 0 12-31-1969 07:00 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.