Trillium 1300 Water Leaks - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 06-27-2018, 11:13 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Name: MELISSA
Trailer: Trillium
ID
Posts: 17
Trillium 1300 Water Leaks

We have been having some serious leaks in our 13 foot 1976 Trillium for a year. I thought it was the windows, so I had them all resealed (more about that in a minute), but we still have leaks. Yesterday went through with a friend and hose tested. Think we found the issue. The back left window corner is letting in a little water. The aluminum was bent, but had the RV guy bend it back into place. Still needs a bit of a seal. Thinking vinyl J seal might help as it looks to hav shrunk over the years. Also thinking about adding in a strip of weather seal to the lower part of the jalouse window. Also noticed after getting it back from RV guy that the back window wood is totally rotted. Could he have even resealed the window without noticing this? All the screws are therefore loose because they don't have anything to grab onto. Planning on having my carpenter husband build a new window frame. Also noticed the roof vent has a hole where I can see daylight. The old J seal? has crumbled. Do I just need to replace that seal or other suggestions. Will try to add in pics below. Thanks for any advice. (BTW, the belly band seems to be in good shape...no leaks there) The back window is the only one rotted.
__________________

Mel P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2018, 11:18 AM   #2
Junior Member
 
Name: MELISSA
Trailer: Trillium
ID
Posts: 17
Here are pics of the back window.
Attached Thumbnails
fullsizeoutput_2aa2.jpg   IMG_4485.jpg  

IMG_4474.jpg   IMG_4475.jpg  

__________________

Mel P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2018, 11:21 AM   #3
Junior Member
 
Name: MELISSA
Trailer: Trillium
ID
Posts: 17
pics of the roof vent

the pic where you can see the light: it is the back corner that is leaking light. I couldn't close it all the way with the screen pulled down.
Attached Thumbnails
IMG_4483.jpg   IMG_4472.jpg  

IMG_4484.jpg  
Mel P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2018, 01:01 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
David Tilston's Avatar
 
Name: Dave W
Trailer: Trillium 4500 - 1977, 1978 (2), 1300 - 1977, 1973, and a 1972
Alberta
Posts: 5,849
Registry
The only solution to the rotted wood is to pull the window out completely. Then replace the wood. I suggest that you use 3/4" marine plywood.

I did some drawings of the required plywood pieces in this thread:
Trillium window wood, dry out or replace

And the process is documented in this thread:
My first Trillium window thread.

I notice that the person that did your windows replaced the #8 Robertson screws with hex head screws. The plastic screw covers may not fit over those. Being a Canadian patriot, I am a fan of Robertson screws.

They also left quite a mess of sealant around your windows.
David Tilston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2018, 01:11 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
John in Michigan's Avatar
 
Name: John
Trailer: 1978 Trillium 4500, 1979 Boler 1700
Michigan
Posts: 1,305
Registry
Wow! Yep we are also in the process of totally removing, cleaning, re-sealing with butyl tape and re-installing the rear window on our Trillium 4500 AND ALSO doing the permanent seal of the belly band.

Good chance that your shop did not totally remove, clean, re-seal with butyl tape and re-install the rear window on your Trillium. They probably just applied sealant without removing and re-installing.

We are also replacing all of the seals, and we figured out that its a good idea to AT LEAST replace all of the y seals and the header seal while the window is out. Also replace the torque operators if they are worn out.

I will say that with all of the hose tests and "field tests" that we did with our Trillium 4500 with all of its Hehr jalousie windows, the vinyl trim pieces aren't really critical to keeping water out during downpours, heavy, light, all day, etc. This is because the style of Hehr jalousie windows used in the Trilliums have a wide, sloped down header and sill. Most of the water that gets behind the panes runs right back out.

Also, I would agree with you that your wood frame needs to be replaced so that the screws hold the window in place.

-John
__________________
Trillium 4500 Journal
http://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/f...nal-81345.html
John in Michigan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2018, 01:18 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
John in Michigan's Avatar
 
Name: John
Trailer: 1978 Trillium 4500, 1979 Boler 1700
Michigan
Posts: 1,305
Registry
To add to what I said in the previous post, we have found in the Trillium style jalousie windows, the rain water seeps in between the window flange and the fiberglass body.

EDIT: Might also want to check the center band for leaks.
__________________
Trillium 4500 Journal
http://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/f...nal-81345.html
John in Michigan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2018, 01:23 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
John in Michigan's Avatar
 
Name: John
Trailer: 1978 Trillium 4500, 1979 Boler 1700
Michigan
Posts: 1,305
Registry
Concerning the roof vent, it does appear you could just replace the seal if you can find one that fits.
__________________
Trillium 4500 Journal
http://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/f...nal-81345.html
John in Michigan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2018, 01:25 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
John in Michigan's Avatar
 
Name: John
Trailer: 1978 Trillium 4500, 1979 Boler 1700
Michigan
Posts: 1,305
Registry
Definitely use a thick layer of butyl tape, not caulk, when re-sealing behind the window flange.

EDIT: Also, use stainless steel fasteners.
__________________
Trillium 4500 Journal
http://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/f...nal-81345.html
John in Michigan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2018, 09:11 AM   #9
Junior Member
 
Name: MELISSA
Trailer: Trillium
ID
Posts: 17
Thank you David

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Tilston View Post
The only solution to the rotted wood is to pull the window out completely. Then replace the wood. I suggest that you use 3/4" marine plywood.

I did some drawings of the required plywood pieces in this thread:
Trillium window wood, dry out or replace

And the process is documented in this thread:
My first Trillium window thread.

I notice that the person that did your windows replaced the #8 Robertson screws with hex head screws. The plastic screw covers may not fit over those. Being a Canadian patriot, I am a fan of Robertson screws.

They also left quite a mess of sealant around your windows.
Thanks David for the links. There are so many threads on here and I have missed those. Appreciate it. The mess of sealant and hex screws were a former owner. The windows were never pretty. I think the guy I just had work on them put a bead of clear caulk and called it a reseal. I received some bad recommendations apparently. I have a friend who has done a few cab over camper remodels who has offered to help us remove the window and replace.
Mel P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2018, 09:13 AM   #10
Junior Member
 
Name: MELISSA
Trailer: Trillium
ID
Posts: 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by John in Michigan View Post
To add to what I said in the previous post, we have found in the Trillium style jalousie windows, the rain water seeps in between the window flange and the fiberglass body.

EDIT: Might also want to check the center band for leaks.
Thanks John for your insights. We did check the belly band and it appears to be in good shape. Just those dang jalousie windows! they look great, but what a hassle. Part of me is tempted at some point in the future to replace with more modern sliders. Won't be true to the original, but wouldn't leak like sieves either!

Thanks for your link. I look forward to checking it all out.
Mel P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2018, 09:15 AM   #11
Junior Member
 
Name: Rob
Trailer: Bigfoot
Alberta
Posts: 13
Registry
The roof hatch is made of aluminum and from use has bowed the center down creating the side gaps. Simple reach up and gently bend the ends down to close the gap. Test and bend again if needed.
RB Arthur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2018, 09:19 AM   #12
Junior Member
 
Name: MELISSA
Trailer: Trillium
ID
Posts: 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by RB Arthur View Post
The roof hatch is made of aluminum and from use has bowed the center down creating the side gaps. Simple reach up and gently bend the ends down to close the gap. Test and bend again if needed.
Thanks Rob. Will try that out.
Mel P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2018, 09:40 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
John in Michigan's Avatar
 
Name: John
Trailer: 1978 Trillium 4500, 1979 Boler 1700
Michigan
Posts: 1,305
Registry
In general, your existing Hehr jalousie windows once cleaned, repaired if necessary, and re-sealed will be far better than new sliders. Reasons:

- These old Hehr jalousies are extremely sturdy, and they offer better ventilation than sliders.
- You can leave them open when its raining. When we are vacation-camping with our Trillium, we often leave the windows part way open when we are away sight-seeing and we don't have to worry about downpours.
- Jalousies don't get plugged up with dirt, etc. and don't require weep holes to drain rain water. Generally jalousies drain rain water much better than sliders. Our Hehr jalousies have 2 inch wide slanted sills that direct any rain water that gets behind the panes back out and away from the side of the camper.

If you do decide to replace the windows, you can sell the old windows on ebay for a good price, or offer them on this forum.

-John
__________________
Trillium 4500 Journal
http://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/f...nal-81345.html
John in Michigan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2018, 09:41 AM   #14
Junior Member
 
Name: MELISSA
Trailer: Trillium
ID
Posts: 17
thanks!
Mel P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2019, 03:18 PM   #15
Junior Member
 
Name: MELISSA
Trailer: Trillium
ID
Posts: 17
I am posting some new pics for a trailer repair company to check out. My lovely carpenter husband does not care to help me with the camper so need to pull in some outside help.

Any advice for the trailer repair company with replacing window frame on Trillium fiberglass? Do you just pull out the window, rebuild frame and attach with the screws/hex bolts and seal with?...
Thanks all.
Mel
Attached Thumbnails
IMG_6150.jpg   IMG_6151.jpg  

IMG_6152.jpg   IMG_6153.jpg  

Mel P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2019, 04:12 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
Name: bill
Trailer: 2013 Escape 19; 1977 Trillium 1300
The Mountains of North Carolina
Posts: 2,455
Registry
You probably need a handyman/carpenter and you are going to have to tell him what to do exactly and supervise the entire time. You have a project there and with four to six windows depending on your trailer it’s quite a bit of work.

Projects are really best suited for the do it yourself types. I must have 200 hours so far into my 1977 Trillium project and I am not done. If I paid an RV place at $75 to $100 per hour you can see where that is going.

Sometimes it’s smarter to just sell it as a project and buy something new. It’s like owning an old house. They look cool but are a lot of work.

The average RV shop is going to just put caulk around the windows and call it good. You need someone coachable that takes direction. And in my experience, whenever I have someone doing work I have to be there in person the entire time. Invariably decisions have to be made on the fly and if you are not there, look out.

But first I would read every single Trillium thread on window repair. I just finished the belly band and it was a lot more work than removing, repairing and resealing the windows IME.

I didn’t know how to do the repair work on my Trillium but thanks to the threads on this forum, I got the knowledge I needed. Randy Bishop and David Tilston postings have been very helpful along with many others. Read, read, read! It’s a lot cheaper to read than redo.
__________________
Check my Trillium Project Page: https://www.facebook.com/Bills-1977-...dmin_todo_tour
thrifty bill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2019, 05:15 PM   #17
Junior Member
 
Name: MELISSA
Trailer: Trillium
ID
Posts: 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by thrifty bill View Post
You probably need a handyman/carpenter and you are going to have to tell him what to do exactly and supervise the entire time. You have a project there and with four to six windows depending on your trailer it’s quite a bit of work.

Projects are really best suited for the do it yourself types. I must have 200 hours so far into my 1977 Trillium project and I am not done. If I paid an RV place at $75 to $100 per hour you can see where that is going.

Sometimes it’s smarter to just sell it as a project and buy something new. It’s like owning an old house. They look cool but are a lot of work.

The average RV shop is going to just put caulk around the windows and call it good. You need someone coachable that takes direction. And in my experience, whenever I have someone doing work I have to be there in person the entire time. Invariably decisions have to be made on the fly and if you are not there, look out.

But first I would read every single Trillium thread on window repair. I just finished the belly band and it was a lot more work than removing, repairing and resealing the windows IME.

I didn’t know how to do the repair work on my Trillium but thanks to the threads on this forum, I got the knowledge I needed. Randy Bishop and David Tilston postings have been very helpful along with many others. Read, read, read! It’s a lot cheaper to read than redo.
Thanks Bill for the feedback. Thankfully it is just the one back window that is rotted and needing replaced. The trailer repair company came highly recommended from several friends and I have been told that the repair man loves carpentry projects. Yes, it could get pricey, but not as pricey as selling the camper at a loss and then trying to find another one in better shape. It took me 3 years to find this one as I live in the middle of nowhere and needed the 13 footer for max towing weight with my car. Fingers crossed they are able to pull out the window and do this for under 100 hours. ha ha ha. Dear lord that would be insane. The other thankful is that the belly bad is currently in good shape. Did a major water test last fall. Good luck with your camper. Once I get this fixed up I will be on the lookout for a new one I think...should start now as it might take me 3 more years.
Mel P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2019, 05:45 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Name: bill
Trailer: 2013 Escape 19; 1977 Trillium 1300
The Mountains of North Carolina
Posts: 2,455
Registry
Windows (five in my case) took me less than a week to do. Not bad. Belly band on the other hand....

Found rot on the bottom and side of the front window, rot on one side of the rear window, and no framing at all on the kitchen window. Also no signs of the front rock guard/awning ever having any seal material under it. And since the rock guard is attached to the same piece of wood as the window, that may well have made mine worse.

Given how bad your one window is, I would expect other windows to have problems too.


Here is a picture of some of the window screws. Note how much some screws are rotted away. Screws on the far right are what they all should have looked like.

1977 Trillium Rebuild by wrk101, on Flickr
thrifty bill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2019, 05:59 PM   #19
Junior Member
 
Name: MELISSA
Trailer: Trillium
ID
Posts: 17
Hey John...finally getting around to getting the Trillium fixed this year. Found hopefully a good guy to help out. Do you have any idea what kind of seal I need for the roof vent? Trying to figure out what to order.
Mel P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2019, 06:45 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
John in Michigan's Avatar
 
Name: John
Trailer: 1978 Trillium 4500, 1979 Boler 1700
Michigan
Posts: 1,305
Registry
Melissa, this is what my vent seal looks like. Appears that a previous owner replaced the entire vent assembly and this is the seal that came with it.
Attached Thumbnails
trillium vent seal.jpg  
__________________

__________________
Trillium 4500 Journal
http://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/f...nal-81345.html
John in Michigan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
leaks, trillium


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
'76 Trillium-Not All Leaks From Bellyband georgewa Modifications, Alterations and Updates 9 06-24-2014 11:31 AM
trillium factory A/C roof panel leaks bobby62g Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 1 02-17-2014 10:48 PM
Water leaks on 13' Scamp BucketsGoneWild Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 5 10-11-2011 06:37 PM
Mysterious leaks in Trillium 1300...maybe solved David Swinnard Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 3 06-11-2009 08:40 AM
Problem with leaks on new water heater.... FredericL Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 15 04-22-2009 09:24 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:07 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
×