What is the better surface for storing a fiberglass RV outside? - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 10-06-2016, 10:43 AM   #15
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I saw some time back, so I don't remember the brand, that one of the upscale inflatable plastic garages for vintage cars (kind of a blow-up tent), featured a small fan that you keep running all winter to circulate air under the vehicle.
So I guess keeping a trailer fairly high up off whatever surface, would be advantageous i.e. jack it up and put large/tall (not cinder!) blocks under your favourite spots.
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Old 10-06-2016, 12:20 PM   #16
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When I was visiting friends in Tallahassee, one of their neighbors had a collection of antique Dodge trucks. He made pads from pressure-treated landscape timbers staked into the ground. I would assume they floated on a bed of sand or gravel. Anyway, it seemed like a good solution, they looked great and he had some very expensive machinery sitting on them. May do something similar in our yard if we don't get a poured concrete pad, or one made of pavers.
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Old 10-06-2016, 11:38 PM   #17
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The worst thing for Metal is Grass as it will eat through a metal frame

Quote:
Originally Posted by stude View Post
:Make sure you cut some 3/4" Plywood squares to put under them so they do not sink down into Asphalt.
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:quite quickly, I know a fellow who parked his car on grass and 2 years later came back to start restoring it and the whole interior floor including the trunk and inner fenders were all gone, grass contains water and metal does not like water because over time you get rust.
That car was a family item from way back and he did a complete Restoration on it, he will drive it till he cannot not anymore but he has sons and daughters all waiting in line for it. Anything can be repaird but it costs money! and someone else to do the work.
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Old 10-07-2016, 09:22 AM   #18
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Well, the grass underneath our Casita is dying, so I doubt if it will be a problem; the dirt is fairly hard. I'm trying to decide what to do about winter. I may jack up the wheels an inch or so and put jackstands under the frame to hold them; probably should get some outdoor plywood or paving stones for the stands.

I'd like to keep the snow off, but covers are expensive, and any kind of DIY carport that will survive snow and wind much more so. I'd also like to be able to get inside to do some work, e.g. put in some shelves in the closet.

Suggestions welcome. . .

/Mr Lynn
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Old 10-08-2016, 10:01 AM   #19
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My only place to easily store my trailer in beside my house. Right now I have it parked on the grass, but I know that it is not a good idea.

Should I put a tarp under it? (Knowing it will likely kill the grass)
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Old 10-09-2016, 11:00 PM   #20
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To protect the tires put a piece of wood under them so that the dirt or concrete doesn't cause drying out of the tires. We park on concrete but in our garage and park on wood or rubber backed carpet. For the frame I have no suggestions.
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Old 10-09-2016, 11:14 PM   #21
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Wood contains water. Concrete contains water. When you tow the trailer, you drive on wet asphalt. Relax. Fergetaboutit.
After almost eight years, I finally replaced my Marathons that came with the trailer. Tread was in great condition. No rot.
I replaced them because the interweb says I should, and I don't want a flat. Had no issues at all.
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Old 10-10-2016, 11:58 AM   #22
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Wood contains water. Concrete contains water. When you tow the trailer, you drive on wet asphalt. Relax. Fergetaboutit.
After almost eight years, I finally replaced my Marathons that came with the trailer. Tread was in great condition. No rot.
I replaced them because the interweb says I should, and I don't want a flat. Had no issues at all.
The reason for putting wood or rubber mat under the tires is so the dirt or concrete doesn't suck the moisture out of the tires. The wet is fine.
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Old 10-10-2016, 12:29 PM   #23
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The reason for putting wood or rubber mat under the tires is so the dirt or concrete doesn't suck the moisture out of the tires. The wet is fine.
Sorry. I don't buy that either.
What are you going to do about humidity in the air, or lack thereof?
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Old 10-10-2016, 03:13 PM   #24
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The reason for putting wood or rubber mat under the tires is so the dirt or concrete doesn't suck the moisture out of the tires. The wet is fine.
Don't tell the folks that live in Phoenix......


And how does a rubber mat make any difference to a rubber tire?
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Old 10-10-2016, 03:51 PM   #25
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Here's what tire manufacturers say:

http://www.goodyearrvtires.com/tire-storage.aspx

http://us.coopertire.com/Tire-Safety...ing-Tires.aspx
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Old 10-10-2016, 04:35 PM   #26
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Sorry. I don't buy that either.
What are you going to do about humidity in the air, or lack thereof?
I didn't make this up. I have read and heard about it from tire manufacturers and RV people for years. Dry dirt and unsealed concrete pulls moisture out of tires where they make contact with the ground and continues to dry out rubber. The humidity really has nothing to do with it. It's the chemicals so to speak in the dirt and concrete.
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Old 10-10-2016, 04:49 PM   #27
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Drive through a mall and count how many vehicles are parked with their tires on wood planks.
After more than seven years parked in my driveway on asphalt, my tires still looked new. If they do dry out, it must take decades.
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Old 10-10-2016, 04:58 PM   #28
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According to the links I posted, raising the tires off the ground is the ticket.

I found the pressure recommendations interesting. If you store off the ground, you should reduce the pressure to 10psi, but if they stay on the ground with weight on them, you should increase the pressure by 10 psi (subject to the limits of tire and rim, of course).

There is, of course, the obvious: protection from sunlight and high temperatures (as might occur on black asphalt). Oxygen, apparently, is bad, too, but not much you can do about that unless you remove the wheels and store in a garage or shed. Didn't know there was such a thing as a tire storage bag…

Seems to me how far you go with this depends on how long the trailer will sit. Some people (like me) use the trailer off and on all year long. I really don't want too much of a rigamarole to bug out, and if tire life is reduced somewhat, I accept that. On the other hand, if it was going to sit in storage for 6 months, I might remove the wheels, reduce the pressure, and store them indoors in bags.
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