Which eggs have double wall construction? - Fiberglass RV


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Old 08-02-2007, 08:44 AM   #1
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We are looking at purchasing an egg. One of the things I would like (not a requirement however) is a well insulated camper. It seems a camper with a double wall is the best way to achieve this. I am sure this topic has been well discussed, but I am having trouble sorting through my searches on this topic.

I believe, the bigfoots are the logical choice, but I don't have that kind of cash. Do trilliums, burros, or bolers, have double wall construction? I know the Scamps and Casitas don't. Any others have double wall construction?

I would like to be able to have the thing hold a little heat it in the winter.

Thanks,
Scott
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Old 08-02-2007, 09:11 AM   #2
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Burros and U Hauls have double hulls.

Insulation was an OPTION in the Burros, so you may not run into it with every one you look at.
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Old 08-02-2007, 09:14 AM   #3
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Here is my list of double wall trailers: Burro, U-Haul, Eggcamper. There may be others, but they "escape" me at the moment. bolers, Scamps, Casitas, Trilliums, etc. are single hull (but often with effective insulation).
From my perspective there are actually three main advantages to the double-walled construction: insulation, ease of attaching anything inside without piercing the hull, and general ease of snaking wires for whatever electrical stuff you may want.
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Old 08-02-2007, 09:16 AM   #4
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Not sure of this, but I don't think all the Burros have insulation between the walls. Not sure of UHaul.


Easy to stick those Power Lock Suction things to the walls. Get em at Walmart and Bed Bath and Beyond.

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Old 08-02-2007, 09:28 AM   #5
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Is the eggcamper double hulled, or just has molded furniture that is fiberglassed together at points? The pics look like a combination of both.

their description is ambiguous.

Quote:
Cabin construction,

Molded and bonded uni-body construction is a strong part of the eggcamper design philosophy using large area molds to produce both exterior and interior sections, complete with seating, storage cabinets and kitchen features adding strength and durability without unnecessary weight.

The bright white gel coat finish makes cleaning fast and easy,
Foil faced space blanket insulation / glass core between the inner and outer shells is standard, adds comfort and reduces the cost of heating and cooling.

The molded and bonded uni-body construction eliminates many mechanical fasteners used in traditional stick and staple RVs, creating a strong very light weight leak free cabin.

Frame, tires and suspension

Formed structural channel from coupler to bumper makes a strong durable frame, superior to tubing that can rust from within the enclosed sections.

205-80R14 tires are standard.

The Dexter rubber ride axle provides a smooth and quiet ride in a well-proven design. Electric brakes are standard.
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Old 08-02-2007, 10:30 AM   #6
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And... I've never had a Casita, but I can tell you that the insulation and rat fur used by Scamp is very effective. In any event, most of the heat loss in any of these trailers is through the windows and the door opening. My Burro was double-walled and insulated; my Scamp 16 and 19 (both Custom Deluxes) performed just as well in the cold (actually to my surprise) as did the Burro!

I was and continue to be most impressed with the Bigfoot's dual-thermopane windows and the Bigfoot cold-weather performance.

Roger
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Old 08-02-2007, 10:33 AM   #7
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Although most Bigfoot designs (and all recent ones) have effective insulation, I have not heard of one which is really double-walled. They have a single-wall moulded fiberglass shell, rigid expanded polystyrene foam board insulation, and various arrangements of paneling over the insulation to finish the interior. They also use the cabinetry and wooden structures and panels more than most "eggs" to complete the structure - they need to do this in part due to their broad and flat roof design. They may be the obvious choice given the requirement (an inch or two of EPS foam is substantial insulation, and I agree that the windows are important), but not because of a double-wall design.
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Old 08-02-2007, 11:22 AM   #8
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I wonder if insulation in the form of that expanding foam spray could be used in U-Hauls and the old Burros to fill the open areas in the walls. Of course, you'd need to have your wiring, etc. in A-1 shape before you sealed it up with this stuff but it would have to help, assuming it wouldn't expand and explode the walls...

This begs a question--do these things sweat badly in cold weather? I have an old stick-built truck camper balanced on blocks down in my woods we use as a cabin and if two of us are in there it gets pretty sweaty, especially on the old-fashioned windows. I assume my U-Haul will do the same thing going on the fact that every screw and steel item in it is rusty.
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Old 08-02-2007, 11:37 AM   #9
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FYI--Our '82 Scamp has ensolite on the walls. We have found that it's very easy to heat with just a little electric cube heater, however, it's harder to cool on a really hot day.
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Old 08-02-2007, 12:26 PM   #10
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Effective insulation for cold weather is a two-edged sword -- If you get an insulated egg heat-soaked in direct sun during the day (parked or driving), it takes a loooong time to cool it down in the evening and night.

That might explain why Texas Casitas have less insulation than Minnesota Scamps and the eggs built in CA.

As I understand it, insulation between the walls was an option on Burros, so one would have to remove something or make a hole to check.

I would highly advise against using expanding foam products in a double-wall egg unless one absolutely knows and has experience with the product -- Some expand so much that things move.... (Voice of Experience speaking here )
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Old 08-02-2007, 01:57 PM   #11
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If my Burro is any indication it is easy to check to see whether there is insulation. Just open one of the cabinet doors (under the seats, under the kitchen sink) and insulation is either there or it is not. Mine has the aluminum foil with pink fiberglass style, with the foil reinforced with strands of some kind of stringy stuff. By looking in there and in between the cabinet shell and toward the outer shell it will all become clear. Without insulation the sun would also give the insides a strong "glow" from the rays penetrating, so it is very easy to figure out whether insulated or not.
I have yet to experience "sweating" and I am guessing it is caused by one of two things: inadequate ventilation, or some water leak that has infested the thing and is gradually supplying unnatural levels of moisture from items unseen.
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Old 08-02-2007, 02:05 PM   #12
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OR.. stand inside on a sunny day.

The whole inside will have an Orange Glow on the walls, especially where the sun is hitting.
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Old 08-02-2007, 03:41 PM   #13
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I have owned two Trail Mites. they both were double walled foam cored. the dogs & I would stay warm at 9500 ft just before the first snow.and cool in the summer with all the windows open.the only heat came from cooking & my colman lantern before we tucked in at night. know we got a white trailer with rug wall & all the goodies.
will let u know how much heat we need after our fishing this year. LEE
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Old 08-02-2007, 04:21 PM   #14
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I'm with Pete on the expanding foam stuff. NOT a good idea.

Just look in any of the lower cabinets on the Burro where you can see through to the outside shell, and you'll see pink fiberglass batting... or not. If it's there, it's insulated.

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Old 08-02-2007, 07:25 PM   #15
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I think the Oliver travel trailers are double walled and insulated. Supposedly the pipes are insulated.
I just wish I could get the guy to call me back.
Their web site says coming soon. Well I can wait until maybe next spring, no longer than that
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Old 08-03-2007, 07:43 AM   #16
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And... I've never had a Casita, but I can tell you that the insulation and rat fur used by Scamp is very effective. In any event, most of the heat loss in any of these trailers is through the windows and the door opening. My Burro was double-walled and insulated; my Scamp 16 and 19 (both Custom Deluxes) performed just as well in the cold (actually to my surprise) as did the Burro!

I was and continue to be most impressed with the Bigfoot's dual-thermopane windows and the Bigfoot cold-weather performance.

Roger
This is great to know about Scamp's insulation! It's not like I'm going to live in the thing, all winter or anything, I just would like to be able to use it fairly comfortably a half dozen times or so, in Minnesota winters. Based on all the response here I believe I will keep my options open to single wall campers too and not just limit myself to a double wall/insulated camper. I have seen some examples here of people coping Scamps insulation technique and it is good to know I could in the same manner to whatever trailer I end up with, if needed.

Thank you everyone for all the great input. I really do appreciate it!

ScottK
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Old 02-22-2008, 08:19 AM   #17
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This is great to know about Scamp's insulation! It's not like I'm going to live in the thing, all winter or anything, I just would like to be able to use it fairly comfortably a half dozen times or so, in Minnesota winters. Based on all the response here I believe I will keep my options open to single wall campers too and not just limit myself to a double wall/insulated camper. I have seen some examples here of people coping Scamps insulation technique and it is good to know I could in the same manner to whatever trailer I end up with, if needed.

Thank you everyone for all the great input. I really do appreciate it!

ScottK
>
Was just cruising through older posts and found this slightly dated post of a subject that is exactly the one that caused us to make our decision when buying a new TT.
I guess that the frames and insulation were major factors in this decision process.
Here is a link to a photo album where a couple of different frame types may be compared. They are a commonly used steel frame type and an aluminum frame being used by Oliver, made in Tennessee.
http://s262.photobucket.com/albums/i...tpartee/Frame/
This link is to an online album of a Oliver being made to one owners specifications. I find it particularly intresting that they will install a solar panel for the new owner. Note the high tech "lizzard skin" insulation being used on both inner and outer shells. This link is also a pretty good look at how the Oliver is made, as it progresses along:
http://s262.photobucket.com/albums/ii120/r...arks%20Trailer/
EDIT to add note: this second link has two pages of photos and shows the fiberglass molds that are being used, as well as the shells before and after the cut outs are made.
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Old 02-22-2008, 09:29 AM   #18
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When I recently toured the Northern Lite factory I particularly noticed the insulation on those units. Fiberglass shell, rigid insulation, interior panelling, a "double thick" headliner. Looked well insulated but did not have two walls of fiberglass.
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Old 03-03-2008, 12:14 PM   #19
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The Oliver has double wall construction with "Lizard Skin" insulation between. They refer to the inner shell as the "yolk."

Sandra
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Old 03-03-2008, 02:07 PM   #20
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In regards to Casita,
The "carpeting/insulation" on the walls & ceiling is quite effective. The only improvement I would wish for would be dual pane windows. The Coleman air conditioner has handled temps in excess of 100 degrees, and a small electric "cube" heater has kept us comfortable down into the lower "teens". Winterizing by draining the water systems is still necessary. We rarely require the air conditioner if able to be parked in the shade. Since we usually travel with a dog, and shade isn't often available, we are sometimes forced to run our propane-fueled generator to keep "Destiny" (our black Lab) cool. Sight-seeing (like at the Railroad Museum in Bishop, Ca. in August) or shopping while parked in a sunny parking lot are examples. Otherwise the Fantastic Fan handles the chore of keeping us cool.
Kurt & Ann K.

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