12 Volt Compressors/Air Pumps. - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-10-2010, 06:01 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Chester Taje's Avatar
 
Name: Ches
Trailer: 1992 Kustom Koach 17 FT
British Columbia
Posts: 4,897
A question asked on another thread about air pumps.

I need to do a winterizing on the fly and wondered if the little 12 volt pumps could be used to blow out the water lines? Any thoughts?
__________________

__________________
Retired Underground Coal Miner.
Served in Canadian Army (1PPCLI)
Chester Taje is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2010, 06:10 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Name: Darwin
Trailer: 2002 19 ft Scamp 19 ft 5th Wheel
Posts: 3,030
Send a message via Yahoo to Darwin Maring
The thing is, they are slow to pump up a tire so they may not have enough umph to push out all the water. Some of the water may return to low locations.

I think the reason they burn out is because they are so slow and get really hot. When you read the instructions they state to not run them over a certain length of time.

Northern tool has one that you DIAL IN the pressure setting you want and it shuts off when it reaches it. This really handy as you do not have to watch over it.
__________________

__________________
Darwin Maring is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2010, 11:28 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Trailer: 17.5 ft and 25 ft FB Bigfoot
Posts: 194
Darwin,

I think you hit on my concern, that one of these little pumps does not have enough cfm's (cubic feet per meter) which is a measurement of how much air is moving through a space in a fixed time. The little pumps have force to pump to 80 or more lbs/sq" but not the cfm so there wouldn't be enough consistent pressure in the line to push to water out.

But, I posted the original question and others may have other experience or an alternative type of pump. Again, any thoughts?
__________________
Tamid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2010, 01:18 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Trailer: Casita 17 ft Liberty Deluxe
Posts: 214
Here is another thing to consider as you winterize:

The compressed air may work fine for the water lines, including the traps......except for the P trap between shower pan and the grey water tank. Even if a Hepvo valve is installed, I wonder if some residual water may remain in the nearly horizontal valve, which could cause freezing problems.

I just replaced the Shower Slide valve in our 2003 17' LD Casita, thinking I was all set. But then I noticed that the rubber P trap was leaking from some cracks in the rubber. That could have been caused by aging, or it could have been failure due to expanding freezing water in the trap this last winter, when we had many days of freezing weather, sometimes approaching zero.

I may have to drain the P trap each winter, remove it to avoid a second failure, or pour a few cups of antifreeze directly into the shower pan. Alternatively, I might modify the rubber cup of a Plumbers Friend ("Plunger" to some people) to place it over the shower drain and inject compressed air thru the original threaded hole for the handle.

Just a thought,

Mike
__________________
Mike Price is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2010, 04:36 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Name: Darwin
Trailer: 2002 19 ft Scamp 19 ft 5th Wheel
Posts: 3,030
Send a message via Yahoo to Darwin Maring
Here is something to be concerned about when using one of those small air pumps. They have a piston inside and have a lubricant on them. Run them to long and the piston / cylinder head gets to hot and they burn out.

Using a piston type on your water line has the potential of injecting some lubricant along with the air and it could cause a bad taste to the water.

The type of air compressor that will not introduce oil into the system is a diagram type. They can be purchased for <$100.
__________________
Darwin Maring is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2010, 05:17 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Trailer: 17.5 ft and 25 ft FB Bigfoot
Posts: 194
Quote:
Here is something to be concerned about when using one of those small air pumps. They have a piston inside and have a lubricant on them. Run them to long and the piston / cylinder head gets to hot and they burn out.

Using a piston type on your water line has the potential of injecting some lubricant along with the air and it could cause a bad taste to the water.

The type of air compressor that will not introduce oil into the system is a diagram type. They can be purchased for <$100.
Darwin,

That is a good point. I have a type of compressor that is oil-less and an other that has an oil trap and use both to winterize. However, I don't think I run either long enough to introduce a significant amount of oil into my system although
some on this forum may say it is hard to define significant.
__________________

__________________
Tamid is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Two 6 volt vs. 12 volt deep cycle kevin242 Electrical | Charging, Systems, Solar and Generators 15 05-13-2017 10:52 AM
Shurflow pumps Kathy L Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 2 08-30-2009 12:22 PM
Hand pumps anyone? francene Care and Feeding of Molded Fiberglass Trailers 16 08-17-2009 10:20 PM
Air pumps jamessue Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 7 04-06-2009 12:12 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:20 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.