1986 13' Casita, Replacing carpet, looking for template - Fiberglass RV



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Old 03-24-2019, 05:14 PM   #1
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Name: Shelane
Trailer: Casita
UT
Posts: 13
1986 13' Casita, Replacing carpet, looking for template

Bought our casita from a neighbor, they had done all the gut work and mostly rehabbed it. Used stiff rubber backed carpet squares that did not stay stuck so we are removing them and replacing with reflectix and carpet my husband sourced that is designed for (cargo trailer) walls.

In reading random threads, I've come across a few posts referencing using the original carpet pieces as templates for the new. As we don't have this luxury, I'm wondering if anyone remembers how the carpet is generally pieced, if anyone would be willing do make a quick explanation or sketch of how many pieces, where the seams are, just to give me a starting point to save me from reinventing the wheel.
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Old 03-25-2019, 09:59 AM   #2
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Name: Robert
Trailer: Casita
Oregon
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Here's a strategy to try -

Find a bunch of sizable pieces of corrugated cardboard from old boxes.

Cut and fit them into various parts of the floor area starting in one corner.

Fasten them together with a hot glue gun.

Carefully lift them out of the trailer.

Then, you have a perfect template.

OR, there are several variations of this same concept that can work.
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Old 03-25-2019, 10:05 AM   #3
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Name: Shelane
Trailer: Casita
UT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobblangley View Post
Here's a strategy to try -

Find a bunch of sizable pieces of corrugated cardboard from old boxes.

Cut and fit them into various parts of the floor area starting in one corner.

Fasten them together with a hot glue gun.

Carefully lift them out of the trailer.

Then, you have a perfect template.

OR, there are several variations of this same concept that can work.
Would this work well on the walls as well as the floor? That's where I'm getting hung up.
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Old 03-25-2019, 12:00 PM   #4
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Name: Alan
Trailer: 1983 Casita & 1972 home-built
Oregon
Posts: 15
You can use reference marks and a numbering system and pics to locate the individual pattern pieces together instead of gluing them into one large pattern which may be hard to get out in one piece.



If the outside of the trailer is about the same radius as the inside curve, you can piece together the walls and ceiling patterns laying over instead of hanging off inside. With the material facing into the trailer, you can mark, cut, and practice fit the "back" of the pattern more easily and then shrink the shapes to accommodate the actual inside dimensions as needed.


A handy method for scribing fairly one-dimensional curves is to put initial pattern pieces down that approximate the curve to an inch or so. Then set your dividers/pencil compass to the largest gap in the pattern. You can drag the compass along the trailer surface for fairly straight lines, or make sets of points on curves by marking one divider width away from the trailer surface, then rotating the divider left leg 90 degrees and marking another divider width there, then rotating the other divider leg back to the trailer side, etc, etc. You end up with a series of crosshairs following the trailer part one divider width away. On curves you need to keep the divider legs pointed at the center of the curve (mark a point for reference) while marking the distance away from the trailer. Then you can move your scribed piece onto another test pattern, and reproduce the same set of points off your pattern crosshairs onto the test piece. The smaller the divider setting, the more accurate the pattern, but you may develop a mental illness and severe finger cramps doing this. I did.


It can also be handy to use salvaged clear bubble packaging pieces for making patterns in complex places. Put the clear piece up against some reference points, bend as needed, and you can sharpie the salient features on the pattern while looking right through it.


Remember to keep the flooring seams in a place where they won't get stressed by constant traffic and wet shoes.
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Old 03-25-2019, 11:31 PM   #5
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Name: Shelane
Trailer: Casita
UT
Posts: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by ARVZ View Post
You can use reference marks and a numbering system and pics to locate the individual pattern pieces together instead of gluing them into one large pattern which may be hard to get out in one piece.



If the outside of the trailer is about the same radius as the inside curve, you can piece together the walls and ceiling patterns laying over instead of hanging off inside. With the material facing into the trailer, you can mark, cut, and practice fit the "back" of the pattern more easily and then shrink the shapes to accommodate the actual inside dimensions as needed.


A handy method for scribing fairly one-dimensional curves is to put initial pattern pieces down that approximate the curve to an inch or so. Then set your dividers/pencil compass to the largest gap in the pattern. You can drag the compass along the trailer surface for fairly straight lines, or make sets of points on curves by marking one divider width away from the trailer surface, then rotating the divider left leg 90 degrees and marking another divider width there, then rotating the other divider leg back to the trailer side, etc, etc. You end up with a series of crosshairs following the trailer part one divider width away. On curves you need to keep the divider legs pointed at the center of the curve (mark a point for reference) while marking the distance away from the trailer. Then you can move your scribed piece onto another test pattern, and reproduce the same set of points off your pattern crosshairs onto the test piece. The smaller the divider setting, the more accurate the pattern, but you may develop a mental illness and severe finger cramps doing this. I did.


It can also be handy to use salvaged clear bubble packaging pieces for making patterns in complex places. Put the clear piece up against some reference points, bend as needed, and you can sharpie the salient features on the pattern while looking right through it.


Remember to keep the flooring seams in a place where they won't get stressed by constant traffic and wet shoes.
Your thoughts about using the outside of the walls and using a compass to scribe make sense to my brain. I like them! I can see how getting a good rough draft outside and then fine tuning it with the compass inside would work well. Thanks for the ideas!
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