1986 Boler Floor Construction? Need Fix Ideas? - Fiberglass RV


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Old 10-20-2017, 09:49 PM   #1
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Name: Greg
Trailer: 1986 Boler 1300
New Brunswick
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1986 Boler Floor Construction? Need Fix Ideas?

I recently purchased a 1986 Boler 1300 and noticed the floor flexing in the main standing area. I assumed water had rotted the wood between the two layers of fiberglass since the windows and vent had been leaking. After removing the top layer of fiberglass I was really surprised by the construction! Instead of one solid piece of plywood they had sandwiched several strips of wood between the fiberglass (looks original from manufacturer). The flex in the floor was from the wood strips moving independently as you walked across. The strips all appear to be dry. I tried removing the wood strips but they very well bonded to the bottom layer of fiberglass and as you try to remove them it will tear the fiberglass skin underneath.

I was thinking of filling all the voids between the wood strips with fiberglass resin and then gluing a solid piece of 3/8" plywood(or maybe stronger?) over top the strips. I would finish everything by applying a new layer of fiberglass on top of the wood. At this point, I'm really looking for ideas and opinions on how to fix the issue.
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Old 10-21-2017, 10:51 AM   #2
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if your wood strips are thick enough to hold the screws for a half inch solid piece of marine ply, I would just screw/glue it on and forget about the top Fiberglas. You can then varnish the new plywood or cover it with vinyl/linoleum or floor tiles. The top layer of fiberglass does not add any strength to your floor the way that was installed.
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Old 10-21-2017, 10:53 AM   #3
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Name: MURRAY
Trailer: Ventura
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Floor

Good morning
The plywood floor looks like wafer board. This was used in house construction at one time for the sub floor. How it ever got approved for this is amazing.
Over time it absorbs moisture and swells. This may or may not be very noticeable but the fibres of wood are separating from each other. The glue was also not the best. This of course weakens the floor. Now we have what is called OSB (oriented stran board).
Looks quite the same but is a much better product. Check it out thoroughly before you sandwhich this back together. Take a peace of this to a good builder or lumber store for an opinion. Good luck.
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Old 10-21-2017, 10:58 AM   #4
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Fllor

Jokra is abolutely correct.
The way this was made, the top layer of fibreglass adds no strength.
For a structure made of fibreglass on both sides with wood in between the fibreglass has to be bonded to both sides making it a monolithic structure.
Good luck
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Old 10-21-2017, 01:33 PM   #5
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Name: bob
Trailer: Was A-Liner now 13f Scamp
Missouri
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flooring

I have that junk in my 41 year old house don't ever get water on it. You get to redo your floor what a joke this stuff was.

I still see it!

bob
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Old 10-21-2017, 09:27 PM   #6
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Name: Greg
Trailer: 1986 Boler 1300
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Well like you guys said, after I completely removed the top layer of fiberglass I realized there was no sense in trying to salvage the junk wood. Some piece appeared to have absorbed a little water and the edges. Unfortunately the only way to remove it was to also cut the bottom layer of fiberglass along with it in one piece. The rear dinette is constructed the same manner but all the wood was dry and well bonded to the fiberglass because of the minimal foot traffic. I plan on replacing the entire floor in sections but now my dilemma is can I take the shell off the frame before replacing the floor? Will raising the body without the middle floor section cause issues? I would prefer replacing the floor after inspecting and painting the frame if it can be done first so that I know I have a solid base.
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Old 10-21-2017, 10:43 PM   #7
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Name: bill
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That sure looks like OSB (oriented strand board) flooring to me. Why it is in strips is beyond me. The adhesive used in OSB is nothing great (I used to make it). But OSB is used in a lot of floor construction on RVs as well as homes (and roof underlayment too).

"OSB is now used for about 70 percent of all floor, wall and roof sheathing in North America. Building codes, the Engineered Wood Association, architects and most builders rate plywood and oriented strand board equal in strength and durability.Jun 20, 2017"

Since OSB is typically a lot cheaper than plywood, it is the product of choice by many manufacturers and builders.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oriented_strand_board
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Old 10-21-2017, 10:50 PM   #8
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Name: mensie
Trailer: Boler
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Originally Posted by smyth26 View Post
Well like you guys said, after I completely removed the top layer of fiberglass I realized there was no sense in trying to salvage the junk wood. Some piece appeared to have absorbed a little water and the edges. Unfortunately the only way to remove it was to also cut the bottom layer of fiberglass along with it in one piece. The rear dinette is constructed the same manner but all the wood was dry and well bonded to the fiberglass because of the minimal foot traffic. I plan on replacing the entire floor in sections but now my dilemma is can I take the shell off the frame before replacing the floor? Will raising the body without the middle floor section cause issues? I would prefer replacing the floor after inspecting and painting the frame if it can be done first so that I know I have a solid base.
When you lift the body off the frame the floor will stay on the frame , the floor where the dinette is and the front will go with the body.
The floor is most likely screwed down with machine screws and rivets.
I just replaced my floor with 3/4" pressure treated plywood my original floor was not fiberglassed in like yours as mine is a 1970/71 .
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Old 10-21-2017, 11:09 PM   #9
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Thanks Mensie! So I should be okay to lift the body before replacing the floor. Do you mind sharing the steps you took to taking the body off the frame?
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Old 10-22-2017, 07:04 AM   #10
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Bill my house was built in 76 I watched all this stuff go in my house no complaints except why put it in kitchen floors and bathroom floors?


don't ask me why I know?


bob
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Old 10-22-2017, 09:58 AM   #11
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Name: mensie
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Originally Posted by smyth26 View Post
Thanks Mensie! So I should be okay to lift the body before replacing the floor. Do you mind sharing the steps you took to taking the body off the frame?
It is actually quite simple, undo all the screws that are screwed in from the floor to the frame, but the majority are under the seat bunks in your dinette, so it might be easier to remove those bunks.
If the heads are stripped grind them off.

There are also screws in the closet.

take 2 9 or 10' 4x4 one for the front one for the rear so you can block it up outside the body with. remove the wheels, Jack the trailer up bit by bit so the whole unit is off the ground.
block the whole unit and you might have the push down on the hitch and bumper or jump inside and the frame should just pop off. you can either put some small dollys or smaller wheels on the frame and slowly pull the frame away from underneath it.

To put the new frame underneath it reverse the steps.

When you replace the new floor make sure that you leave about a 1/4 gap around the perimeter so the wall from the closet and counter slide between the frame and the floor.

I'm posting a few picture but unfortunately they are sideways and don't know how to straighten them.
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IMG_1826.jpg   IMG_1834.jpg  

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Old 10-24-2017, 05:45 AM   #12
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I just refloored my Burro. I ripped out the old carpet and found a very irregular surface. I put in a new subfloor of "Advantech". It looks like chipboard, but is completely waterproof. I think it is impregnated with resin. I covered it with vinyl planks.
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Old 10-24-2017, 07:57 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by k0wtz View Post
Bill my house was built in 76 I watched all this stuff go in my house no complaints except why put it in kitchen floors and bathroom floors?


don't ask me why I know?


bob
Yes, they used particle board in my kitchen and bathrooms on my 1979 house. The reason? Its super smooth, smoother than plywood and a lot smoother than OSB. Smooth is what you need to lay tile/linoleum. Nowdays they sell tile board which is also smooth but water resistant. Particle board was a terrible choice under tile in areas that will see water.
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Old 10-24-2017, 08:29 AM   #14
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to do it right

I am not a tile guy but I laid 450 tile in my new bathroom to do this stuff right you need concrete board. Heavy heavy you better have a well supported floor don't ask me why I know this.

Correct procedure lay down subfloor glue and screws the concretes board, then tile glue then tiles.

I replaced all my kitchen cabinents redid the floors too not to the extent for the tiles but I wont have problems any more for the next guy!

When these trailers were built they should have used marine plywood for the floor. Would cost them what 30bux at the most.

bob
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