Best double sided tape - Fiberglass RV


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Old 09-04-2018, 03:57 PM   #1
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Best double sided tape

I just bought a 120 watt flexible solar panel. I'd like to install it with double sided tape if at all possible. I'm putting it on the very curvy roof of a Bonair Oxygen. I've read posts on here over the years where people have recommended certain types of very strong tape. Can someone on here point me in the right direction. What is your favorite?
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Old 09-04-2018, 07:01 PM   #2
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Has anyone here tried taping a flexible solar panel to a roof?
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Old 09-04-2018, 07:06 PM   #3
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3M VHB is the best, I used it to mount my solar panel mounts to my roof, I can’t remember the part number, I think it’s like 45# per square inch, it is the one used to attach windows on skyscrapers. Just be sure when you tape your panels down to leave gaps to help get rid of heat and water from under your panels. “Google” is your friend!
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Old 09-04-2018, 07:15 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Speedbump View Post
3M is the best, I used it to mount my solar panel mounts to my roof, I canít remember the part number, I think itís like 45# or 90# per square inch, it is the one used to attach windows on skyscrapers. Just be sure when you tape your panels down to leave gaps to help get rid of heat and water from under your panels. ďGoogleĒ is your friend!
Thanks, Is this readily available in a local box hardware store? How is it doing in your application.
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Old 09-04-2018, 07:25 PM   #5
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There are three variables in the tape:

1) Adhesive type
2) Foam firmness/conformability
3) Tape thickness

Then in the material to adhere too, there is the "energy" of it (seems to be related to hardness vs. plasticity for the most part), and the relative flatness of it.

********************Mine has been perfect for 2 years now. Below is where I got my information from. This is from a camper forum installing solar on fiberglass roofs.—- I used the 1” #4952 from Amazon**************************

VHB 4941 Seems to be the "all purpose" VHB that many use. Multi-purpose adhesive and conformable foam.

VHB 4950 May be what AM solar uses (but not sure). We used this on buddy's SMB and so far so good (one 1,500 mile drive in pouring rain and hot to freezing temps done so far). General purpose acrylic adhesive, firm foam.

VHB 5952 The favorite of the 3M tech support fellow for my description of use (aluminum angle feet to polyester-resin gelcoated fiberglass). Modified acrylic adhesive, and very conformable foam.

Tech did also mention that 4941 would also be "fine."

1.1 mm seems to be the right thickness (is also the most common).
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Old 09-04-2018, 07:29 PM   #6
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Our solar panel blew off!! - Escape Trailer Owners Community
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Old 09-04-2018, 07:32 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedbump View Post
There are three variables in the tape:

1) Adhesive type
2) Foam firmness/conformability
3) Tape thickness

Then in the material to adhere too, there is the "energy" of it (seems to be related to hardness vs. plasticity for the most part), and the relative flatness of it.

********************Mine has been perfect for 2 years now. Below is where I got my information from. This is from a camper forum installing solar on fiberglass roofs.ó- I used the 1Ē #4952 from Amazon**************************

VHB 4941 Seems to be the "all purpose" VHB that many use. Multi-purpose adhesive and conformable foam.

VHB 4950 May be what AM solar uses (but not sure). We used this on buddy's SMB and so far so good (one 1,500 mile drive in pouring rain and hot to freezing temps done so far). General purpose acrylic adhesive, firm foam.

VHB 5952 The favorite of the 3M tech support fellow for my description of use (aluminum angle feet to polyester-resin gelcoated fiberglass). Modified acrylic adhesive, and very conformable foam.

Tech did also mention that 4941 would also be "fine."

1.1 mm seems to be the right thickness (is also the most common).
Exactly the type of info I was looking for. I do have round plastic solar mounting disks. It will probably be best to mount them and then the panel to the disks leaving a slight gap. The main reason I bought the flexible panel was to not hurt the aesthetics of the curved roof.
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Old 09-04-2018, 07:34 PM   #8
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Gordon2 Really, who did the install and did they scuff & use alchohol to clean BOTH surfaces before sticking down ? I did a LOT of research before I did mine ! What brand of tape?
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Old 09-04-2018, 07:36 PM   #9
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I was considering flexible, but I could not find one that would fit my mounting location.
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Old 09-04-2018, 07:38 PM   #10
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Falling off is somewhat of a concern as my trailer has been painted. I'm at the mercy of the tape sticking to the paint sticking to the gelcoat.
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Old 09-04-2018, 07:40 PM   #11
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As you see it has a very pronounced curve. Would be hard to mount a flat panel of any size.
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Old 09-04-2018, 07:50 PM   #12
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As you see it has a very pronounced curve. Would be hard to mount a flat panel of any size.
Yes Sir, thatís curved alright !
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Old 09-04-2018, 07:55 PM   #13
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Gordon2 Really, who did the install and did they scuff & use alchohol to clean BOTH surfaces before sticking down ? I did a LOT of research before I did mine ! What brand of tape?
Well its a long thread but the bottom line is that it appears that the gel-coat separated. Paint might also. There is much info on the 3M website that will help one figure out which VHB tape to use, how to use it, how to prepare mounting surfaces, etc. There is a good amount of science and engineering involved. Then there is need to create an air space if you want the panel(s) to work best, and last longer. So you end up with some sort of mount that is taped to the panel on one side and to the trailer on the other.

IMHO you are much more likely to have a successful installation is you use mechanical mounting to the roof with good backing to spread the wind load. But some people have used only VHB tape and been happy with it. Either they got lucky or they did their homework to do it right (or both).

I wonder what the objective is... you might be just as well off with a portable panel on the ground and a charge line for when you are traveling.
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Old 09-04-2018, 07:57 PM   #14
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Curved both ways. A very hard roof to mount to.
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Old 09-04-2018, 08:14 PM   #15
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Here's a great idea for leaving an air space. I just happen to have some of this left over from a green house project.

https://itechworld.com.au/blogs/lear...e-solar-panels
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Old 09-04-2018, 08:27 PM   #16
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Well its a long thread but the bottom line is that it appears that the gel-coat separated. Paint might also. There is much info on the 3M website that will help one figure out which VHB tape to use, how to use it, how to prepare mounting surfaces, etc. There is a good amount of science and engineering involved. Then there is need to create an air space if you want the panel(s) to work best, and last longer. So you end up with some sort of mount that is taped to the panel on one side and to the trailer on the other.

IMHO you are much more likely to have a successful installation is you use mechanical mounting to the roof with good backing to spread the wind load. But some people have used only VHB tape and been happy with it. Either they got lucky or they did their homework to do it right (or both).

I wonder what the objective is... you might be just as well off with a portable panel on the ground and a charge line for when you are traveling.


My objective is Iím lazy, I didnít want to deploy my solar and keep my batteries charged between uses while avoiding theft in this world today. This seemed to be the easiest way. I am also plotting an additional battery and solar on my truck topper that can be connected to my camper, I also carry a Honda 2000. Iím in engineering and my hobby is fabrication/building things. Just getting ready for retirement traveling soon!
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Old 09-05-2018, 06:40 AM   #17
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If you must: 3M automotive trim tape (used to permanently install molding on cars) Found at auto parts stores.


https://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/company-...3241071&rt=rud
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Old 09-05-2018, 06:51 AM   #18
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If you are not actively using the panel for powering a lot of devices a smaller 50 watt panel should be sufficient for keeping the battery topped up when it is sitting in the driveway. Going to larger panels will make it more difficult to get the panel to lay flat on that compound curve structure. The better companies do have return policies if you can't get it to lay flat enough.
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Old 09-05-2018, 07:12 AM   #19
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My objective is Iím lazy, I didnít want to deploy my solar and keep my batteries charged between uses while avoiding theft in this world today. ...
I was thinking more about battery maintenance vs major recharging. 80 watts is not much, but it is more than enough to use as a trickle charger, even if not getting much good sun. On the other hand, 80 watts (even in ideal conditions) might not be be enough to recharge the battery if you use a furnace, fan, etc, for longer periods of time. Need to crunch the numbers of course, and plan on days of little to no sun.
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Old 09-05-2018, 07:13 AM   #20
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.The better companies do have return policies if you can't get it to lay flat enough.
..I would never even ask to return a panel that I had stuck VHB tape all over. YMMV
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