Best fastener to install old style windows - Fiberglass RV


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Old 06-04-2010, 11:37 AM   #1
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I'm working on the interior trim that will go around the old style windows on my scamp. They were originally riveted directly to the fiberglass without any backing plate. I do not want to use rivets to re-install the windows. One option is to use a maple trim piece on the inside and use wood screws, but i'm wondering if they could loosen up in the future. I could also use a metal screw with nut and washer, and attach this to the fibergalss directly, or use the maple inside trim piece, or even use a piece of aluminum trim to match the windows.

My quesiton; has anyone used any of these methods, or different ones that worked out well?

Thanks
Dan
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Old 06-04-2010, 07:30 PM   #2
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How about stainless steel bolts and acorn nuts? With butyl tape the bolts don't need to be really heavy duty, between the two the window isn't going to fall out. If you go this route, just be certain to put a "plastic" washer between the head of the bolt and the aluminum frame.
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Old 06-04-2010, 07:40 PM   #3
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Don't know if you have cabinets above those windows, but I suspended the curtain rods around our dinette from the overhead cabinets.


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Old 06-04-2010, 11:41 PM   #4
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Hi Dan,
Well, I think the wood backing with sheet metal screws would work fine.
This is essentially what Trillium used to use. 3/4" ply behind the fiberglass
shell with sheet metal screws attaching the window frame to the wood through
the fiberglass shell and then ensolite over that. When I removed and replaced
my '78 trillium windows last year the plywood had been wet but did not have
dry rot. Make sure to use plenty of butyl tape. Here is a rough sketch.
Good Luck. Larry H


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Old 06-05-2010, 12:30 AM   #5
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Dan, this question gets asked quit a bit and you will receive different answers. I personally prefer to replace a rivet with a rivet. It's quicker, less expensive and allows the body to flex a little
I'm curious, your trailer is 34 years old and apparently the rivets have done a satisfactory job for 34 years.
This question is for everyone. Why change something that has lasted much longer than you will probably have the trailer?
The only time I have used anything other than rivets is when a hole has enlarged to the point that a rivet will not work.
I've refurbished at least 10 Eggs since I retired 5 years ago and have been curious why some people have an aversion to something that has a proven track record.

Good luck with your remodel Dan.

John
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Old 06-06-2010, 11:57 AM   #6
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Thanks for all the replies.

Donna, using stainless steel bolts and acorn nuts was one that I was considering. I was thinking of using a stainless lock washer instead of plastic, but will look into both.

Peter, thanks for the curtain details. I do have cabinets above the windows and I was looking a the IKEA curtain rods. Peter, do you have the bottom of your curtains attached to a rod? If not, do they hang out much?

Larry, thanks for the detail on trillium attachment. Did you re-use the plywood backers that were there?

Perry, the reason I'm changing over to something else is the rivets had failed in most areas to keep the water out. After removing the liner, I could see dark stained areas coming from most of them. In the process of restoring the trailer, I've done plywood tabbing to hang all the new cabinets, just to get ride of holes, and would like the remaining holes to have a fastener that could be tightened up in the future, or more easily removed if leaks do occur. I will still use rivets, but they are in areas that I do not have easy access to both sides of the wall. As a businessperson, I think the reason that rivets are used is to save time; money and they work reasonably well, which makes business sense. However, since Iím not as concerned with the time aspect, and the money is not that much compared to the rest of the restoring cost, I prefer to go with something else.
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Old 06-06-2010, 04:16 PM   #7
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Quote:
Thanks for all the replies.

Donna, using stainless steel bolts and acorn nuts was one that I was considering. I was thinking of using a stainless lock washer instead of plastic, but will look into both.

Peter, thanks for the curtain details. I do have cabinets above the windows and I was looking a the IKEA curtain rods. Peter, do you have the bottom of your curtains attached to a rod? If not, do they hang out much?

Larry, thanks for the detail on trillium attachment. Did you re-use the plywood backers that were there?

Perry, the reason I'm changing over to something else is the rivets had failed in most areas to keep the water out. After removing the liner, I could see dark stained areas coming from most of them. In the process of restoring the trailer, I've done plywood tabbing to hang all the new cabinets, just to get ride of holes, and would like the remaining holes to have a fastener that could be tightened up in the future, or more easily removed if leaks do occur. I will still use rivets, but they are in areas that I do not have easy access to both sides of the wall. As a businessperson, I think the reason that rivets are used is to save time; money and they work reasonably well, which makes business sense. However, since I'm not as concerned with the time aspect, and the money is not that much compared to the rest of the restoring cost, I prefer to go with something else.
Have you looked at chicago nuts with lock tite? I haven't used them for something like a window but I have used them for other things where I was looking for a flush finish.
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Old 06-06-2010, 09:34 PM   #8
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Seems to me that using rivets for curtain hangers is a great example of cost and production speed trumping common sense. I don't understand why the Scamp factory is so rivet-happy, since every one is a potential leak, not to mention being another unnecessary exterior pus-pimple.

Since I got roof repairs anyway I decided to eliminate as many as I can. I vote for Peter's solution.
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Old 06-07-2010, 01:12 PM   #9
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Mike and Sarah K, I did a search for Chicago nut and came up sex nut, which is the same thing. These look promising and I will look into it. I have seen these at my local hardware store. I need to find if they would come in a short enough length and other possible issues. If not used at the windows, I may use these at a awning rail that will have a few fasteners over the door opening, and I'm worried about hitting my head on them. Thanks for the idea.
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