Brake Wiring in the Scamp - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 03-05-2008, 10:11 PM   #15
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Name: Eddie
Trailer: 2014 Escape 21
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Based on the above, two out of three don't have problems. And the third only has problems if connections are soldered.

Seriously, I've never had a problem with crimped or wire-nut trailer connections on a long series of boat, utility and travel trailers except when the wires suffered physical damage by being crushed or pulled.

Even if it were not a potential problem, I wouldn't go to the trouble of soldering connections. I'm not trying for Mil-Spec, just good. Crimps and wire-nuts have been good in the past, and any future connections will be finished with dielectric grease.
I was getting my non-fiberglass trailers ready for their annual inspections this week. On my new-to-me cargo trailer I noticed it had a plastic junction box for the 7 pin pig tail. I opened the panel and found a fused 7 pin terminal strip. This works great for tying in the breakaway switch and all the terminal connections are protected. The junction box was made by Quest but I could not locate one locally. I did find a sealed 7 pin terminal strip box (W/O fuses) at Redneck and ordered two for my flat bed trailers. They arrived today and I was real pleased with the boxes. I plan order two more to install them in both of my Scamps with brakes. They go for around $20. ea. and make a neat looking wiring job.
Besides aiding in tying in the breakaway switch wiring, the breakaway battery boxes are now coming with sealed lead acid batteries with a charger lead. The box also lets you pick up vehicle 12 VDC at a convenient location to keep your break-away battery charged. The Redneck box also has strain relief clamps built into the box inside the sealed area and it comes with hardware.
Looks like I have about another week of packing bearings, replacing and adjusting brakes and fixing lights. At least trailers donít have engines and transmissions.


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Old 03-06-2008, 12:06 AM   #16
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i've worked @ two trailer manufacturers, & crimping w/dialectic grease is the way to go... & much easier to disassemble if you ever need to change/repair wiring...
--- steven
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Old 03-06-2008, 07:11 AM   #17
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I was getting my non-fiberglass trailers ready for their annual inspections this week. On my new-to-me cargo trailer I noticed it had a plastic junction box for the 7 pin pig tail. I opened the panel and found a fused 7 pin terminal strip. This works great for tying in the breakaway switch and all the terminal connections are protected. The junction box was made by Quest but I could not locate one locally. I did find a sealed 7 pin terminal strip box (W/O fuses) at Redneck and ordered two for my flat bed trailers. They arrived today and I was real pleased with the boxes. I plan order two more to install them in both of my Scamps with brakes. They go for around $20. ea. and make a neat looking wiring job.
Besides aiding in tying in the breakaway switch wiring, the breakaway battery boxes are now coming with sealed lead acid batteries with a charger lead. The box also lets you pick up vehicle 12 VDC at a convenient location to keep your break-away battery charged. The Redneck box also has strain relief clamps built into the box inside the sealed area and it comes with hardware.
Looks like I have about another week of packing bearings, replacing and adjusting brakes and fixing lights. At least trailers don't have engines and transmissions.
Thanks for the tip! I may end up with such a setup before I'm done. I am installing a breakaway battery with the charger in the box as you described. I'm mounting it under the front seat area of the Scamp near the rest of the wiring, running out through the same opening as the 7-wire cable to the breakaway switch.

Parker




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Old 03-06-2008, 12:46 PM   #18
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Note for the archives: If one already has a battery on board (aka 'house' battery), which is the case with most eggs, a separate battery for the break-away brake switch is not needed.
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Old 03-06-2008, 02:20 PM   #19
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Note for the archives: If one already has a battery on board (aka 'house' battery), which is the case with most eggs, a separate battery for the break-away brake switch is not needed.
I was heading that way myself, but was admonished by someone else here not to use the house battery. I forget the concern....the fridge may run it down if the car is not charging it for some reason, so the brakes won't work in a breakaway, or the breakaway switch will run down the house battery if activated, instead of just the small separate battery. Anyway, I decided to spend the 50 bucks and put one in. Probably a "nice to have" item in the long run, minus whatever maintenance it takes.

Just finished all the external wiring on the brakes (with crimp connectors ) while we had a little warming spell, so now I can move inside to make the final connections and not have to try to heat the garage.
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Old 03-06-2008, 04:03 PM   #20
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Here's an interesting tidbit I ran across in an axle PDF I downloaded from Redneck Trailer. Lots of good info in the PDF.


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Old 03-06-2008, 04:37 PM   #21
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The emergency brake kit includes the breakaway switch & cable, the battery, the box and electronics to keep it charged and isolated.

The battery box has an electronic circuit built in that charges the battery off the camper or Tow Vehicle 12VDC supply.

The Battery is Isolated so the camper and tow vehicle 12VDC supply canít run it down and it has LED lights to tell you when it is charging and a test to see if it is fully charged.

Check www.jcw.com www.harborfreight.com www.tractorsupply.com for pricing.
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Old 03-06-2008, 06:10 PM   #22
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I too usually solder rather than crimp. After soldering I heat shrink, and forget about it.
I have never had a solder connection fail, however I may not put on as many miles as everyone else.
I do use crimp connectors on large cables, #6 and bigger, but I use a hydraulic crimper on the lugs.

I have had many of the red,blue, and yellow crimps fail, they don't take well to corrosion. Cheap crimping tools also make poor joints
In the north up here we use a lot of salt, and any non heat-shrunk connection will fail, and sooner, not later.

If you need something to make connections inside the trailer , you could try something like these
insulated splices, use an allen key and a single wrap of tape and forget about it
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Old 03-07-2008, 04:29 PM   #23
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Well, since I started this thread, I guess I owe a report. Another job well done. I hope. I have the brakes and breakaway system all wired up and everything seems to work well. At the wheels, I crimped, greased, and used heat shrink. I used wirenuts for the connections in the front of the trailer in the same manner as Scamp. I'll admit that working through the opening under the front bunk putting wire nuts on up to as many as four wires in a group had me talking to myself. I finally taped the wires together before screwing on the wirenut, which made it much easier, and I could be sure that one of the wires wasn't slipping out of the nut before tightening. I did discover a factory installed problem which I was thankful to not discover on the road. Scamp installed the main power fuse with an in-line fuse holder crimped into the main 12V line and then taped over the crimp connectors. It look messy, so I untaped it and in the process, the wires popped right out of the crimp connector! They used yellow butt connectors designed for 10/12 wire, but the fuse holder was made with #14. I changed to a blue connector, which was tight on the #12 wires, but it worked much better on the #14 fuse wire. I always give a yank on crimp connectors; apparently the person who installed these hadn't learned that lesson yet. All-in-all, I'm pleased. I may still do something to tidy up the rat's nest of wires, but it's tucked under the rat fur and seems totally functional.

Thanks, everyone for sharing your expertise and experience with me. Now, on to a window repair!

Parker
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Old 03-07-2008, 05:35 PM   #24
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There are two of those in-line fuse holders -- One is located at the battery and the other is located in the uppper left hand corner of the underbunk storage closest to the door (maybe under the rat fur).

I personally don't like the in-line glass fuse holders, so I replaced the battery one with a blade fuse holder. Eventually I will also replace the under-bunk holder as well.
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Old 03-07-2008, 06:00 PM   #25
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I too usually solder rather than crimp. After soldering I heat shrink, and forget about it.
I have never had a solder connection fail, however I may not put on as many miles as everyone else.
I do use crimp connectors on large cables, #6 and bigger, but I use a hydraulic crimper on the lugs.
Ditto. For external wiring prone to corrosion I use sealing heat shrinkable tubing over soldered connection. Longer heat shrinkable tubing will prevent bending at the fragile soldered wire interface. Any water access to crimped or wing nut connection will cause corrosion on metal to metal interfaces which is not the case with soldered connection. I agree that solder connection is mechanically more fragile but I think it is easier to eliminate the bending force then to make a connection waterproof. Any electrical connection will ultimately fail if exposed to constant tension, compressive or bending forces so any wiring should be mechanically stable.

George.







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