Brakes for a uhaul CT13 - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 01-08-2012, 08:29 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by CindyL View Post
Tom,

Searching the historical postings for brakes only yields discussion postings by Kevin and me on our surge brakes and a discussion on the necessity of having brakes on a CT.

You might email Jim (webmaster) and/or Forest Field who is kind of the welcomer/resident specialist if you want access to uhaulcamper.com.

CindyL
Thanks, Cindy. On a separate note, what is the issue with your brakes? When I was a pup I worked at a trailer rental and used to service the surge brakes, so I know enough to be dangerous.
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Old 01-08-2012, 08:45 AM   #16
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I told Kevin to post here. I am clueless about this topic.

Kevin said he has two problems with the brakes, so I asked him if one was having a wife who wants electric brakes. He says that means that he now has 3 problems.

Cindy
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Old 01-08-2012, 09:01 AM   #17
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I told Kevin to post here. I am clueless about this topic.

Kevin said he has two problems with the brakes, so I asked him if one was having a wife who wants electric brakes. He says that means that he now has 3 problems.

Cindy


Nothing wrong with surge brakes, but in my experience, they don't like just sitting around. They seem to get air in the system if not used. As a mechanic, I rigged up a long lever to attach to the master cylinder on the coupler so I could stroke the cylinder and bleed them. There are also bleeders that use a small air pressure in the reservoir, available at auto parts store.
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Old 01-08-2012, 09:12 AM   #18
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So they will need to be bled after each episode of sitting around, i.e. winter?


I know bleeding is one of Kevin's problems.

CindyL
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Old 01-08-2012, 09:25 AM   #19
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There are also hand operated vacuum type bleeders. I have both the pressure type and vacuum type. The major problem with brakes that set around unused for periods of time is corrosion and leakage. Parts that have to move will rust and stick, wheel cylinders corrode and leak. And we could start a whole other discussion on what type of brake fluid to use, DOT 3 or silicone type. This is common problems for us vintage car & truck owners.
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Old 01-08-2012, 09:43 AM   #20
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Glad to hear that there might be someone with surge brake experience around! My two problems deal with: 1) getting brake fluid to come out of the driver's side brake system, and 2) getting the surge controller to move easily enough to bleed the brakes.

After I installed the new brake setup on the wheels, I was able to bleed the brake cylinder on the passenger side. However, I couldn't get anything out of the driver's side of the system. I'm not sure if the line is clogged with rust (it sat unused for many years), but it doesn't flow out like the other side.

The surge controller moved OK with a lever at that time, but when I couldn't get any fluid out of the driver's side, I put the job aside for a while and didn't get back to it for a few weeks. Now I can't seem to get the moveable hitch end to compress with the lever. It does move in and out a bit when hooked to the TV, but I don't have enough control over using the TV as the mechanism for moving the surge controller. Could the surge piston have become corroded so it doesn't move well? I know it shouldn't move too easily or it would be braking all the time with every start and stop.

When I added new brake fluid, I also couldn't seem to get the fluid down into the lower chamber of the reservoir. The directions say that it should bubble up slightly as the fluid goes into the lower area. Nothing seems to happen there, either.

Since the trailer is outside and the weather is supposed to turn colder this week, I probably won't get back to this until the spring. But it would be nice knowing what to try!
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Old 01-08-2012, 10:31 AM   #21
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Thumbs up Kevin, you made my day!

Quote:
Originally Posted by CindyL View Post
Kevin said he has two problems with the brakes, so I asked him if one was having a wife who wants electric brakes.
He says that means that he now has 3 problems.
...as Donna would say, "My eyes are leaking!"
For Kevin ->
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Old 01-08-2012, 10:45 AM   #22
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Kevin: I would disconnect the master cylinder and bleed it, or maybe just loosen the line and bleed at the master cylinder. There are cheap little kits for bleeding a master cylinder consisting of some plastic fittings and hoses. I would also remove the bleeder on the side that you can't get fluid out of and check to see if it is clear. Sometimes they will plug up with rust or dirt. I always put neverseize on the threads so that I have a better chance of loosening them next time. It's also possible that the wheel cylinder is stuck. It may be time for a complete system overhaul, new lines, master & wheel cylinders. I wonder if the master & wheel cylinders are available, if not they can be rebuilt unless they are badly pitted, and even then there are places that can bore & sleeve them. If you don't have a second person to assist with the bleeding process, a hose from the bleeder into a jar of brake fluid keeps air from being pulled back in when you release pressure from the master cylinder. Bob
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Old 01-08-2012, 01:14 PM   #23
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Kevin: I would disconnect the master cylinder and bleed it, or maybe just loosen the line and bleed at the master cylinder. There are cheap little kits for bleeding a master cylinder consisting of some plastic fittings and hoses. I would also remove the bleeder on the side that you can't get fluid out of and check to see if it is clear. Sometimes they will plug up with rust or dirt. I always put neverseize on the threads so that I have a better chance of loosening them next time. It's also possible that the wheel cylinder is stuck. It may be time for a complete system overhaul, new lines, master & wheel cylinders. I wonder if the master & wheel cylinders are available, if not they can be rebuilt unless they are badly pitted, and even then there are places that can bore & sleeve them. If you don't have a second person to assist with the bleeding process, a hose from the bleeder into a jar of brake fluid keeps air from being pulled back in when you release pressure from the master cylinder. Bob
Good advice. I suspect that Kevin should pull apart the master and slave cylinders (or are the slave cylinders new?) and have a look. They are probably rusty inside and sticky. Brake fluid is hygroscopic and once it attracts water, it condenses in the cylinders and rusts and pits them. I suspect that the seals are available. Worst case, buy a new surge brake coupler for $125.
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Old 01-08-2012, 01:16 PM   #24
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So they will need to be bled after each episode of sitting around, i.e. winter?

I know bleeding is one of Kevin's problems.

CindyL
Maybe, but they should be at least checked for sponginess.
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Old 01-08-2012, 02:46 PM   #25
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The Corvetts had to go to stainless steel sleeves in the slave cylinders and master cylinder. Tom, you know the magnet might clear the hub and only hit on the brake drum, so if it was flat, it would work.
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Old 01-08-2012, 03:55 PM   #26
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The Corvetts had to go to stainless steel sleeves in the slave cylinders and master cylinder. Tom, you know the magnet might clear the hub and only hit on the brake drum, so if it was flat, it would work.
We shall see.
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Old 01-08-2012, 04:06 PM   #27
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Kevin thinks it is the main mechanism that is on the tongue. I bought him one that came from one of Uhaul's axel trailers off ebay with my grandmother's inheritance money. He thought it safer since it was newer, but maybe it was bad. He did redo all the stuff back to and including the rims. I admit that I did not fall over myself being the other person when he wanted to bleed them. I remember doing that on our '69 Beetle and was not ready to do it when he was ready. I also think it is my desire to look into making them electric, so we don't need to worry about backing or proprietary parts when next we have a breakdown.

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Old 01-08-2012, 06:40 PM   #28
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We will be working on just that, I'll start mine next week
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