Burro floor wet under the linoleum: is this a condensation problem? - Page 4 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 01-17-2012, 07:31 AM   #43
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What happened to rest of this thread?
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Old 01-17-2012, 08:24 AM   #44
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As an addendum on the great Flange Controversy, it occurs to me that when the halves of Humpty were laid up, that flange was basically there to get em to "pop". All molds have draft or taper in the direction of eventual removal of the part (if they don't the part is very effectively trapped and the mold has to be destroyed to get it out). I have seen shallow draft molds from which parts jumped up or popped on their own and I have seen some that took a lot of compressed air and prying to lift. Can't pry without something to pry against so I'm guessing that the flange is primarily a place to put a wedge or crow and also some reinforcement to maintain the shape of the part at what becomes the centerline when mated with other half. More of a fabrication necessity than a contributor to final strength of the centerline joint.

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While I am not disagreeing with you on ease of extraction from the mold, Trilliums don't have a flange just a thickened band where the two halves meet. They also are notorious for belly band leak issues. Last Fall I got a chance to examine a new Scamp. I took particular note of how much better the belly band was constructed. The flange becomes the first line of defense against leaks with sealing the seam second. On Trilliums all you really have is the seam seal. Not as good in my opinion. Second , take a piece of sheet metal. Very easy to roll up. Now, bend one end 90* and try and roll it. Whether intentional or not, the flange has to add strength. Finally, good point on the taper of the mold. While obvious, it never occurred to me the limitations the mold puts on the appearance of the body. The shape of the Burro, in particular the lights, could not be easily done with a horizontal belly band. You couldn't get out it of the mold. Raz
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Old 01-17-2012, 11:01 AM   #45
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What happened to rest of this thread?
Jim, if you're wondering where the rest of the story has gone, I updated about the flange removal in the Winter Makeover thread here.

The short version is: I'm pretty doubtful the flange had any structural role and it's likely we made the whole thing stronger by joining the two hulls together on the outside that formerly had only been glued together on the inside.
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Old 01-17-2012, 08:09 PM   #46
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Raz, I agree that a right angle flange is the beginning of a load-bearing beam. Sort of an el beam if you will. I also agree on the tail light nacelles on the Sac City Burros. They look like a mold-maker's nightmare. The Escondido variant has recesses for the lights. The box shape protruding on the inside of the mold which creates the recess would appear to be a problem BUT, if you look close at the final product (half shell of egg) it's not. Why? There will be quiz. Here's a clue: the recess has only four sides rather than five; it's completely open in side elevation ; i.e., there is no obstruction normal to the direction of part removal.

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Old 01-17-2012, 08:30 PM   #47
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The short version is: I'm pretty doubtful the flange had any structural role and it's likely we made the whole thing stronger by joining the two hulls together on the outside that formerly had only been glued together on the inside.
The real stiffener is that big "el" in each half of the roof that allows the vertically-challenged to stand upright along the centerline of the trailer. I still wouldn't be jumpin up and down in the middle of the roof no matter how good the bond of the glass across the seam inside or outside. All that red and blue bondo! Makes me think Rucio should be primer (or Burro) grey. But silver is nice too.

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