Electric anode Casita - Fiberglass RV


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Old 10-22-2019, 09:35 AM   #1
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Name: Lee
Trailer: Casita
California
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Electric anode Casita

My son was going to change the anode and discovered the anode has an electric connection. Inquiring to a rv repair friend said this is an aftermarket add on to heat the water electrically. Now what? Do I get rid of it? I’ve never used my water heater in the time I’ve had this 2001 casita and want to dry camp, so will use the shower
There is a flat plug on an extension cord that comes up through a seat to an outlet. I assume this is to use with shore power to heat water. Is this a big problem?
Do I just use this to heat water when I have shore power and forget heating water by gas? No paperwork for this found, no idea what to even look for online to get more information.
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Old 10-22-2019, 10:21 AM   #2
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Name: bob
Trailer: 1984 u-haul ct13; 1996 Casita 17 Spirit Deluxe; 1946 Modernistic teardrop
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I installed one of these in our Casita 17. I think there is a couple different companies but the one we have is called Hott Rod. Bought it on Amazon. It replaces the anode rod in the water heater, so if you are not going to use it, it may be best to pull it out and install a new anode rod. There also should be a temperature sensor that sticks on to the water heater tank (insulation had to be cut away) that is part of the installation. We almost always camped where there was electric hookup so it worked good for us
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Old 10-22-2019, 10:36 AM   #3
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Name: Kenneth
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Wisconsin
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Electric water element

Most new anode rods are cheap ($5) and depending on the brand you have; the aftermarket heating element will not break the bank ($25?). If it is a quality installation with thermostat, Id replace it, if not you could save some money and put the rod back in. This one?? https://www.amazon.com/Camco-Hot-Wat...00BFU7QQ0?th=1
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Old 10-22-2019, 12:52 PM   #4
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Name: Lee
Trailer: Casita
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Ill try it first

This is new territory for me..wow, I could have had easy hot water where I had hookups. Who knew.
It does resemble the item in the link, but has more to it.
I will plug the trailer in and give it a try before I discard it...it looks like a professional install according to my tech savvy son.
I already bought a replacement regular anode so I will hang onto it. The man I bought my trailer from said he never used the water heater, so it must have been an upgrade by the original owner
Thanks for the replies.
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Old 10-22-2019, 01:30 PM   #5
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Name: Eddie
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Conversion kit anodes

Camco makes Anode bushings to work with water heater conversion kits. They replace the thread adapter that comes with the kit. Camco P/N 11645 is the 3/4" anode bushing for the Suburban W/H. The 1/2" version is for the Atwood W/H. You can keep your 115V conversion kit.
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https://www.amazon.com/Camco-11645-R.../dp/B016MXACRY
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Old 10-22-2019, 03:08 PM   #6
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Name: JD
Trailer: Scamp 16 Modified (BIGLY)
Florida
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Some water heaters should not have anode rods installed.
Those with aluminum tanks should not.
IIRC.
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Old 10-22-2019, 04:34 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redbarron55 View Post
Some water heaters should not have anode rods installed.
Those with aluminum tanks should not.
IIRC.

I don't understand. Why not?
What goes in the hole in an aluminum tank? One wouldn't use an aluminum anode. From the web: Magnesium for fresh water ONLY: Since fresh water is much less conductive than salt water, magnesium anodes are the best choice because they're more active (less noble) than zinc or aluminum
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Old 10-22-2019, 05:02 PM   #8
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Name: JD
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An anode rod is a solid metal cylinder that gets screwed into a water heater’s drain plug to prevent the steel water heater tank from rusting inside. They are made from aluminum, magnesium, or zinc, all metals that will “sacrifice” themselves through electrolysis and save the exposed steel water heater tank from a similar fate.

If you have a Suburban water heater, the tank is porcelain-lined steel and requires an anode rod to prevent corrosion of the steel tank. If you have an Atwood water heater, your water heater tank is aluminum and does not require one.
An anode rod is a solid metal cylinder that gets screwed into a water heater’s drain plug to prevent the steel water heater tank from rusting inside. They are made from aluminum, magnesium, or zinc, all metals that will “sacrifice” themselves through electrolysis and save the exposed steel water heater tank from a similar fate.

If you have a Suburban water heater, the tank is porcelain-lined steel and requires an anode rod to prevent corrosion of the steel tank. If you have an Atwood water heater, your water heater tank is aluminum and does not require one.

suburban-anode-water-heater-rod

Important Note: We have read about Atwood water heater owners who have installed anode rods in their drain plugs to prevent the steel threaded drain insert from corroding. This has been reported to be a source of potential leaks as the steel drain insert can eventually rust.
Adding an anode rod to an aluminum tank will actually increase the problems.
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Old 10-22-2019, 09:36 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redbarron55 View Post
Some water heaters should not have anode rods installed.
Those with aluminum tanks should not.
IIRC.
Maybe this explains why my tank has a plastic drain plug. I Don't know what brand the water heater is yet, or the material it is made from.
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