Ethanol or Proplene Glycol - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 09-29-2009, 04:50 PM   #15
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Chester,

Went back to the link you provided and the advertising blurb says the product is a combination of propylene glycol and ethanol. Interesting mixture. Instead of making a totally non-toxic product they've decided to make a half toxic product.
Kinda makes you wonder. I think the lesson here is to Really read your labels and know what it says and means.

The info on jug does not say anything about propylene glycol, but as you say its on there web site.
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Old 09-29-2009, 07:12 PM   #16
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Tamid,

The typical propylene glycol that is stacked up by the pallet load in late fall is rated to -50 Fahrenheit. But they also make "100 below" -- it's just not as commonly displayed.

I use the -50 in places that are open but might still have water in them that I don't want to freeze (say, in the bilge of a boat where if it did just start to freeze it would simply expand and there would be no real damage). But where it counts, I use the -100. That's not because it will get below -50 where I am (or was...), but because the possibility exists in pipes and the like for the solution to become slightly diluted with existing water.

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Old 09-30-2009, 06:26 AM   #17
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This topic is interesting as living in So. Florida we don't have to worry about winterizing but we do have many Canadians down here for the winter. I have been in conversations with some who claim to just drain their water in their homes and then blow the whole system out with compressed air, no mention of anti freeze. Is this not a possibility???? seems like it would be a lot less work.
All that being said I am originally a New Englander and although we have camped forever we never had a camper with running water back then. Started out in a mobile home with many freeze ups though. Ahhh the good ole days.............not
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Old 09-30-2009, 06:47 AM   #18
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I have been in conversations with some who claim to just drain their water in their homes and then blow the whole system out with compressed air, no mention of anti freeze. Is this not a possibility???? seems like it would be a lot less work.
It's discussed in the third paragraph here: HOW-TO “Winterize Your Fiberglass Travel Trailer”. Perhaps the rub, is it requires something to push the air... like a compressor?
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Old 09-30-2009, 06:51 AM   #19
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Yes it can be done, BUT you have to be very carefull to get ALL the water out.
I did it this way in my boat with no problems but then one year a line froze and broke.

I now blow the line then put the pink stuff in just the lines.

Bill K
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I have been in conversations with some who claim to just drain their water in their homes and then blow the whole system out with compressed air, no mention of anti freeze. Is this not a possibility???? seems like it would be a lot less work.
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Old 09-30-2009, 10:28 AM   #20
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Yep, yep, agreed. When I lived up north, we used to winterize docks (think of long water lines running out to each slip) by blowing the lines out with compressed air; you do have to be careful to get all the water out, and have no possibility for more water to leak/come in and settle in a low area.

We winterized boats the same way, but with a twist: We drained the system, then put in the anti-freeze, then drained that. That way, it was mostly air, yet any low or un-drainable areas would have a pool of antifreeze in them. (This used less anti-freeze, which makes a difference when you are doing hundreds of boats.)

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