Floor rot - Fiberglass RV


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Old 06-30-2007, 09:25 AM   #1
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Here's a shot of the worst of the floor rot in my new Trillium 5500. I am considering using epoxy to rebuild the area, instead of cutting it out. There is some sound wood here, and of course there is a seperate fiberglass floor underneath the plywood. Here is a link to the product I'm considering: Rot Doctor. It looks like a combination of the CPES and the Fill-It is the proper procedure.

Any feedback is appreciated! Alec
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Old 07-01-2007, 08:04 AM   #2
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Hmm. Depends. I'm a great believer in epoxy, having built a boat or three ala Bolger. I don't know about Trillium 5500 construction; if it's sealed with fibreglass underneath, it will have some support, and penetrating epoxy might do the trick. If the floor is exposed at the bottom (like Scamps), there'll be less support and you can get at it; I'd be tempted to cut it out and epoxy in a solid plywood patch. Congrats on the 5500, I couldn't find one when I was shopping.
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Old 07-01-2007, 09:53 AM   #3
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I tend to agree with Cam. Floor rot often displays itself as plywood delamination extending much further than the visible rot. I would cut out the offending piece, and make sure I get back to solid wood (no delaminations). I would epoxy and screw in a mating lip on the underside of the good floor, then epoxy in and screw the patch.

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Old 07-01-2007, 10:32 AM   #4
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I would third that.
There is never a better time to make sure the foundation of the trailer is solid and problem free for years to come than now while everything is exposed. Much more difficult to go back and redo it later.

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Old 07-01-2007, 11:20 AM   #5
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If the floor is not spongy, it may work and if the floor is spongy the rot is deeper and you have a bigger problem.

Iím not so sure epoxy alone will be enough. It would have to penetrate and saturate the wood fibers in order to have strength. Without penetration, it may crack.

In my model airplane days we would thin epoxy with alcohol for better penetration.

It may be possible to remove some of the top layer of wood in order to apply some fiberglass woven matt and along with the epoxy would surely enhance the strength.
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Old 07-01-2007, 04:31 PM   #6
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Thanks to all for the feedback. I think I will cut out the most offensive rot and patch in a new piece - other areas with shallower rot will get epoxied... Will post pics as I proceed - Thanks again! Alec
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Old 07-01-2007, 08:46 PM   #7
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Quote:
Here's a shot of the worst of the floor rot in my new Trillium 5500. I am considering using epoxy to rebuild the area, instead of cutting it out. There is some sound wood here, and of course there is a seperate fiberglass floor underneath the plywood. Here is a link to the product I'm considering: Rot Doctor. It looks like a combination of the CPES and the Fill-It is the proper procedure.
I've used something called 'Git Rot' on both a boat and on my Boler's floor. it's a relatively viscous epoxy type stuff that takes quite a while to cure... The idea is that you dry out your wood completely, then using a 1/4" drill, drill lots of shallow holes into the dryrot (not all the way through) and then mix the stuff up. Tediously dribble the stuff into the holes using a nail or bamboo skewer until all the holes are full. Then go back and start again. Keep going until the holes no longer take any more... Then slowly, over night, you'll discover that the git-rot has, through capillary action, gone and soaked all the dry rot area and hardened into an epoxy...

Here's where I applied the Git Rot.... It's available from Coast Marine, not Coast RV. It's about $15.

The floor on my boler feels solid now... I'd used it successfully on an old wooden row boat that I fixed up when I was a kid.. The transom was rotted along the top few inches... I applied git rot and after the boat was done, it held up to a 4hp evinrude bolted to the transom.
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Old 07-01-2007, 10:02 PM   #8
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Quote:
I've used something called 'Git Rot' on both a boat and on my Boler's floor. it's a relatively viscous epoxy type stuff that takes quite a while to cure... The idea is that you dry out your wood completely, then using a 1/4" drill, drill lots of shallow holes into the dryrot (not all the way through) and then mix the stuff up. Tediously dribble the stuff into the holes using a nail or bamboo skewer until all the holes are full. Then go back and start again. Keep going until the holes no longer take any more... Then slowly, over night, you'll discover that the git-rot has, through capillary action, gone and soaked all the dry rot area and hardened into an epoxy...

Here's where I applied the Git Rot.... It's available from Coast Marine, not Coast RV. It's about $15.

The floor on my boler feels solid now... I'd used it successfully on an old wooden row boat that I fixed up when I was a kid.. The transom was rotted along the top few inches... I applied git rot and after the boat was done, it held up to a 4hp evinrude bolted to the transom.
I have done exactly this procedure on both Trill's I have had and it works wonders.
I also used the epoxy to rebuild the door frame area.
I also found that when I went to a commercial glue sales company or body shop supply house,that I could buy a gallon of the two part mixture for less than the price of a pint or so at retail.

I also get my Butyl rubber this way and stainless screws and other hardware.

Look into it,it is worth the effort.

Ed
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