Gas Lines - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-15-2010, 12:21 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Vicki A.'s Avatar
 
Name: Vicki
Trailer: 2014 Escape 5.0 TA
Texas
Posts: 157
I am at the point of replacing the lines coming into the trailer to the stove and fridge. While at the "depot", I saw flexible lines used in homes for ranges, water heaters, etc. Does anyone know if that would work in the egg?
Sure would be a lot easier than trying to bend the copper, flaring and all.
Tell what ya'll think!!
__________________

__________________
Vicki A. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2010, 04:21 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Joe MacDonald's Avatar
 
Trailer: Trillium
Ontario
Posts: 754
short and sweet: No!!!
__________________

__________________
Joe MacDonald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2010, 07:09 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Trailer: 2008 Oliver Legacy Elite
Florida
Posts: 878
Registry
Joe, I'm really curious as to the quick... NO! ?
In my restaurant, all the fittings to gas equipment ran from the fixed pipes on the entry wall to the grill, stoves, fryers, etc., with extremely heavy duty, at least semi flexible gas hose (blue, I think, in color). This allowed the equipment to be pulled away from the walls for cleaning daily. Each piece on the line was fitted with a quick disconnect, and there was a central shutoff for the entire line, and also for the whole kitchen.
If that met code, in a situation with hundreds of people allowed in the building, under the license, why wouldn't it meet code in a trailer?
I claim absolutely no expertise in gas fittings and lines, and therefore always hire an expert. However, I'm curious. It would seem that a flexible line in a vehicle that, well.... flexes... would make some sense. For example, I suspect that the big coaches with slideout kitchens must have flexhose gas connections, wouldn't they? How else could a kitchen "slide"?

Not saying that Home Depot gear is the answer...

Sherry

__________________
SherryNPaul is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2010, 08:01 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Dave Bese's Avatar
 
Name: Dave
Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact Jr; 1972 Astro (Havasu?)
Washington
Posts: 196
RVIA specifies that the main run is black iron pipe with connection to appliances with short runs of flexible copper. Main run is to be under chassis with only connecting line thru the floor.
__________________
Dave Bese is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2010, 08:09 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Trailer: 2007 Eggcamper
Posts: 155
Quote:
Joe, I'm really curious as to the quick... NO! ?
In my restaurant, all the fittings to gas equipment ran from the fixed pipes on the entry wall to the grill, stoves, fryers, etc., with extremely heavy duty, at least semi flexible gas hose (blue, I think, in color). This allowed the equipment to be pulled away from the walls for cleaning daily. Each piece on the line was fitted with a quick disconnect, and there was a central shutoff for the entire line, and also for the whole kitchen.
If that met code, in a situation with hundreds of people allowed in the building, under the license, why wouldn't it meet code in a trailer?
I claim absolutely no expertise in gas fittings and lines, and therefore always hire an expert. However, I'm curious. It would seem that a flexible line in a vehicle that, well.... flexes... would make some sense. For example, I suspect that the big coaches with slideout kitchens must have flexhose gas connections, wouldn't they? How else could a kitchen "slide"?

Not saying that Home Depot gear is the answer...

Sherry

Sherry,
The flexible gas lines used in restaurants is extra heavy duty and costs hundreds. Residential gas connectors are VERY thin walled and can not take any abuse. Would probably not be a good choice for a trailer. Ward Flex, Trac Pipe etc. are also very thin walled and I don't think a good choice for a trailer. I believe soft copper tubing is the best compromise for gas piping a trailer.

Art
__________________
artspe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2010, 08:34 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Trailer: 2008 Oliver Legacy Elite
Florida
Posts: 878
Registry
Art, I would absolutely agree that the gas connections in a restaurant are not only extremely heavy duty, but extremely expensive. I also doubt (as you'll see in my first response) that residential products would be suitable for a trailer moving down the road.

I am curious, if anyone has seen them, as to how the propane connections are made in the buses with kitchen slides. I would suspect this is an expensive, heavy duty product... and flexible.

Please don't take my comments earlier as a recommendation for using household products in an rv gas supply. I, too, think using residential products, designed for a stable environment, could be a serious, and dangerous, mistake in an rv.

Sherry

__________________
SherryNPaul is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2010, 08:50 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Donna D.'s Avatar
 
Name: Donna D
Trailer: Escape 5.0 TA, 2014
Oregon
Posts: 24,433
Interesting topic. Maybe this article is worth reading:
RVIA STANDARDS AND EDUCATION DEPARTMENT - RV Propane Systems

On edit: oooops I see to see the entire article costs $49.95, dang.
__________________
Donna D.
Ten Forward - 2014 Escape 5.0 TA
Double Yolk - 1988 16' Scamp Deluxe
Donna D. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2010, 09:45 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Dave Bese's Avatar
 
Name: Dave
Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact Jr; 1972 Astro (Havasu?)
Washington
Posts: 196
How many really, really smooth roads do you travel? Vibrations are not common to a restaurant (except in CA). Resudal propane in copper creates hydrogen sulphide (poison); so the length of copper should be as short as possible. As you would travel down the road, the flextube would do what it does . . .flex. This leads to work-hardening, which makes the metal hard and subject then to cracks
__________________
Dave Bese is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2010, 11:20 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Trailer: 2008 Oliver Legacy Elite
Florida
Posts: 878
Registry
Dave. I think we all got that. Most of us here like the "road less traveled", even if it includes vibrations, bumps, and detours...

I should probably have included in my original post the pricetag of the flexible gas hoses in restaurants... fifty to one hundred a foot...but they're much larger diameter hoses than anyone would use in an rv,.

Obviously, even paying for expert installation, copper is cheaper, and considered "flexible" by RVIA code, because of the soft nature of copper (this benefit being also a problem, because you have to make sure there are no sharps nearby... as in screws, hangers, clips, nails, etc. that could abrade and puncture the line), and is recommended for the shortest run possible.... just to connect the gas-consuming equipment.

I'm afraid I kind of hijacked the original op's question,(and I apologize to her) wondering how the big buses connected the equipment in kitchen slideouts. If I had to guess, they use a marine grade braided stainless lp flexible tubing (also very expensive), as has been used for decades in boats. Perhaps, someday, this will be reasonably available in the rv market. Till then, I think copper is probably the standard in trailers, in the shortest run possible, with expert installation to prevent safety issues.

Again, I am NOT advocating residential flex tubing in a trailer. I, too, would consider that a serious safety hazard.

Yikes!

Your answers gave good background, and were very helpful, in assisting the op in making a good decision in what to do in her trailer, and I thank you for that.
Sherry
__________________
SherryNPaul is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2010, 07:15 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Joe MacDonald's Avatar
 
Trailer: Trillium
Ontario
Posts: 754
looks like every one jumped in before I got to reply, they seemed to have covered all the points I was considering.

Joe
__________________
Joe MacDonald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2010, 08:25 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
Vicki A.'s Avatar
 
Name: Vicki
Trailer: 2014 Escape 5.0 TA
Texas
Posts: 157
Well.... I guess I got my answer !
Actually, I understand the answer is NO NO NO!

Sherry - don't worry about the "hijack" - this was an interesting dialog.

Thanks to everyone for the interaction- this is obviouisly a very passionate subject - due to SAFETY precautions, and we all want to stay safe.

Vicki
__________________
Vicki A. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2010, 10:27 AM   #12
Member
 
Mike Bromley's Avatar
 
Trailer: 1973 Boler 1300 (Glass-Fab
Posts: 96
Registry
Quote:
[Residual] propane in copper creates hydrogen sulphide (poison);
I'm interested to know more about how Propane (C<sub>3</sub>H<sub>10</sub>) and copper (Cu) can make hydrogen sulphide (H<sub>2</sub>S). Is there some residual sulphur from the smelting process or some not refined out of the propane? That sounds not right from a chemistry standpoint.
__________________
Mike Bromley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2010, 11:32 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
Dave Bese's Avatar
 
Name: Dave
Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact Jr; 1972 Astro (Havasu?)
Washington
Posts: 196
Ever see the blue or green oxidation of copper? Sulfides of copper. We cannot get inside the tube to clean so it will, over time accumulate.
__________________
Dave Bese is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2010, 11:57 AM   #14
Member
 
Don'n'Deb's Avatar
 
Name: Donald & Debra
Trailer: Compact Jr 'RV There Yet'
Texas
Posts: 93
Registry
Quote:
Well.... I guess I got my answer !
Actually, I understand the answer is NO NO NO!

Sherry - don't worry about the "hijack" - this was an interesting dialog.

Thanks to everyone for the interaction- this is obviouisly a very passionate subject - due to SAFETY precautions, and we all want to stay safe.

Vicki
I used hose from Lowe's (intended to hook outdoor BBQ to NG) to replace to copper tube (wife recycled) in my Compact JR . Works just fine.
__________________

__________________
RV There yet??
Don'n'Deb is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
propane


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
gas lines,replacement,etc Rick Harmer Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 7 07-10-2016 06:27 AM
Water lines Lainey Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 0 07-09-2008 02:34 PM
Burro gas lines Ian-Vicki Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 24 11-10-2007 07:12 PM
Propane lines Jim Hovind Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 3 01-09-2006 08:30 AM
Propane lines General Chat 0 12-31-1969 07:00 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:08 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.