High Amp Hour batteries - Fiberglass RV


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Old 06-18-2018, 10:12 AM   #1
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High Amp Hour batteries

I have a two 6volt series battery system in my Escape. The batteries are rated at 225 Amp hrs. Since they are in series, the system rating is still 225 Amp hrs.

I've always preferred a two 12volt batteries system because if one battery dies out in the boonies there's still 12 volts available to run critical things.
So far the max rating on a deep cycle, group 24 battery I've found is 100 Amp hrs. Since they would be in parallel, that would give a system rating of only 200 Amp Hrs, compared to 225 for the 6 volt system, a pretty hefty penalty. Has anyone found a 12 volt deep cycle battery with a higher rating?

I don't really have room to upgrade to a larger battery group.

Walt
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Old 06-18-2018, 10:20 AM   #2
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Group 31s are a little bigger, both physically and in capacity, but not by a lot. Beyond that you have to go to golf cart batteries and such.

The only way to get more capacity with the same size case is to change chemistry, such as a lithium iron phosphate battery. They can discharge much further than lead acid without damage, and do many more cycles in their lifetime. On the flip side, initial cost is much higher, and you may have to invest in different chargers and battery management systems.

I'm sure there are threads about LiFePO4 batteries here.
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Old 06-18-2018, 11:27 AM   #3
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I strongly suggest you analysis your power wants and needs before spending a lot of time and money.

I did and now have a very efficient system. All lights are LED very little current. Furnace draws around 3 amps while running. Battery is a standard 74 amphour marine battery. No other power requirements.
Week-end camping in the summer 5 days (that's long week-end) before I need to recharge. Winter time 4 days unless it gets really cold.



Analysis.
LED lights --- every light on (rarely happen) 1.5 amp
Furnace -----when running 3 amp


Time of use =

Lights about 2 hours with only about .04 amps = .08amp hours
Furnace about 20 Minutes per day = .9 amp hours.
Total daily usage = almost 1 amphour

Battery available = 34 amphours.


Under the above usage I should be able to go about a month without recharging. However there's a couple of things that are not taken into consideration like Propane detector .034amphours = daily 0.816 amp hours Which brings it down to about 15 days.



By recharging every 4 to 6 days it takes a lot less time to recharge to full.

My solar system charges at about 4 amps, to replenish the battery about 4 days would be about 2 hours. (4 days = 8 amp hours of use). Six days would take another hour.



To me that's a pretty robust system. I really suggest you do the math before investing in large battery banks and big solar systems.
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Old 06-18-2018, 11:38 AM   #4
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running 2 6V lead acid batteries in series is superior to 2 12V in parallel, as they wear evenly since all the current, both load and charge, runs through all the cells. parallel batteries, one is inevitably slightly stronger than the other, and will become increasing unbalanced as they age. 6 large cells is superior to 12 smaller cells. those golf cart batteries are designed for true deep cycle use, while those marine/rv batteries are more starter batteries than deep cycle, regardless of any marketing claims.
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Old 06-18-2018, 12:36 PM   #5
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Byron
You are addressing a very different camping style than I outlined at the beginning. Yes, I'm aware of all that, but I prefer my creature comforts, limited though they may be.

John
I'm fully aware of all that, but I already stated my reason for preferring 2 12s. Every system has its benefits and drawbacks. Specifically if one of the 6s goes bad your trip is instantly over, not to mention loss of any food in the fridge. Not so with 12s. And unlike with 12s, finding a satisfactory replacement for a 6 is problematic in many places.

In Southern Utah for the past month, loss of a 12 would have been a manageable inconvenience. Loss of a 6 might have been a major disruption.

And Steve
Going to form 31s would be too disruptive physically. And LiPo are interesting but not proven ready for prime time in my opinion, not to mention the cost.

Thanks all.
Seems like 100 Amp hrs is a practical limit on form 24 12s.

Walt
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Old 06-18-2018, 12:45 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John in Santa Cruz View Post
running 2 6V lead acid batteries in series is superior to 2 12V in parallel, as they wear evenly since all the current, both load and charge, runs through all the cells. parallel batteries, one is inevitably slightly stronger than the other, and will become increasing unbalanced as they age. 6 large cells is superior to 12 smaller cells. those golf cart batteries are designed for true deep cycle use, while those marine/rv batteries are more starter batteries than deep cycle, regardless of any marketing claims.
I bought 12 volt deep cycle batteries designed for Solar Power installations rather than RV/Marine since they are designed for true deep cycle use.
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Old 06-18-2018, 01:32 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Alex Adams View Post
I bought 12 volt deep cycle batteries designed for Solar Power installations rather than RV/Marine since they are designed for true deep cycle use.
Got a link for them?
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Old 06-18-2018, 01:35 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WaltP View Post
Byron
You are addressing a very different camping style than I outlined at the beginning. Yes, I'm aware of all that, but I prefer my creature comforts, limited though they may be.

John
I'm fully aware of all that, but I already stated my reason for preferring 2 12s. Every system has its benefits and drawbacks. Specifically if one of the 6s goes bad your trip is instantly over, not to mention loss of any food in the fridge. Not so with 12s. And unlike with 12s, finding a satisfactory replacement for a 6 is problematic in many places.

In Southern Utah for the past month, loss of a 12 would have been a manageable inconvenience. Loss of a 6 might have been a major disruption.

And Steve
Going to form 31s would be too disruptive physically. And LiPo are interesting but not proven ready for prime time in my opinion, not to mention the cost.

Thanks all.
Seems like 100 Amp hrs is a practical limit on form 24 12s.

Walt



"Different Camping Styles" shouldn't change the fact that an analysis needs to be done. However if one is of opinion that bigger and more are better than go ahead and spend your money. It helps the economy.
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Old 06-18-2018, 01:40 PM   #9
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Here is the link:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

The company treated me very well. The first battery I ordered came with one of the posts damaged (deformed). They sent a new one immediately. I asked what to do with the old one and they said to dispose it properly. I managed to reshape the post enough that I can use it and the new one.

They seem to hold a charge really well and since they are AGM, they can be mounted in almost any position.
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Old 06-18-2018, 01:51 PM   #10
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...batteries in series like each other MUCH better than batts in parallel....
...batteries in parallel are constantly discharging/cannibalizing each other when in storage...not so much while in use or under charge...
...batteries in series add the voltage while amperage stays the same....
...batteries in parallel add the amperage while voltage stays the same....
...Trojan sells some of the best RV batts on the road, the Trojan 1245 is rated 150ah @ 12vdc , giving you 300 ah and 2, 12 volt batts...I like the idea of 2 12's, in case one goes belly up on a trip, you still have a 12vdc batt left. BUT, realistically, how often would this happen(I know it does actually happen). While 2, 6vdc batts would probably live longer, how much longer would be the question...personally, I like the idea of 2, brand new, bought at same time, Trojan 1245's with battery cutoffs(on both) for when not under charge and in storage.............
madjack

p.s. COSTS...you can buy a straight up replacement batt for under 100bux Vs 2r3X the amount(or more)...this is not a good batt for regularly boondocking but, would be great and (relatively) cheap for all other uses..........mj
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Old 06-20-2018, 06:29 AM   #11
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I do not have an answer, but have pondered the same issues myself at length. In the end I just went with the 2-6V and have been happy for several years now. I check the water and try and keep them above a 50% discharge and they appear to be doing fine. These were just cheap ($80ish) golf cart batteries sourced locally to get me camping. When these go I hope I have time to track down and purchase some better quality (Trojan) batteries for replacements. If my ship comes in I would love to have a couple of the Lithium batteries but that is probably not going to happen. As to the being with out power issue, worst case I do have the Honda (yes I know even mentioning that will bring out the haters).
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Old 06-20-2018, 06:59 AM   #12
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Maybe check that the battery compartment/ wiring is able to accommodate one readily available 12V in an emergency. The advantages of two 6V golf cart batteries are well documented, I'd be pleased if my Casita had room for that setup in the cave.
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Old 06-21-2018, 06:57 AM   #13
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6 volt vs. 12v

I have been boondocking several months per year for 10 years. My two 6-volt golf cart batteries have never suffered a quick death. Even with one dead cell the system worked well enough until I could replace the batteries. I use 260 amp hour batteries. Same footprint as the standard, just a bit taller. I recently switched from Trojan to Crown as Trojan costs half again as much. So far so good.
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Old 06-21-2018, 08:45 AM   #14
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Two 6 volt 225 AH and one 12 volt 100 AH in the hitch box all charged with 4, 100 watt flexible panels and a 1500 watt sine wave inverter create a wonderful boon dox
trailer. Hot coffee, microwave dinner watching my 32" TV playing "Phantom of the
Opera" from my Blu-ray DVD in surround sound while sipping a fine pinot noir make my golden years ring with joy..
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