High Voltage at Campground - Challenge - Fiberglass RV


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Old 10-11-2017, 08:47 AM   #1
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High Voltage at Campground - Challenge

Hi All,

Laura and I have been out camping about 9 times this year for a total of nearly 45 nights. We have probably been to approximately 10 campgrounds. We have had the following electrical problem at two campgrounds.

We have an onboard surge protector that is hard wired into our Casita that includes an LED display to monitor vital electrical information. Our surge protector is a Progressive 30 amp Electrical Management System with Smart Surge (Model: EMS-HW 30C). It will also display one of approximately 8 to 10 error codes if there is a detected problem. One of the error codes, "PE3", indicates that high voltage was detected. It is programmed to cut electrical power if the voltage exceeds 10% over or under 120 volts. In other words, it will run normally if the detected voltage is between 108 and 132 volts, but it will cut electrical power to the Casita if the detected voltage is outside of this range. Once the voltage is back within range, the Progressive EMS will allow electrical power to resume. VERY NICE! However. . .

For the second time this season, we were at a campground where the voltage would routinely hit 133 to 134 volts, thus our Progressive surge protector would cut the electrical power. This happened the most in the middle of the night and very early morning. Sometimes it would stay at 133 or 134 volts for a couple of hours, which means that I had no 120V power (no coffee, no AC, no Heat from the space heater, etc.). At other times it would cycle from 132 to 134 volts, thus the power would go on and off a dozen times in 1 hour. As a result, rather than using the 30 amp electric to power our fridge and water heater, we just used propane. At the very least, annoying.

Have others struggled with campgrounds with voltage issues above or below recommended ranges? I was wondering if there was some type of device that could regulate (decrease) voltage by a specified amount (1% to 10%, for example). If I could have cut the voltage by only a volt or two, I would have been just fine. Fortunately, we did not need to run our AC much due to it being fall camping and we used our 12v Fantastic Fan. I don't have a propane furnace, only a cube heater. If I would have really needed heat or AC, we would have been out of luck.

How have others dealt with this?

Thanks,

Dean
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Old 10-11-2017, 09:14 AM   #2
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This is probably what you are looking for:

30 Amp RV Voltage Regulator - TRC 10176 - Surge Protectors - Camping World

There is also a 50 amp version.
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Old 10-11-2017, 10:05 AM   #3
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Name: Pat
Trailer: Escape 2013 19 ft
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Originally Posted by DeanCHS1980 View Post
Hi All,

Laura and I have been out camping about 9 times this year for a total of nearly 45 nights. We have probably been to approximately 10 campgrounds. We have had the following electrical problem at two campgrounds.

We have an onboard surge protector that is hard wired into our Casita that includes an LED display to monitor vital electrical information. Our surge protector is a Progressive 30 amp Electrical Management System with Smart Surge (Model: EMS-HW 30C). It will also display one of approximately 8 to 10 error codes if there is a detected problem. One of the error codes, "PE3", indicates that high voltage was detected. It is programmed to cut electrical power if the voltage exceeds 10% over or under 120 volts. In other words, it will run normally if the detected voltage is between 108 and 132 volts, but it will cut electrical power to the Casita if the detected voltage is outside of this range. Once the voltage is back within range, the Progressive EMS will allow electrical power to resume. VERY NICE! However. . .

For the second time this season, we were at a campground where the voltage would routinely hit 133 to 134 volts, thus our Progressive surge protector would cut the electrical power. This happened the most in the middle of the night and very early morning. Sometimes it would stay at 133 or 134 volts for a couple of hours, which means that I had no 120V power (no coffee, no AC, no Heat from the space heater, etc.). At other times it would cycle from 132 to 134 volts, thus the power would go on and off a dozen times in 1 hour. As a result, rather than using the 30 amp electric to power our fridge and water heater, we just used propane. At the very least, annoying.

Have others struggled with campgrounds with voltage issues above or below recommended ranges? I was wondering if there was some type of device that could regulate (decrease) voltage by a specified amount (1% to 10%, for example). If I could have cut the voltage by only a volt or two, I would have been just fine. Fortunately, we did not need to run our AC much due to it being fall camping and we used our 12v Fantastic Fan. I don't have a propane furnace, only a cube heater. If I would have really needed heat or AC, we would have been out of luck.

How have others dealt with this?

Thanks,

Dean
We have the same surge protector on our trailer . This summer at a casino campground and our power was shut down on the trailer . The error code said it was because of the ground on The pedestal . After 2 hours used the by pass on the remote and we got power back to trailer . I went to office and complained because I wasn't comfortable to not have the surge in our system . Maintennce came to my trailer and had me change the bypass back to on . Everything electrical worked . Good thing because it was hot and we needed the AC . The rest of the trip at other campgrounds had no problem . We are just never going back to this Casino campground .There are times the campground power have issues with their wiring . Pat
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Old 10-11-2017, 10:37 AM   #4
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agree

my neighbor had the same issue hot to ground it ruined some of his electronics I know for sure it took out his converter.

scarey stuff I don't think they ever paid him for it either!

bob
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Old 10-11-2017, 11:02 AM   #5
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A fail proof way to prevent these problems. Learn to live without electricity in your trailer. It can be done, I'm proof. I don't ever plug in except when the trailer is parked next to my house, then it's only used to run the fridge. Electronic toys are not present in the trailer, those I carry are recharged with "car chargers".
I often wonder how many would survive without electricity. Ask yourself what are you going to do when the electricity grid fails. NOTE I said "when" not "if".
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Old 10-11-2017, 11:09 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by k0wtz View Post
my neighbor had the same issue hot to ground it ruined some of his electronics I know for sure it took out his converter.

scarey stuff I don't think they ever paid him for it either!

bob
I hope none of our electronics are damaged . They brought a external surge , one used for Class A's and then were trying to tell us surge's aren't recommended by them and cause problems . They then had me turn bypass back on and everything was working they never had to give me their external surge to use) I am not the smartest about electrical and was confused because we got that error code and our electrical would not work . I just will not be going back . That Casino is in Jackson , California. Pat
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Old 10-11-2017, 11:29 AM   #7
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A fail proof way to prevent these problems. Learn to live without electricity in your trailer. It can be done, I'm proof. I don't ever plug in except when the trailer is parked next to my house, then it's only used to run the fridge. Electronic toys are not present in the trailer, those I carry are recharged with "car chargers".
I often wonder how many would survive without electricity. Ask yourself what are you going to do when the electricity grid fails. NOTE I said "when" not "if".

If you have brake lights, interior lights or a CO detector, you are not living without electricity. I like being out in the wild and away from everything modern too, but I also like to write and study in a an environment that is quiet and with different scenery. I see nothing at all wrong with using my computer or checking in with my daughter, while out camping. I'll even watch a favorite movie on occasion and sometimes I (gasp!) turn on an electric light or let my water pump deliver water to the faucet!

Camping, for me, is not practicing for when the "grid fails". It's having fun and being out in the wild where there are lots of new things to see, quiet to experience and a chance to clear my mind of the daily routine. I can easily go for days without power when out in the wild, months with solar, but it's nice to have it too.

Part of doing that is figuring out how to manage all of the systems I want to enjoy. One way to avoid the high voltage problem is to use solar to charge the batteries and a small inverter to charge the toys. I suspect that high voltage is most likely a result of getting power from a generator at some locations, rather than from the grid. If this is true, the generator might be a temporary thing and the voltage could return to normal levels later. Or, at least you'll know not to plug in at that site.

Mexico is famous for having high voltage. It's not an accident, it's a deliberate thing. When I was there on my boat, I'd measure the voltage and watch it at high use periods. I could see it come down when too many people were on the same circuit and I'd charge my batteries during that period. Then when usage went down and the voltage went back up, my charger would kick out and I'd wait for the next cycle. Worked out just fine.
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Old 10-11-2017, 11:57 AM   #8
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The ole surge protector dilemma.
I have 6 RV campsites for the gas and oil workers. Over the past three years, I have had 2 campers with these surge protectors and both had trip problems at around 133 134 volts and mainly in the evenings. I had the power company check everything out and all was ok on their end and had the sites checked and all was good there as well. In my travels, I have had a lot of folks tell e that they have had problems with these things tripping. None of the campers that I have had have had any issues with their electronics with this slight short-term jump in voltage. The last camper that had trip problems decided to quit using it and he is still here after 4 months without it. It seemed like the problem was mainly during hot weather. I guess it's a "use your own judgment " thing.
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Old 10-11-2017, 12:08 PM   #9
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I don't understand how you could have 134 volts that is a big variation not running your el. down. There seems to be a regulation problem I would say you big transformer is going bad it does happen.


did they ever tell you why this was happening? I am very interested.


bob
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Old 10-11-2017, 12:25 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raspy View Post
If you have brake lights, interior lights or a CO detector, you are not living without electricity. I like being out in the wild and away from everything modern too, but I also like to write and study in a an environment that is quiet and with different scenery. I see nothing at all wrong with using my computer or checking in with my daughter, while out camping. I'll even watch a favorite movie on occasion and sometimes I (gasp!) turn on an electric light or let my water pump deliver water to the faucet!

Camping, for me, is not practicing for when the "grid fails". It's having fun and being out in the wild where there are lots of new things to see, quiet to experience and a chance to clear my mind of the daily routine. I can easily go for days without power when out in the wild, months with solar, but it's nice to have it too.

Part of doing that is figuring out how to manage all of the systems I want to enjoy. One way to avoid the high voltage problem is to use solar to charge the batteries and a small inverter to charge the toys. I suspect that high voltage is most likely a result of getting power from a generator at some locations, rather than from the grid. If this is true, the generator might be a temporary thing and the voltage could return to normal levels later. Or, at least you'll know not to plug in at that site.

Mexico is famous for having high voltage. It's not an accident, it's a deliberate thing. When I was there on my boat, I'd measure the voltage and watch it at high use periods. I could see it come down when too many people were on the same circuit and I'd charge my batteries during that period. Then when usage went down and the voltage went back up, my charger would kick out and I'd wait for the next cycle. Worked out just fine.

Brake lights are powered from the tow vehicle. Yes I use battery power and recharge from the sun. I also have my toys, computer, cell phone, tablet, including a ham radio or two. I have gone for long periods of time without using them. And I don't rely on the power grid when camping. Our infra structure is very fragile. It doesn't take much to knock it out, not necessarily nation wide but more local. Within the past few years a backhoe operator knocked out power, cell, phone, and internet for almost a 100 mile stretch along the lower Columbia River.

Also I'm a retired electronic engineer and understand electricity and electronics. I know what can and does go wrong with the power grid system. I know what went wrong with power grid with the great NY black out and that it's been improved, but not fool proof.
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Old 10-11-2017, 01:11 PM   #11
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This probably happens in your home as well. The reason for the changes occur when the power company ups to voltage to cover a lot of usage, and then the usage goes away relatively fast, and they do not compensate fast enough. That is why it happens in the night or early morning, as those times have low usage relatively. If it is hot out, afternoon usage is very high, drawing the current down to the lower end, the power company ups to compensate, then the sun goes down, A/C shuts off, and voltage rises. It can also happen in an area where there is a large factory, which only works two shifts. When the factory shuts off machines, the substation that supplies power to that area may not make the adjustments fast enough, or they may make them early morning to get ready for the stuff to go back on line. You can complain to ComEd, Pacific Gas and Electric -- however is the power company in the area, but there is really nothing that can be done about it.
Protection is the best thing, and have electronics always behind surge, or UPS systems.
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Old 10-11-2017, 01:41 PM   #12
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Hey Dean. We had the same problem at a campground in Palm Springs Ca last winter. I complained at the office and they sent an electrician to our site. I watched as he confirmed the over voltage situation and blamed ConEd for the problem and switched the power to the other leg on the pedestal and checked it again saying "your good now at 109 volts". And I said of course you know I will error out at 108 so he said "you are good then". It wasn't 2 hours and it dropped below 108 and sure enough no power. We boondocked that night and left early the next day. Never camp at the Happy Traveler in Palm Springs CA
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Old 10-11-2017, 01:47 PM   #13
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Byron,
When I'm out camping in my trailer I am absolutely not fixated on the myriad of potential grid problems that might happen while I'm there. Since you have a well equipped trailer, you have already done all you can and are far ahead of the normal city dweller with respect to power.

BTW, your tow vehicle can also fail and cause you to lose power. Power that starts your car and powers your toys. Power that runs through wires to your tail lights and possibly your trailer battery. Your own personal grid. When I'm out camping, that is the area I concentrate on; my own personal grid and not some potential guy with a backhoe thousands of miles away.

In the end, it's just a matter of what we decide to focus on and worry about, not necessarily what the real dangers are. You make no mention of the fresh water systems, or natural gas systems in cities, for instance. But just as much chaos can come from a water system or gas failure, as a power failure. And we do know as a matter of fact, that those systems fail. If you need a break from power worry, you could switch over to water for a while instead.

It's funny, but my only tie to any grid at home is the power grid and if it failed, for no matter how long, we would be just fine. Most of what we do is done with solar and the house is always comfortable. But either way, it's not high on my list of concerns and I didn't design it all just to be ready for a failure. If there is a widespread failure, the last thing I'll be worried about is how to cope without electricity, as it will be the societal chaos that brings the damage.
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Old 10-11-2017, 02:36 PM   #14
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Have never had that experience in 20 years of camping.
We carry a little gadget that you plug in to see if the campground wiring is OK, no bad grounds, or such.
I guess I have always trusted the voltage to be within spec.

You can compare an electrical circuit to a water system.
Voltage = Pressure, and Amperage = Flow.
When there is no flow (all the taps are closed) pressure is at the highest,
When you open a tap, the pressure drops. and the pump (generator) has to crank up to try and maintain the pressure.
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Old 10-11-2017, 04:50 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by DeanCHS1980 View Post
Hi All,

Laura and I have been out camping about 9 times this year for a total of nearly 45 nights. We have probably been to approximately 10 campgrounds. We have had the following electrical problem at two campgrounds.

We have an onboard surge protector that is hard wired into our Casita that includes an LED display to monitor vital electrical information. Our surge protector is a Progressive 30 amp Electrical Management System with Smart Surge (Model: EMS-HW 30C). It will also display one of approximately 8 to 10 error codes if there is a detected problem. One of the error codes, "PE3", indicates that high voltage was detected. It is programmed to cut electrical power if the voltage exceeds 10% over or under 120 volts. In other words, it will run normally if the detected voltage is between 108 and 132 volts, but it will cut electrical power to the Casita if the detected voltage is outside of this range. Once the voltage is back within range, the Progressive EMS will allow electrical power to resume. VERY NICE! However. . .

For the second time this season, we were at a campground where the voltage would routinely hit 133 to 134 volts, thus our Progressive surge protector would cut the electrical power. This happened the most in the middle of the night and very early morning. Sometimes it would stay at 133 or 134 volts for a couple of hours, which means that I had no 120V power (no coffee, no AC, no Heat from the space heater, etc.). At other times it would cycle from 132 to 134 volts, thus the power would go on and off a dozen times in 1 hour. As a result, rather than using the 30 amp electric to power our fridge and water heater, we just used propane. At the very least, annoying.

Have others struggled with campgrounds with voltage issues above or below recommended ranges? I was wondering if there was some type of device that could regulate (decrease) voltage by a specified amount (1% to 10%, for example). If I could have cut the voltage by only a volt or two, I would have been just fine. Fortunately, we did not need to run our AC much due to it being fall camping and we used our 12v Fantastic Fan. I don't have a propane furnace, only a cube heater. If I would have really needed heat or AC, we would have been out of luck.

How have others dealt with this?

Thanks,

Dean
We have had low voltage in campgrounds. We have a monitor plugged in at all times and watch it. Before we ever plug in we test the post with a tester that shows if there's open, reversed or lack of ground. They are sold at Walmart, camping stores, etc for about $7. Usually yellow in color. Has saved us many times. It only fits a 15 amp plug in so we purchased a 30 amp connector with a 15 amp plug in to test the 30 amp circuit. Usually around $7-10. We have a surge protector also but don't plug it in until the post is tested. We have had to have posts fixed before we could plug in. When we show the campgrounds our equipment they don't doubt us for long. If the voltage is to low we have a power booster also. We've used this at home for our friends to use their 30 amp A/C on our 15 amp service. A little diligence will save you a lot of problems.
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Old 10-11-2017, 09:23 PM   #16
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We had the same thing happen. All of the pedestals in our area were testing a little too high and it was blamed on the power company. We moved to another loop and no such problem any more. Been at other loops at the same campground quite a few times and they were fine.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DeanCHS1980 View Post
Hi All,

Laura and I have been out camping about 9 times this year for a total of nearly 45 nights. We have probably been to approximately 10 campgrounds. We have had the following electrical problem at two campgrounds.

We have an onboard surge protector that is hard wired into our Casita that includes an LED display to monitor vital electrical information. Our surge protector is a Progressive 30 amp Electrical Management System with Smart Surge (Model: EMS-HW 30C). It will also display one of approximately 8 to 10 error codes if there is a detected problem. One of the error codes, "PE3", indicates that high voltage was detected. It is programmed to cut electrical power if the voltage exceeds 10% over or under 120 volts. In other words, it will run normally if the detected voltage is between 108 and 132 volts, but it will cut electrical power to the Casita if the detected voltage is outside of this range. Once the voltage is back within range, the Progressive EMS will allow electrical power to resume. VERY NICE! However. . .

For the second time this season, we were at a campground where the voltage would routinely hit 133 to 134 volts, thus our Progressive surge protector would cut the electrical power. This happened the most in the middle of the night and very early morning. Sometimes it would stay at 133 or 134 volts for a couple of hours, which means that I had no 120V power (no coffee, no AC, no Heat from the space heater, etc.). At other times it would cycle from 132 to 134 volts, thus the power would go on and off a dozen times in 1 hour. As a result, rather than using the 30 amp electric to power our fridge and water heater, we just used propane. At the very least, annoying.

Have others struggled with campgrounds with voltage issues above or below recommended ranges? I was wondering if there was some type of device that could regulate (decrease) voltage by a specified amount (1% to 10%, for example). If I could have cut the voltage by only a volt or two, I would have been just fine. Fortunately, we did not need to run our AC much due to it being fall camping and we used our 12v Fantastic Fan. I don't have a propane furnace, only a cube heater. If I would have really needed heat or AC, we would have been out of luck.

How have others dealt with this?

Thanks,

Dean
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Old 10-12-2017, 05:57 AM   #17
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The guy from the power co also recommended using surge protectors on each item individually instead of on the main. Easy to say hard to do. They can also be installed on the breakers individually.
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Old 10-12-2017, 06:20 AM   #18
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I have put together huge transmitters they all have excellant regulation I watch those meters closely because transmitter tubes must stay in regulation or they will burn up.


Same theory of regulation to your pole that big transformer up there is just for that! Huge voltage comes to the transformer is adjusted up there to bring down either 220 or 110 to your pole and meter.


This electricity is smoothed out up there and corrects amperage along the way down your line to your home. Check any outlet in your house with a voltmeter I have, too much variation such as too much voltage and you can kiss your eltronics good bye including things with motors in them like a fridge and such!


You had a right to be concerned and no I wouldn't camp there any more the electrician wasn't looking out for you!
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Old 10-12-2017, 06:39 AM   #19
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Could one of you with electric experience explain how voltage can end up so high? Are the transformers on the pole to blame? (If possible please use grade school terms that my aging brain and understand.)


Happy Autumn, john

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Old 10-12-2017, 06:53 AM   #20
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Thanks, guys. Now I have something else to worry about! Seriously, does anyone have a good suggestion for a moderately priced but effective surge protector? I'm not too worried about the automatic boosting or reducing capabilities, but I'd like to catch any low or high spikes. CAMCO has a 30 amp model for around $186 at eTrailer. Thoughts?
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