How quiet is the Dometic RM2193 Compact Refrigerator - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-23-2008, 10:06 AM   #15
Member
 
Laurie T's Avatar
 
Trailer: 17 ft Burro (Dance Hall Edition ''The Casbah'')
Posts: 75
Great info everyone. I appreciate it. Of course, I'm really concerned about finding someone skilled to do the installation since it requires ac, dc and propane hose connection not to mention the dreaded holes in our pristine camper body.

I really will have to chew on this before deciding.

I love that the dometic will be quiet even if it takes longer to get cold.

Has anyone installed a solar system with enough batteries to run their refrigeration off of 12 volt when boondocking or is that unrealistic?

Thanks,

Laurie
__________________

__________________
Laurie T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2008, 08:54 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
peterh's Avatar
 
Name: Peter
Trailer: 2005 19 ft Scamp 19 ft 5th Wheel
Oregon
Posts: 1,519
Registry
Quote:
So does this mean what I read was wrong? (It was in some sort of "choose your refrigerator wisely" type of entry on a website.)

To reiterate, what I had read was that any refrigerator that runs on propane (and therefore uses the ammonia/flame method to cool) would be much less efficient when in electrical mode than a dedicated electric refrigerator that used a (new, efficient) compressor.

I wonder if this is really true? It does make intuitive sense to me, but that doesn't always mean anything.
It means that a cheap dorm refrigerator pulls down 152 watts when the compressor motor is running, which is only part of the time. A propane/12v fridge, on the other hand, will pull down up to 113 watts all the time. Because the compressor motor only runs a small fraction of the time compressor refrigerators are more efficient.

The problem is, whether you're looking at 152 watts or 113 watts, that's a lot of electricity. That power draw will empty most deep cycle batteries in a few short hours. That makes using either of these two electric options a very poor choice for dry-camping.

One advantage propane powered refrigerators have is there's a lot of energy stored in a pound of propane, enough to keep a 'fridge cold for several days. That's why the refrigerators our trailers come with run on propane. If you plan on camping for a week at a time without re-stocking, a propane fridge is the way to go.

There's another source of cold that's also very efficient: ice. It takes a huge amount of heat to melt ice, which is why it can take days for the ice in an ice-box to melt. Buying or freezing a block of ice might be inconvenient, but it's cheap and dependable. By packing a combination of already-cold foods and frozen goods that you plan on using a few days into your camping trip, plus a couple of frozen one- or two-liter bottles of water and your ice-box can easily keep your food cold for three or four days.

There is one other option. There are 12v compressor refrigerators that consume an average of 1.5 amps (18 watts) or so of electricity per hour. That's still a big number, enough to empty most deep-cycle batteries in a day and a half, but it does mean that you can use a (noisy, smelly, heavy, expensive environmentally unfriendly, do you get the idea I don't like this suggestion) generator to charge your battery every morning and evening and keep your food cold.
__________________

__________________
peterh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2008, 10:07 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Name: Darwin
Trailer: 2002 19 ft Scamp 19 ft 5th Wheel
Posts: 3,030
Send a message via Yahoo to Darwin Maring
Some of the new camping coolers say they will keep stuff cold for 5 days. I purchased a large one at Costco that has a door in the lid so we can open the door to get out sodas and not have to open the whole lid. We freeze gallon milk bottles (Water) and put the cooler in the bed of the truck. We put other items in the cooler when there is not enough room in the fridge and move a frozen milk jug to the fridge if required.

As far as the fridge running all the time, our's has a thermostat so I have to suspect it just runs most of the time, not all the time.
__________________
Darwin Maring is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2008, 12:18 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
Harry Young's Avatar
 
Trailer: 1971 Astro (ie. Campster/Hunter I)
Posts: 437
Send a message via MSN to Harry Young Send a message via Yahoo to Harry Young
Post

Your going to vent the refrigerator any way you go...Even conventional refrigerators need a place to put the surplus heat you are removing from inside the box...The venting even in a Burro is simple its the cabinet work which requires some basic skills that might shine through a little...The solar solution is viable daytime with sun when present and 2 100 watt panels...However you must produce enough daytime energy to store for night time use which requires multiple batteries, charge controllers, and the solar panels...Fear not the propane 2 way refrigerator. When we are traveling I use my 110v inverter to power the cold box on desert crossings of 5 hours or more, I always pre-cool a day before the trip and I let the tug keep the battery up while it purrs along down the road chilling its little heart out. The old boxes were a bit of a pain and legends of their problems still echo on the boards...The new boxes are far more tolerant of angles and forgiving of the blustery windy days, they are best described as steady, predictable and forgiving now. As a service person the Norcold brand is a bit better at running off level and the Dometic but that brand is a champ in the parts department.

The prior comment on the R.M.S. calculation is bang on...There is a difference and I would go gas/110v...For all my buds out there if you have a 110v and really want a 12v the elements usually switch out.

The new 12v compressor models starting to filter into the U.S.A. are good too, but there is that whole power situation again to deal with...I go into the rougher areas and stay weeks when I do go camping and the gas/110v is unbeatable...Mine nicely makes my ice cubes and keeps the wine perfect.

Just thought I would weigh in.

Harry

Quote:
Great info everyone. I appreciate it. Of course, I'm really concerned about finding someone skilled to do the installation since it requires ac, dc and propane hose connection not to mention the dreaded holes in our pristine camper body.

I really will have to chew on this before deciding.

I love that the dometic will be quiet even if it takes longer to get cold.

Has anyone installed a solar system with enough batteries to run their refrigeration off of 12 volt when boondocking or is that unrealistic?

Thanks,

Laurie
__________________
Harry Young is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2008, 01:29 PM   #19
Member
 
Laurie T's Avatar
 
Trailer: 17 ft Burro (Dance Hall Edition ''The Casbah'')
Posts: 75

Harry what brand refrigerator do you have and model?

And what would make a 12v compressor refrigerator smelly? I certainly don't want noisy and smelly would be even worse. Though the 1.8 amp an hour could be doable with a good solar system.

Ice is sounding better and better the more everyone shares.

Thanx everybody!!

Warmly,

Laurie
__________________
Laurie T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2008, 02:51 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Scott S.'s Avatar
 
Name: Scott
Trailer: 1975 Surfside TM14 (front kitchen)
Manitoba
Posts: 515
Registry
Send a message via MSN to Scott S. Send a message via Yahoo to Scott S.
I only run on gas... and usually load everything I can into the fridge cold or even frozen so it's not working too hard when I first start it up. I still use a cooler for the beer though.


__________________
Scott S. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2008, 09:33 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
peterh's Avatar
 
Name: Peter
Trailer: 2005 19 ft Scamp 19 ft 5th Wheel
Oregon
Posts: 1,519
Registry
Quote:
And what would make a 12v compressor refrigerator smelly? I certainly don't want noisy and smelly would be even worse. Though the 1.8 amp an hour could be doable with a good solar system.
You'd need a pair of deep cycle batteries and a 75-100 watt solar panel array with clear shot at the sky to power a 12v, 1.5 amp appliance 7x24.

(18 watts usage x 24 hours) / (6 hours productive sunlight) = 72 watts panel required

--Peter
__________________
peterh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2008, 10:12 PM   #22
Senior Member
 
Raya's Avatar
 
Name: Rachel
Trailer: 1974 Boler 13 ft (Neonex/Winnipeg)
Posts: 3,014
Quote:
And what would make a 12v compressor refrigerator smelly? I certainly don't want noisy and smelly would be even worse.
What gives you the idea that it would be smelly?

When Peter referred to noise and smell he was talking about a generator (if you used one, theoretically, to power an electric refrigerator). Granted, a compressor electric refrigerator would make some noise, but not a lot.

Venting on all of the refrigerators is for heat, mainly, not odors.

R.
__________________
Raya is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2008, 12:12 PM   #23
Member
 
Laurie T's Avatar
 
Trailer: 17 ft Burro (Dance Hall Edition ''The Casbah'')
Posts: 75
Quote:
What gives you the idea that it would be smelly?

When Peter referred to noise and smell he was talking about a generator (if you used one, theoretically, to power an electric refrigerator). Granted, a compressor electric refrigerator would make some noise, but not a lot.

Venting on all of the refrigerators is for heat, mainly, not odors.

R.
Ahh, thanks for clearing that up for me, I didn't realize he was talking about the generator. I also appreciate the break down of what would be needed as a solar array and battery power to add the refrigerator. It does appeal to me to be able to be able to have a fossil free refrigerator when boondocking.

Can anyone share with me the model and type of the refrigerator they are using and how noisy it is and if they noise is continuous or intermittent with the cycling of the refrigerator.

Thanks so much!

Warmly,

Laurie
__________________
Laurie T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2008, 09:11 PM   #24
Senior Member
 
peterh's Avatar
 
Name: Peter
Trailer: 2005 19 ft Scamp 19 ft 5th Wheel
Oregon
Posts: 1,519
Registry
Quote:
Ahh, thanks for clearing that up for me, I didn't realize he was talking about the generator. I also appreciate the break down of what would be needed as a solar array and battery power to add the refrigerator. It does appeal to me to be able to be able to have a fossil free refrigerator when boondocking.

Can anyone share with me the model and type of the refrigerator they are using and how noisy it is and if they noise is continuous or intermittent with the cycling of the refrigerator.

Thanks so much!

Warmly,

Laurie
Just keep in mind that my calculation for solar panels only took the one 1.5 amp/hour refrigerator into account and requires, and nothing else. Most people also want to run their lights and heater, and for that you'd need more solar panels. Also remember that the solar panels be parked in a location that's open to the sunny sky. A well-treed park would present problems for running on solar. Camping during the fall or winter seasons would create a problem, too.
__________________
peterh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2008, 09:42 PM   #25
Moderator
 
Gina D.'s Avatar
 
Name: Gina D.
Trailer: '77 Leocraft 17 & Former Burro owner and fan!
West Coast USA
Posts: 9,016
Registry
unscientific general answer:

I have the next model up (With a small freezer)

No noise at all on gas or DC, and nothing noticeable on AC. My own breathing is louder.
__________________
Gina D. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2008, 10:46 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
Harry Young's Avatar
 
Trailer: 1971 Astro (ie. Campster/Hunter I)
Posts: 437
Send a message via MSN to Harry Young Send a message via Yahoo to Harry Young
Post

I am using a Dometic RM 2451...I use it in the electric mode when traveling via an Inverter if I am on the move more than 5 hours, its silent and frugal on propane when camping, the propane which I have on board for the stoves and furnace seemed the logical choice for me.
When you install any of these boxes or the ice only ice boxes I suggest to line the cabinet it will slip into with a foil backed reflective insulation...it can make a huge difference in refrigerator cycle times (solar) or ice survival and the temp of the contents in the box will benefit...there is two kinds of heat basically in this type of mechanical refrigeration...sensible and insensible heats...the first is managed by a mechanical/chemical process the second must be best handled by reflecting it mostly.

Here is a way of understanding it...your driving on a hot day, the windows are up and the A/C is blasting...the car is actually cold but as your car changes orientation to the sun your arm has sunlight hit it and it becomes hot...now the air in the cabin is still cold...but the arm is still hot?...the heat striking your arm is infrared...as this insensible heat enters the cabin it will not raise the temp of the air but when it strikes a solid target like your arm that target goes up in temp and then the target can raise the temp of the air contacting it so the cabin gets hot.

For this reason fancy tinted windows really work, the tint reflects infrared (insensible heat) away from the cabin before it can enter. Fiberglass trailers are plastic, the outer colored shell (gel coat) is 20 to 50 mils thick on average, about as thick as a garbage bags plastic...the rest of the skin is spun glass and semi clear resin, (plastic) infrared penetrates this type of structure really well...in the case of the ice box it will come through and penetrate an unreflective ice box and warm the food quickly most ice boxes are white styrofoam and plastic liners...no foils are used...refrigerated boxes generally come with the outer reflectex card (foil) board and is already installed at the factory...the ice boxes do not give such considerations...you must add it if wise...your ice will last days longer in some sunny climates. If you do go with the solar concept the heat load can be reduced along with cycle times per hour needed (ergo demand) on the battery power required per solar day, at least it will be diminished R-Max board can super insulate a cold box and in a solar design I would make that a prime consideration.

Harry
__________________

__________________
Harry Young is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
refrigerator


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Dometic RM2193 question Raz Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 9 12-16-2014 06:26 PM
Dometic RV Refrigerator RM2193 Rob_C Classified Archives 5 02-25-2008 03:05 PM
New Dometic Refrigerator jrnutpaul Modifications, Alterations and Updates 7 07-03-2007 10:22 AM
HELP! - Dometic Refrigerator ID Help Dan I Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 4 07-31-2006 06:50 PM
Dometic Refrigerator - Pay for Shipping Only Bonnie Copeland Classified Archives 0 02-08-2006 01:57 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:30 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.