Infrared Thermometer on Sale - Page 3 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 12-12-2007, 01:56 PM   #29
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Your clock being several seconds or billionths of a second off will not matter because you will still get to your appointments on time, that is unless you are retired in which case It just doesn’t matter.
A clock for all of you retired people...


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Old 12-12-2007, 02:48 PM   #30
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To Brian B-P, You have a great since of humor, thanks, that is what I call a retired clock.
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For everyone: The least costly model in Northern Tools has the listed specs of 2.5% and the $600 model is listed at 1%. It did not state + or - percentage. If it is +- 2.5% then the range of error on the cheep one for 100 degrees would be from 97.5 to 102.5 degrees and that is something us camper people can live with.

I for one would take a static reading of the hub and wheel before starting and the reading should be relative the same and do it on my truck also and it still should be relative the same as the egg and I suspect it would be very close to the ambient temperature outside. Do the same thing when I stop to take a break and the readings should be relative the same when compared against each other.

As my truck has a thermometer in the rear view mirror it should be easy to use it to compare with the IRT to see if there is a wide margin of differences.

Even the most expensive device can malfunction so right now I'm going to trust their specifications. As far as 30 to 50 degrees I guess we'll just have to rely on our own brain power to figure out if something is wrong with the IR device.
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Old 12-12-2007, 02:56 PM   #31
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To Brian B-P, You have a great since of humor, thanks, that is what I call a retired clock.
------------------------------------------
For everyone: The least costly model in Northern Tools has the listed specs of 2.5% and the $600 model is listed at 1%. It did not state + or - percentage. If it is +- 2.5% then the range of error on the cheep one for 100 degrees would be from 97.5 to 102.5 degrees and that is something us camper people can live with.

I for one would take a static reading of the hub and wheel before starting and the reading should be relative the same and do it on my truck also and it still should be relative the same as the egg and I suspect it would be very close to the ambient temperature outside. Do the same thing when I stop to take a break and the readings should be relative the same when compared against each other.

As my truck has a thermometer in the rear view mirror it should be easy to use it to compare with the IRT to see if there is a wide margin of differences.

Even the most expensive device can malfunction so right now I'm going to trust their specifications. As far as 30 to 50 degrees I guess we'll just have to rely on our own brain power to figure out if something is wrong with the IR device.
Ahh, Over what ambient range does that specification apply to?
That's my point. They'll work at room temperature. The farther away from room temperature you get the larger the error.

Having dealt with marketing types on specifications ± any percentage is a cop-out. 2.5% of what. Since according you, they don't say it can be anything such as the maximum reading. Makes a big difference.
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Old 12-12-2007, 03:38 PM   #32
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I wasn't to sure about the usfulness of this heat reading device beyond checking axle bearings. But I think I've thought of more uses on everyday things around the house. 1, when I get a bowl of chili and start adding my tabasco sauce to it I just point and get a reading as to how hot it is. 2, when I take the cover off my old tube radio I just point this thing in at the wires to find out which one is hot. 3, When I come home late from the saloon and see my wife I just point this thing at her and see if she is hot. 4, when I go to the news stand I'll point his thing to see which paper is hot off the press. 5, If I ever see Paris hilton I'll point and see if she is really as hot as she claims to be. 6, When I go to the the think tank I can easily see if they have any hot ideas. 7, When I go to the kennel I'll check for hot dogs. 8, When I go to cabella's I'll see if they have any hot rods. And then this thing also does cold. 1, When I return from the saloon maybe I'll get the cold shoulder it sure is easy to check. 2, And if I could aim it at you folks reading this I may be getting a real cold stare. so I'm done. Jerry
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Old 12-12-2007, 08:06 PM   #33
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...And if I could aim it at you folks reading this I may be getting a real cold stare. so I'm done.
Not from me!
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Old 12-13-2007, 11:21 AM   #34
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Sometimes new technology is placed on the market before it's mature enough to be practical for most users. That's the case with IR thermometers (technically they are radiometers). Radiometers are quite useful in some applications. At this point in time there are limitations that most users are not aware of. I also firmly believe that most of those limitations will be gone in 3 to 5 years. We (meaning another engineer and myself) have created designs that overcome most those limitations. The design is not quite perfected enough for a general market device. It's getting there. My advice is to wait a couple years and let the technology catch up with the desire to have a practical instrument rather than purchasing an unreliable toy.
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Old 12-13-2007, 04:13 PM   #35
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If it wasn't for Edison, we would be watching TV by candle lite.
If it wasn't for Bessemer, we'd be driving around in cast iron automobiles.

I for one, I'm going to go out and put carbide lamps on the egg and tug.
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Old 12-13-2007, 04:22 PM   #36
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If it wasn't for Edison, we would be watching TV by candle lite.
If it wasn't for Bessemer, we'd be driving around in cast iron automobiles.

I for one, I'm going to go out and put carbide lamps on the egg and tug.
Art,

Please update your location and RV type.
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Old 12-16-2007, 09:48 PM   #37
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Brian, you can easily get the hub temps even with the covers on -- Either put your hand around blind on the back and squeeze the button OR shoot the opposite wheel from underneath! (Byron, before you jump on me, this last would be a case where one really doesn't care about 50* or so inaccuracy -- If both cross-trailer readings are close, the hubs are OK).

I have found that the readings will vary a lot from trip to trip, depending on road temp, air temp, rain, sunshine, speed, etc. The important thing is to check everything, looking for something that stands out from the rest. The more often you check, the quicker you will build up a personal data base of what falls within the "normal" range for varying conditions.

A couple of years ago, I showed my Radio Shack IRT to a retired helicopter mechanic and he said he really wished he had had one when working. A friend bought his from Snap-On after his mechanic was examining exhaust temperatures cylinder by cylinder. Also good for shooting moving parts, like alternator bearings, when they are moving.
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Old 12-17-2007, 10:48 AM   #38
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Brian, you can easily get the hub temps even with the covers on -- Either put your hand around blind on the back and squeeze the button OR shoot the opposite wheel from underneath! (Byron, before you jump on me, this last would be a case where one really doesn't care about 50* or so inaccuracy -- If both cross-trailer readings are close, the hubs are OK).

I have found that the readings will vary a lot from trip to trip, depending on road temp, air temp, rain, sunshine, speed, etc. The important thing is to check everything, looking for something that stands out from the rest. The more often you check, the quicker you will build up a personal data base of what falls within the "normal" range for varying conditions.

A couple of years ago, I showed my Radio Shack IRT to a retired helicopter mechanic and he said he really wished he had had one when working. A friend bought his from Snap-On after his mechanic was examining exhaust temperatures cylinder by cylinder. Also good for shooting moving parts, like alternator bearings, when they are moving.

Not gonna jump on you. I've said my piece and in 2 or 3 years that'll all change. My poor old bones are telling me that new and better radiometers are coming. Well, maybe not my bones, more like magazines and other publications.

Besides accuracy over ambient temperature, there's one more improvement I'd like to see. Some sort of good aiming system. Laser diode light goes right through glass, water, and such where these things are opaque to IR.

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Old 12-22-2007, 11:34 PM   #39
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Besides accuracy over ambient temperature, there's one more improvement I'd like to see. Some sort of good aiming system. Laser diode light goes right through glass, water, and such where these things are opaque to IR.
How about some IR glasses to see the IR spot and KNOW where it is (and how big it is) ?
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Old 12-22-2007, 11:43 PM   #40
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How about some IR glasses to see the IR spot and KNOW where it is (and how big it is) ?
You don't need glasses to know where IR is, it's everywhere, so it's big, very big. Everything with a temperature above 0 degrees K emits IR energy. Now how do you keep IR energy from adversely effecting people?
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Old 12-23-2007, 12:10 PM   #41
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It would be interesting to see what Snap-On has to say about the accuracy of their device. They are one of the manufactures of high end tools and test equipment.

Checking Aircraft engine temps. We would use a grease pencil (I sometimes thought that the Army runs on grease pencils and floor buffers).

Would use the grease pencil to check cylinder head temp to spot a bad spark plug. Real scientific stuff there. The quicker it melted, the hotter it was. Was looking for a cooler cylinder head and depending which mag we were running on we could determine which of the 2 plugs was bad.

Also had an electronic device that looked like an aluminum rod with a temp gauge on the end. Would clip a lead to metal then put the pointed end of the rod on the part we were measuring and would get a reading. Was to much of a pain to go and get so just used the grease pencil in our pocket.
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Old 12-23-2007, 01:18 PM   #42
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OK, I thought I'd not say anything more about IR thermometers, but...

I checked Snap on's web site to see who was making their IR thermometers and look at their specifications. Results are;

This one is good. The specifications indicate it would work just fine for most trailer usage.

This one has issues. 1) Emissivity is adjustable, not for the average user. 2) Spot to distance ratio is so high that spot size is quite small, 30:1 30" away you get a 1" diameter spot. 3) High price.


The cheapest one has many issues. 1) recommended measuring distance is .5" to 2". 2) Spot distance ration 1.3:1 which would create huge side lobes. 3) No mention of emissivity.

This one doesn't mention ambient temperature operating range, which implies room temperature only.

This is probablly the best value for trailer purposes.

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