Lil Snoozy spare tire - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 02-16-2013, 04:22 PM   #15
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We keep ours under the bed in the left front corner. Other stuff under our bed includes 2 Alp lawn chairs, a screen tent, a folding table, grey water hose, fresh water hose, and a storage bin with extension cord, wheel chocks, and other misc. items.
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Old 02-16-2013, 04:25 PM   #16
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I too carry a small air compressor for tire repairs...

Per rear-mounting of spare on Snoozy:

Would it be practical to consider the mounting of a side-swing tire holder like those one sees on vans? I realize that in most cases those are fitted to the van door hinges, but I wonder if one couldn't modify such a thing to attach to separate hinges off to one side.

I s'pose it might require reinforcements of some kind- perhaps steel plates inside/outside at points of attachment. I had to do something similar to that when I mounted the awning on my Trillium and it's worked fine- no stress cracking/damage to fiberglass shell...

Francesca
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Old 02-16-2013, 05:16 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by honda03842 View Post
Anyone that really travels in an RV should carry a spare. Tires do fail, sometimes they simply find a road hazard.

In parts of this country and definitely traveling more northern than the US/Canadian borders you can find yourself on plenty of roads where you have to drive 200 miles to get a replacement tire.

I think every trailer should have a spare or at least provision for one.

I've been on plenty of roads where Good Sams or AAA or what ever are a longway away. Actually I don't recall ever hearing of a trailer without a spare until Snoozy. Until Snoozy and Eggcamper I never heard of one without propane.
I'm with him. I've needed mine many times. I can have a tire changed in under 10 minutes, how long will it take you to remove it, drive 50-100 miles somewhere, get it fixed or replaced (hopefully not after 5, or on sunday), and drive 50-100 miles back and install it? The same goes for a phone call.

I had a flat on the truck in the parking lot at work, and a guy 10 spaces away from me did, also. In 30 minutes, I was home in bed. I heard it was 2 hours before AAA even showed up for him. No thanks. To me, that's for completely broken down, not repairable situations.

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Originally Posted by Francesca Knowles View Post
Per leaving spare behind:

I learned to use the "greasy string" tire repair method so that I needn't carry a trailer spare. This because sometimes I really need tug/tow room for something else.

However: I still bring a spare if room allows, since in my opinion changin' is easier than repairing.

Francesca
90% of mine have been blowouts, that would take a lot of plugs and some intricate stitching.
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Old 02-16-2013, 05:55 PM   #18
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Quote:
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90% of mine have been blowouts, that would take a lot of plugs and some intricate stitching.
That's true...but- YIKES! Sounds like you've had a lot of blowouts!
Have you ever considered just throwin' in the pneumatic tire towel and goin' to solid rubber?


In over forty years of driving of all kinds of vehicles/trailers, I've had exactly one "blowout", and it was of a right front tire on my husband's truck, at fast-lane freeway speed. The only thing that saved my bacon was the fact that there was no one in the right lane when the truck lurched violently into it.... This within just a few weeks of having accepted my Dearly Beloved's opinion that the truck's in-my-opinion-done-for tires "had lots of life left" in them.

Needless to say, he's not in charge of that kind of decision any more....

I think that except for the relatively small number of road-hazard caused blowouts, most are caused by inattention to the tires themselves in terms of monitoring their age/condition/loads/air pressures, especially the latter two.

Here quoting from Safercar.Gov:

Quote:
Underinflated tires and overloaded vehicles are the leading causes of tire failure.
Seems to me like many flat tire-changing situations can be avoided altogether if we'd all pay a bit more attention to "where the rubber meets the road" in the first place!


Francesca
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Old 02-16-2013, 06:02 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Francesca Knowles View Post

True enough! Real "blowouts" are seldom repairable at all...do you think that the cause was undersizing/overloading?



Francesca
Neither, weight was well within tolerance of tire capacity. Could have been road debris, temp, tire quality, who knows... but the unexpected do happen, and being prepared is always a good plan... I travel on weekends and not all tire shop's are open on sundays. If something went wrong it would be good to be able to make it out of there...the idea of leaving my caravan on the side of the road while I go searching in a strange town looking for a tire is not my idea of a good plan.

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Old 02-16-2013, 06:10 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Francesca Knowles View Post
That's true...but- YIKES! Sounds like you've had a lot of blowouts!
Have you ever considered just throwin' in the pneumatic tire towel and goin' to solid rubber?


In over forty years of driving of all kinds of vehicles/trailers, I've had exactly one "blowout", and it was of a right front tire on my husband's truck, at fast-lane freeway speed. The only thing that saved my bacon was the fact that there was no one in the right lane when the truck lurched violently into it.... This within just a few weeks of having accepted my Dearly Beloved's opinion that the truck's in-my-opinion-done-for tires "had lots of life left" in them.

Needless to say, he's not in charge of that kind of decision any more....<_<

I think that except for the relatively small number of road-hazard caused blowouts, most are caused by inattention to the tires themselves in terms of monitoring their age/condition/loads/air pressures, especially the latter two.

Here quoting from Safercar.Gov:



Seems to me like many flat tire-changing situations can be avoided altogether if we'd all pay a bit more attention to "where the rubber meets the road" in the first place!


Francesca
I've only had one blowout on a vehicle, thank god. The bad part it was the right steer tire on a semi going around a left hand turn. I came close to putting it on its side.

I check tire pressure and hub temperature at every gas-up (which is only a couple hundred miles with the truck). they've gone within a few minutes of filling up. No idea why, not enough left to check it for road hazard, etc.
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Old 02-16-2013, 06:14 PM   #21
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Never had a complete blow out but have had two trailer tire failures in 5 years - one could have lead to a complete blow out had I not noticed it was starting to come apart and continued to have driven with it. Both failures happened in locations that were a *long* ways from the nearest town. Cant imagine anyone advising someone not to bother with carrying a spare.
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Old 02-16-2013, 08:27 PM   #22
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How about having a bracket made up to mount to the frame and come up the side of the trailer just behind the axle/tire. It shouldn't stick out much further than the tire does now, depending on how think of stock you use.
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Old 02-16-2013, 08:32 PM   #23
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All this talk about spares, when I get my ParkLiner home next weekend I wanna see if I have room to hang a 2nd spare on the underside. This way got forbid ya get a flat, going home you still have a spare lol

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Old 02-16-2013, 08:55 PM   #24
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We've never had a trailer or tow vehicle blow out in 180,000 tow vehicle miles. However we have had flats.

Like others we regularly check our tires and wheels at each stop. As well we have continuous tire pressure monitors on our trailer tires. I don't know if they'll warn us of a pending blowout, but certainly we should be able to detect a flattening tire.

To me a real spare on the tow vehicle as well as the trailer is mandatory. To suggest otherwise is almost suggesting you have not traveled very far or to 'out places'. There are many places where one of our road services will not get there in any realistic time, we've had it happen in the states. There are places where another RVer will not come along. In our trip across Labrador I don't remember ever seeing another RVer on the road.

As to storage of tire and other outside hardware, in general I like all the outdide stuff in outside storage in relatively fixed positions where it can't move around in an emergency stop. If outside stuff is to be inside, I like it accessible from the outside, just my preference.

Like many we carry a tire repair kits and a compressor.
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Old 02-16-2013, 09:47 PM   #25
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I thought of something else to add. In winter time, watch to see if your spare location accumulates ice, dirt, etc. It's not a problem here in kansas, but in North Dakota, my pickup spare went in the bed every winter. It only took one time of spending several hours to chip out the ice and rocks and get the winch working, and the wheel clean enough to mount, for me to learn my lesson. That's one hell if a miserable job at -30.
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Old 02-16-2013, 10:09 PM   #26
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Once upon a time, most folks knew how to repair a lot of things, including a flat tire. And that was back in the day, when tires had to be demounted in order to get at a tube!

The funny thing is, the advent of tubeless tires made it a LOT easier to repair a flat in the field...but nobody really knows how to fix things anymore, I guess. Still, the tools are out there for those who care to learn!

Francesca
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Old 02-16-2013, 10:29 PM   #27
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I have spoons, a grinder, glue, and plug-patches in the garage. I do most of my own flats, and trailer tire changes. I break beads using a high-lift jack in the receiver hitch of the pickup.
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Old 02-16-2013, 10:58 PM   #28
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I have been known to ply the spoons. Back in the day in last August I put a couple of F78s on my utility trailer rims. Perhaps not the pinnacle of mechanical competence and these days you have to pay to get the dead ones into the landfill. Self-sufficiency ain't what it usta was. I break stubborn beads with a deep throat sliding bar clamp.

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