Microwave in the furnace hole ? - Fiberglass RV


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Old 05-18-2014, 10:47 AM   #1
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Microwave in the furnace hole ?

We have a really nice 1977 Trillium.
It has the original furnace in it but we never use it. What we really want in our trailer is a microwave oven.
We never "rough it" or camp without power. We were thinking of removing the furnace and putting a microwave in the spot.
Has anyone out there done this ?
I am very handy but when it comes to propane I don't mess around so I am thinking maybe I need to have it professionally removed ?
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Old 05-18-2014, 12:51 PM   #2
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Removing is the easy part. Just make sure the gas is shut off at the tank (NO SMOKING) and then loosen the brass fitting on the furnace. More than likely it will be a compression fitting screwed onto a pipe adapter. Take that adapter to a hardware store (not a home center) and they will sell you the proper plug or cap that you need to seal it off.
Easy as fishin.
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Old 05-18-2014, 02:19 PM   #3
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even though it might be a compression fitting, I always go ahead and use thread sealer on the fitting threads just to be sure.
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Old 05-18-2014, 04:01 PM   #4
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Practicality depends on the location of the heater. A microwave may be too deep to fit in the spot. In the case of my '78 4500, the heater was located under the closet. There's only about six inches of depth in that cutout, due to the wheel well's presence.
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Old 05-19-2014, 08:04 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darwin Maring View Post
even though it might be a compression fitting, I always go ahead and use thread sealer on the fitting threads just to be sure.
Will all due respect, one should never use thread sealer of any kind on a compression or a flare fitting.
They are made to seal metal to metal. Using a sealer could cause a leak.
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Old 05-19-2014, 08:55 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Carl Brooks View Post
Will all due respect, one should never use thread sealer of any kind on a compression or a flare fitting.
They are made to seal metal to metal. Using a sealer could cause a leak.
With, as you say, all due respect I will use thread sealer on my stuff. I will not smear it on the tapered flare surfaces but will put a dab on the threads. It is great stuff and I have personally witnessed it do wonderous things and can not see how it would hurt.
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Old 05-19-2014, 10:50 AM   #7
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With all due respect: If you are a careful when you apply it, it will give you an additional level of protection.

After the connection, I always use a dish washing and water solution to look for bubbles on a pressurized system.
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Old 05-19-2014, 12:15 PM   #8
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Per thread sealer:

If you use it, do make sure that it's a type suitable for the application. Dope-types will have the information on the label; and tape-types will be yellow in color.
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Old 05-19-2014, 01:16 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl Brooks View Post
Will all due respect, one should never use thread sealer of any kind on a compression or a flare fitting.
They are made to seal metal to metal. Using a sealer could cause a leak.
1) Propane /Gas fittings are supposed to be a flared fitting not a compression fitting 2) Pipe dope or teflon tape is not to be used on flared gas fittings (In my area if the plumbing / gas inspector sees sealant on a flared fitting ,you will be replacing the fitting) As said above the seal is metal to metal only 3) Many appliance mfg's warranties are void if they find pipe dope /sealant on the gas connections 4) Profesional trades people have to follow the code , homeowners don't
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Old 05-19-2014, 02:29 PM   #10
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Do not take every opportunity to express your disagreement, incite argument, insult each other, or fan flames. Voice your opinion respectfully and then let it go.
The detail of whether to use some sealer material has been thoroughly discussed. Let's get back to the Original Poster's question.

Thank You.
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Old 05-19-2014, 02:53 PM   #11
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Would placing the microwave in the old furnace opening allow for adequate ventilation of the microwave ?.Most microwaves require ventilation space around the microwave so as to not to entrap heat .My microwave for instance requires a 1 1/2 " clearance on the sides and 3" of clearance above and behind the microwave
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Old 05-19-2014, 09:04 PM   #12
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There is no way I can even try to answer your question....but I have one of my own.You said:
It has the original furnace in it but we never use it. What we really want in our trailer is a microwave oven.

Now that I understand...but I just can't get the idea out of my head that the furnace is down close to the floor. If that is where the furnace is wouldn't that be to low and close to the floor for a microwave ?????

Anyway I was thinking about it and thought I would ask the question. Oh,one other thing. We MIGHT take the thing out ourselves,but we would have a pro seal the lines,just to be on the safe side.

Good luck and Happy Camping
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Old 05-20-2014, 02:35 PM   #13
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Going to need to know which Trillium you have. Is it a 1300, which should have the furnace under the sink, or a 4500, which has the furnace under the closet. Both sit in front of the wheel well, and the vent comes out the top half of the furnace over the top of the wheel well to the outside. There is space above the wheel well and below the top of the furnace. A very small microwave might fit there. I have the measurements of that space in a 4500, but they are at home. I will try to remember to post them tonight.

On edit: My wife found the measurements: 11"h x 24.5"w x 18"d. For reference, my $40 700W microwave is 10.5"h, (including the rubber feet) x 18"w x 12"d. So it looks like a small cheep microwave would fit in a 4500. I think a larger microwave would fit in the furnace hole of 1300. This is based on the guess that the kitchen cupboard would be higher then the bottom of the closet. But, this ignores the presence of the sink.

The existing furnace vent would allow for adequate ventilation to the back of the microwave. It also might allow too much water.

BTW. Please don't throw out your old furnace. If it works, I will buy most of it from you.
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