More Insulation - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 04-19-2013, 01:48 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Trailer: 84 16 ft Scamp
Posts: 725
More Insulation

For our use, the lack of insulation is a major reason we sometimes lust over upgrading to something like a Bigfoot 17.

Our major use is a winter trip to southern Texas via California to visit our kids and grand-kids. Both going and returning, there is at least one 'killer'' night, temperature wise in WA, OR and northern CA. Even with our propane fireplace and catalytic heater both going, I'm sure the comfort level would be greatly enhanced with 1/2 to 1 inch of foam insulation on the ceiling and walls.

But -- how would be the best way to do this? I'm not concerned about protecting tankage, as I have removed all tanks, going with the simplicity of plastic water bottles. The reason is primarily creature comfort as both of us are almost 70.

The best idea I've come up with on my own would be to use those 1/2 inch blue foam back packing sleeping mats, glued right over the existing thin ensolite. A few coats of polyurethane enamel of a more appropriate color should work to provide a smoodth cleanable surface. Being elastic it could be fit around the curves nicely, I'd think.

I can't be the only one who has entertained this kind of mod. It is highly possible that someone on this forum has already worked out the details on how-to-do this in a more elegant fashion and would be glad to share.

Thanks
__________________

__________________
Loren G. Hedahl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2013, 06:10 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Donna D.'s Avatar
 
Name: Donna D
Trailer: Escape 5.0 TA, 2014
Oregon
Posts: 24,433
I think in cold weather camping the floor is more of a problem. There's zero insulation and all that cold air running the length underneath.. brrrr. Prior to the hack, there was a member that used the blue styrofoam and glued it to the bottom of the floor. Because of the frame, etc. he pieced it like a puzzle. With the proper glue, blue styrofoam doesn't melt and it doesn't absorb water. Something to consider.

If you're looking for a post where someone glued insulation to the wall... here's one and its colorful!
Guess what I'm using for insulation!
__________________

__________________
Donna D.
Ten Forward - 2014 Escape 5.0 TA
Double Yolk - 1988 16' Scamp Deluxe
Donna D. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2013, 09:18 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Brian B-P's Avatar
 
Name: Brian
Trailer: Boler (B1700RGH) 1979
Alberta
Posts: 5,000
Quote:
Originally Posted by Donna D. View Post
I think in cold weather camping the floor is more of a problem. There's zero insulation and all that cold air running the length underneath.. brrrr. Prior to the hack, there was a member that used the blue styrofoam and glued it to the bottom of the floor. Because of the frame, etc. he pieced it like a puzzle. With the proper glue, blue styrofoam doesn't melt and it doesn't absorb water. Something to consider.
I agree that the floor is an issue, and an opportunity... an especially good one without under-floor tanks. I have considered this as well, with the same material.

Styrofoam™ is a trademark, and genuine Styrofoam is usually blue. There are other brands of extruded polystyrene foam, such as Foamular® (which is pink). Expanded polystyrene "beadboard" is cheaper but inferior.
__________________
1979 Boler B1700RGH, pulled by 2004 Toyota Sienna LE 2WD
Information is good. Lack of information is not so good, but misinformation is much worse. Check facts, and apply common sense liberally.
STATUS: No longer active in forum.
Brian B-P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2013, 10:41 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
SilverGhost's Avatar
 
Name: Jason
Trailer: Egg Camper
Tennessee
Posts: 323
Would any of you recommend the expanding foam for the wall cavities that are inaccessible? I believe a member on here redid her Burro (painted silver, I think) and filled all of the hollow panels with the stuff.

I like the foam idea for the floors. Where would you suggest getting Styrafoam? Something possibly similar at Home Depot/Lowes?

Jason
__________________
SilverGhost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2013, 10:56 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Name: kevin
Trailer: 13' Scamp
Colorado
Posts: 170
I have removable pieces of carpet for the floor which make a HUGE difference. You could also put down the under carpet foam underneath the carpet for even more insulation. The other issue is the windows. I use velcro to attach pieces of reflectix insulation cut to fit the windows. The nice thing about both these solutions is that you can remove them when you don't want them.
__________________
KevinScamps is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2013, 11:51 AM   #6
jmh
Junior Member
 
Name: Jim
Trailer: Boler
Alberta
Posts: 16
Registry
My floor was a cold spot last summer when the interior temp dropped withing 2 degrees of freezing on several nights. It's definitely the largest source of heat loss. I am in the process of insulating it using some leftover pieces of foam from when my house had new siding applied. It is 3/8 thick foam with a foil layer on one side. It is GreenGuard XFP38 fanfold siding underlayment and even has the Energy Star logo. I measured the floor and traced out the shape of it onto the foam, then cut the foam to fit. I'll place it with the foil side facing up. I am not going to fasten it, gravity and friction should be enough to keep it in place. I'll put a heavy vinyl flooring material on top which should be solid enough to keep the foam from compressing when you walk on it.

Regarding the walls, has anyone tried just applying a second layer of ensolite over top of the original ensolite, saving the effort of removing it and having twice the insulation?
__________________
jmh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2013, 07:34 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Donna D.'s Avatar
 
Name: Donna D
Trailer: Escape 5.0 TA, 2014
Oregon
Posts: 24,433
Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverGhost View Post
Would any of you recommend the expanding foam for the wall cavities that are inaccessible? I believe a member on here redid her Burro (painted silver, I think) and filled all of the hollow panels with the stuff.

I like the foam idea for the floors. Where would you suggest getting Styrafoam? Something possibly similar at Home Depot/Lowes?

Jason
Expanding foam... well, expands and may be too much to the point it puts pressure on the walls. I think there's a low expanding foam... or whatever it's called. But, I'm still not sure I'd use it. The walls may bulge and then how would you get it out?

If you're asking about the foam for the bottom of the floor (underneath) yes, Lowe's sells it in 4'x8' sheets.
__________________
Donna D.
Ten Forward - 2014 Escape 5.0 TA
Double Yolk - 1988 16' Scamp Deluxe
Donna D. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2013, 07:41 PM   #8
Commercial Member
 
tractors1's Avatar
 
Name: Charlie Y
Trailer: Escape 21 - Felicity
Oregon
Posts: 1,127
I'd get a quote from one of the home insulation companies that do spray foam - would be much more efficient at insulating not only the floor, but also the tanks. And a WHOLE LOT less work than laying on your back holding stuff up while the glue to the bottom of the floor takes hold...........

Charlie Y
__________________
Charlie Y

Don't drill holes, try custom storage you design: http://RVWidgetWorks.com
tractors1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2013, 09:09 PM   #9
Member
 
chse's Avatar
 
Name: Chris
Trailer: 13' Scamp
Pennsylvania
Posts: 90
Registry
I did quite some winter camping in Europe. One of the biggest entrance points for cold imo are the windows, especially if they are single-sheeted like in the scamp. In Europe I bought a special clear, thick bubble wrap that can be attached to the outside with a push-botton fastener and covers the window and window-frame. We also had a skirt that wrapped around the bottom of the camper to keep wind out, but this has to be held on the ground with ankers or stones.
I think a thick carpet is a much better solution than attaching foam to the underside. In addition you could get special foam in a carpet shop that is normally used for noise and cold insulation in homes.
The scamps felt fur is a pretty good insulation with 2 additional layers of insulating matts underneath, not sure if this needs improvement.
Be careful, though if you completely close up the camper there is a danger of suffocation.
__________________
chse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2013, 11:57 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Name: Chris
Trailer: Boler
Alberta
Posts: 291
I was reading about winter camping and it was suggested that using reflectix to insulate around the bottom of the trailer to the ground on the outside. I have seen a package at home depot about the right height for $30. I plan on trying it when camping below freezing. Only problem I see is setting it up each time you move camp (and possibly freezing to the ground).
__________________
Nelmes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2013, 08:00 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
Name: Paul
Trailer: '07 Scamp 16' SD
Wisconsin
Posts: 110
I saw that someone on the airforums had used corkboard underneath vinyl as insulation on the floor with some success. I may try this when I yank the carpet on our scamperoo
__________________
glennco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2013, 08:22 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
Brian B-P's Avatar
 
Name: Brian
Trailer: Boler (B1700RGH) 1979
Alberta
Posts: 5,000
Quote:
Originally Posted by chse View Post
We also had a skirt that wrapped around the bottom of the camper to keep wind out, but this has to be held on the ground with ankers or stones.
Skirting is normal for people using RVs long-term (such as for a whole season) in sub-freezing conditions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nelmes View Post
I was reading about winter camping and it was suggested that using reflectix to insulate around the bottom of the trailer to the ground on the outside... Only problem I see is setting it up each time you move camp (and possibly freezing to the ground).
That's a common skirting method. The other problems include attaching it to the trailer in a way that works in the cold and does not damage the trailer's finish, matching to uneven ground, the lack of durability of this material when moved and reused, access to waste dump fittings, fitting it around the door, access to storage compartments, and the fact that many campgrounds do not allow it because they are not for long term stays and it can look terrible.

A fitted skirt of upholstery fabric and fasteners permanently mounted on the body can address most of these issues, at high cost, if you don't mind the fasteners all around the trailer.
__________________
1979 Boler B1700RGH, pulled by 2004 Toyota Sienna LE 2WD
Information is good. Lack of information is not so good, but misinformation is much worse. Check facts, and apply common sense liberally.
STATUS: No longer active in forum.
Brian B-P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2013, 08:31 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
Name: None
Trailer: None
None
Posts: 2,736
foam

Quote:
Originally Posted by Donna D. View Post
Expanding foam... well, expands and may be too much to the point it puts pressure on the walls. I think there's a low expanding foam... or whatever it's called. But, I'm still not sure I'd use it. The walls may bulge and then how would you get it out?

If you're asking about the foam for the bottom of the floor (underneath) yes, Lowe's sells it in 4'x8' sheets.
Spray foam acts like a glue , get some on your hands and try to get it off
They make a minimal expanding foam to stop bulging . I have seen windows and doors that were stuck closed by people using triple expanding foam to seal around the jambs. My question is how does sheet foam placed on the bottom of a trailer hold up to UV , road debris . air movement and water . (Some foams do absorb moisture)
Does the foam need a protective cover and could the foam trap moisture
__________________
steve dunham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2013, 09:54 AM   #14
Commercial Member
 
tractors1's Avatar
 
Name: Charlie Y
Trailer: Escape 21 - Felicity
Oregon
Posts: 1,127
Ensolite is a brand name of closed-cell foam (meaning it does not absorb water) commonly used for camping pads. I have a large sheet (6x9 ft) that I've used on a concrete basement floor for decades that looks like new despite foot traffic around my work area. I've only seen it in blue and about 1/2 inch thick, very flexible. Also used in some campers as internal insulation under the wall carpeting.

Charlie Y
__________________

__________________
Charlie Y

Don't drill holes, try custom storage you design: http://RVWidgetWorks.com
tractors1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
insulation Hazel in Sk Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 9 07-15-2012 09:43 AM
Insulation Brian Tin Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 12 11-02-2010 09:02 PM
Ensolite insulation Mark LL Modifications, Alterations and Updates 2 12-02-2009 04:43 PM
Insulation Rick T Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 8 03-22-2009 07:56 AM
Insulation Willie Brown Ft. Langley B.C. Rallies 0 12-31-1969 07:00 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:06 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.