New Electric Brakes/hubs on '76 Trillium 1300 - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 12-29-2012, 09:33 AM   #15
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My 77 1300 has trailing arms, and a plate, but no brakes. My 73? has leading arms, and no plate.
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Old 12-29-2012, 01:27 PM   #16
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Thank you both for your very helpful information and suggestions.

Walter
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Old 12-29-2012, 03:27 PM   #17
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'76 Trillium 1300 Hub Flange Specs ?

Now that it has been confirmed that there is in fact a flange that the original wheel hub mounts to, would anyone happen to know any details about the original mounting flange for the hubs?

To add electric brakes to the flange as is, it would need to be 4 hole with each hole 7/16" in dia and the holes spaced 2 7/8" apart.

This question would also be answered if anyone had successfully added 7" electric brakes to the original (? 4 hole) hub mounting flange without having to modify it for the electric brake's 4 screw back mounting plate.

Sorry for all the questions. Thank you.

Walter
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Old 12-29-2012, 03:47 PM   #18
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No need to apologize for asking questions, but I hope you're not making any buying decisions based on our answers, at least at this point.

I'm not sure if anything's been confirmed since according to one of your earlier posts you haven't even seen the trailer (or at least this part of it) and won't for several more months.

As is evident from various posts, you could be possessed of one of several configurations...if the trailer even still has its original axle!

If whoever actually has the trailer right this minute can be persuaded to take/send you some pictures, I encourage you to get them before you plan much further...

Francesca
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Old 12-29-2012, 05:37 PM   #19
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'76 Trillium 1300 Electric Brake Installation

Asking for more pictures from the seller is a very good idea and something that is planned for after the first of the year .

Unfortunately, looking at pictures will not tell me the hole sizes of the old hub installation flange or whether anyone has previously taken off the old hubs and successfully bolted on new 7" electric brakes. For that information I am very appreciative of any forum member input.

I will not be using the information obtained from forum members to make a buying decision. The information will be extremely helpful in planning what I will be doing to upgrade the trailer once I get it. My first priorty is to make sure it as safe as possible to tow.

RVing is a relatively new experience for me only having done it for 4 yrs. It has taken me that long to learn the ins and outs of repairing and painting fiberglass, fixing the refrig thermostat, getting the propane heater to work, repairing the generator carburator, adding new springs, getting the appropriate E class tires, etc.

Because all these mods take time and research is why I am starting early with this travel trailer to get prepared for adding the electric brakes, rewiring the hitch connectors to go from 6 pin of TV to 7 pin on the trailer, adding a brake controller to an older tv and possibly adding a new axle to the trailer as well . It would also be nice to complete these mods before the start of the summer traveling season which tends to always be too short.

So this my rationale, and again forum member help has been and is greatly appreciated.

Walter
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Old 12-29-2012, 05:44 PM   #20
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I was thinking more along the lines of whether or not there's a plate there at all, as illustrated by Dave's post here:

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Tilston View Post
My 77 1300 has trailing arms, and a plate, but no brakes. My 73? has leading arms, and no plate.
There's a lot of what you might call "variety" when it comes to first-gen Trilliums!

Anyway...

Happy planning!

Francesca
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Old 12-29-2012, 07:12 PM   #21
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Brakes on '76 Trillium

You are quite right for pointing this variation out! Thank you. It will take 2 more pieces of info with pictures to start with to complete the planning.

Walter
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Old 12-30-2012, 01:07 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by georgewa View Post
... a flange that the original wheel hub mounts to, would anyone happen to know any details about the original mounting flange for the hubs?

To add electric brakes to the flange as is, it would need to be 4 hole with each hole 7/16" in dia and the holes spaced 2 7/8" apart.

This question would also be answered if anyone had successfully added 7" electric brakes to the original (? 4 hole) hub mounting flange without having to modify it for the electric brake's 4 screw back mounting plate...
I think you already understand this, but the hub doesn't mount to the brake flange at all - the hub rides on the outer parts of the bearings, the inner parts of the bearings ride on the spindle, and that flange only holds the brake backing plate.

Since the brake drum and hub are a single piece of iron in the typical trailer hub & brake design, the bolts in the hub/drum must match the wheels, but those 4 (or 5) bolts have no relationship to the (typically) 4 bolts that hold the backing plate to the mounting flange.

Good drawings of typical hub and brake hardware are provided in Dexter Axle's literature.
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Old 12-30-2012, 04:47 PM   #23
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'76 Trillium 1300 trailer brake install on original flange?

You are correct in saying that in a situation where you are removing or installing trailer electric brakes, the 4 bolt electric brake back plate mounts to the 4 hole flange, not the hub. The hub has bolts in the front to mount the wheel. Thank you for clarifying this.

I am still game to hear from anyone who has a '76 Trillium 1300 with a mounting flange on the base of the axle spindle and has successfully installed 7" electric brakes on that spindle flange.

Thank you.
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Old 01-02-2013, 06:37 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by Spanke View Post

Since yours is a 1976, your axle is probably shot also. If you can "spring" for it, you may want to consider replacing it with brakes installed instead of adding new brakes to a worn out axle. Just a suggestion.

Good luck with your project.

Spanke
I have read that the typical life of one of these axles is 20 years. If so, Spanke's suggestion may be the best advice you've received. Raz
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Old 01-02-2013, 12:02 PM   #25
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Electric brakes on '76 Trillium 1300

You are both probably right about replacing the axle with a new one and electric brakes. Expenses could be reduced if I were to do everything except install the axle. Some additional pictures of the Trillium will hopefully arrive this week and tell me if a brake flange is present at the base of the spindle.

The angle of the axle arm will at least give me some hint of the axle condition in addition to its known age. If I do go with the new axle and brakes, I'm leaning towards an Al-ko or Flexiride because both have replaceable spindles .

Thank you again.

Walter
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Old 01-02-2013, 12:28 PM   #26
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I don't agree with the automaticity of the worn out axle. My '78 4500 still has the original axle, and in addition to whatever miles were on it when I bought it seven years ago, I've put over 40,000 miles more on it. I think that just as with any vehicle, much depends on how much it's been abused...


Here's a method described by another member here for performing a simple assessment of axle condition. It's from this long discussion, which is worth a read for anyone interested in the subject.


Post #57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe in MN View Post
Well, this is what I'm thinking, but I could easily be wrong - if the rubber is still springy, the weight of the trailer would be compressing the suspension somewhat all the time while sitting, and when the trailer was jacked up, the tires would stay on the ground for a bit until that "static compression" was taken out by jacking.

Think of it in reverse - if the trailer was suspended in the air and you gently set it down, the tires should rise up into the wheel wells a bit as the suspension compresses. This isn't happening in my case when I reverse the process, tires come off the ground IMMEDIATELY. There may in fact be some spring left between the resting position and the going-over-a-bump position (which is where you really want it), but I think my scenario means not a lot of springiness left anywhere.

I jack at the frame just ahead of the axle, which I believe is where Scamp recommends jacking. ($30 bottle jack from Northern Tool plus a Sears jack stand and chocks for safety - works really well for me so far.) I doubt that jacking up both wheels would tell you anything that one at a time wouldn't tell you, and it might stress the frame more - from what I've read, you have to watch how you jack Scamps up, as you can put stress in places where the frame isn't happy about it. On the frame, right next to the axle, preferably in front of it, and one side at a time is the best way, I think.
Francesca
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Old 01-02-2013, 01:41 PM   #27
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'76 Trillium 1300 electric brakes plus axle?

Thank you for the opinion that axle age alone does not automaticly mean you need a new axle. A number of tests have been recommended in the threads including looking at the tire wear pattern to help determine if you really need to replace the axle. If I can get by for the time being with just adding electric brakes that will be fine with me.
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Old 01-02-2013, 01:45 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by georgewa View Post
Thank you for the opinion that axle age alone does not automaticly mean you need a new axle. A number of tests have been recommended in the threads including looking at the tire wear pattern to help determine if you really need to replace the axle. If I can get by for the time being with just adding electric brakes that will be fine with me.
My UHaul is a 1985 and still has good ride height and plenty of suspension travel, so age is not the single determinant of axle condition.

Oh darn, I think I just agreed with Francesca.
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