Portable compressor recommendations? - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 09-22-2007, 01:35 PM   #15
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We have a really handy one at work that we use to pump up tires. It is built into a battery jumper box so it has it's own power supply, air compressor with gage, jumper cables to start your vehicle, a light and convenience receptacles for other 12VDC items and a charging plug to charge it up from 120VAC and another jumper to charge it up from your 12VDC vehicle.

The heaver the unit - the more battery power you have and the more they cost. I have seen them sell anywhere from $45USD and up.

You could also connect it to your egg battery to extended your DC run time.
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Old 09-23-2007, 05:22 PM   #16
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Quote:
You could also connect it to your egg battery to extended your DC run time.
Forgot to mention that I also carry one of those 12VDC outlets on a short cable with alligator clamps for clamping directly on a battery as Darwin suggests.
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Old 09-23-2007, 06:17 PM   #17
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Pete, I also have a "Bully" Adapter model "TC-127" that plugs into the 7 blade tow vehicle receptacle and it has a 7 blade output receptacle along with a 4 or 5 flat receptacle and 2 12VDC cigarette type receptacles. This puts t receptacles at the rear of the tow vehicle that you can plug lights, air compressors, etc into. Got it from www.jcw.com

Here's a thought. I saw a built in air compressor in a Pontiac a few years ago so I recon that a person could get a higher quality compressor at a junk yard and mount it to your tug or egg.
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Old 09-23-2007, 09:24 PM   #18
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The salvaged compressor is an interesting idea.

The Pontiac was perhaps a Montana van with the factory rear air suspension. Other light vehicles with optional air suspensions would include the Montana's GM siblings, some current full-size SUVs (e.g. Ford Expedition), and some old Lincolns (Mark VII? LSC?). Air suspensions typically use pressures somewhat higher than tires, and of course these compressors would be 12VDC powered, so they are a promising match. I have no idea of their flow rate capabilities - air springs are small in volume compared to tires, so the compressors built for them might not be very big.
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Old 09-24-2007, 08:17 PM   #19
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Val,
Another thing to consider is how the pump is connected. If it has a cigar-lighter plug, it will only be 100 W or so, limited by the fuse feeding the outlet (my Nissan's is 10 A). I saw that pump at Costco that Tom mentioned . It looked to be a good heavy-duty unit (better for your truck tires), and it has clamps to connect directly to the battery.

Marv
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Old 09-24-2007, 10:10 PM   #20
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Wow! Only in the U.S. of A. would there be so many different options available for consumers to choose from.

That Costco one is sounding very appealing and I am also okay with getting a Wagan-Tech $25 model that allows for up to an hour pump time and has both the cigarette lighter adapter and direct-to-battery clamps (I realize that if it's as slow as some of them are, one might need that much time to inflate just a few tires, but for my "emergency only" purposes, that should do fine. If not, this dialogue will be a great resource to return to for choosing a higher end unit).

Thank you to everyone who has put in (or will later add) their 2 cents to this discussion!

Val
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Old 09-25-2007, 11:48 AM   #21
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The connection type does suggest the power consumption. For instance, of the two Harbor Freight units which I listed, the smaller one has a lighter plug and a 15A fuse; the larger one has battery clips and a 30A motor.

Having an adapter with battery clips and a lighter socket will bypass the tug's lighter fuse, but may not help much since the sockets are not good for high currents, and any compressor sold with a lighter plug probably doesn't draw a lot of current... I'm surprised that smaller Harbor Freight unit has a fuse as high as 15A.

Ironically, although the wide variety of available consumer goods is impressive, my guess is that most of them are made in China. The "Central Pneumatic" brand of the Harbor Freight compressors is obviously designed to sound familiar, referring to the well-known Chicago Pneumatic brand.
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Old 09-25-2007, 05:54 PM   #22
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In my case, the direct clamp-on socket was to bypass the cigarette lighter's potentially weak wiring, based on inverter low-voltage shutdown experience, rather than its fuse.
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Old 09-26-2007, 12:43 PM   #23
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Quote:
Ironically, although the wide variety of available consumer goods is impressive, my guess is that most of them are made in China. The "Central Pneumatic" brand of the Harbor Freight compressors is obviously designed to sound familiar, referring to the well-known Chicago Pneumatic brand.
Your quite right, Brian, and the Central Pneumatic one that looked half-way decent has brass fittings that contain lead (I checked out the downloadable owner's manual, which actually contained a warning, only because I guess they are being sold in California, which requires a Prop 65 warning label. I guess other states don't care?). Cheap imports of any kind (be they hardware or food) come at a high price on so many levels.
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Old 09-26-2007, 03:25 PM   #24
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Your quite right, Brian, and the Central Pneumatic one that looked hal-way decent has brass fittings that contain lead (I checked out the downloadable owner's manual, which actually contained a warning, only because I guess they are being sold in California, which requires a Prop 65 warning label. I guess other states don't care?). Cheap imports of any kind (be they hardware or food) come at a high price on so many levels.
I have to let my trailer tires down to about 15 psi when going back to the river (45 miles one way of wash board sharp rocks). So I bought a 12v compressor and it worked but took forever to bring them back up to 50. So then I went and bought 120vac compressor that works twice as fast but still slow and I have to crank up the Honda.

So now I just fill a small 10 gallon air tank to 100 psi and take me about 60 seconds each side to re-inflate.

Someone told me you can get real small nitrogen tanks too.

Ron
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Old 09-26-2007, 04:38 PM   #25
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Your quite right, Brian, and the Central Pneumatic one that looked half-way decent has brass fittings that contain lead (I checked out the downloadable owner's manual, which actually contained a warning, only because I guess they are being sold in California, which requires a Prop 65 warning label. I guess other states don't care?). Cheap imports of any kind (be they hardware or food) come at a high price on so many levels.
I recently read the first couple of pages of "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn" and learned that seltzer bottles had lead stoppers in them and the guy who would buy bottles and lead back was called a junkie... Times change!
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Old 09-26-2007, 07:20 PM   #26
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Someone told me you can get real small nitrogen tanks too.
Dry nitrogen has been used for years to inflate tires, and even run air tools to a limited extent, by auto racing teams. It doesn't really matter that it's nitrogen (rather than air), but the key is the pressure: with a tank at 30 times the pressure of the 100 psi portable air tank, a useful amount of "air" can be carried in a small space, with no need for a compressor. It's not a cheap way to go for occasional use, and once it runs out you're off to an industrial gas supplier (not just any gas station with a tire pump), but until it runs out it is effective.
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Old 09-26-2007, 09:51 PM   #27
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Hi kids!
I use the combo jump start, air compressor from Harbor Freight (39.99) It'll jump the truck and fill the tires to 65# fairly fast. Can also use it to power electric 12v blanket, 12v coffee pot, 12v heater(truckers cab heater) as it has a cigarette light OUTLET but uses clamps for jump starting. hows the campground hunt going? Hope to see you in the near future,
Chuck
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