Powertron Converter in Boler 1700SGH - Fiberglass RV


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Old 02-18-2008, 02:39 PM   #1
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Hi all

So, out of curiosity, I opened the converter, and If you see just above the circuit board, there is a coiled wire that runs between the two screws on the board. The wire is split, but it is hard to tell if I was burnt, or is made to be like that.

The blue wire you see running to the right screw originates off the transformer, to a spring loaded rocker swith which is attached to a blue cylinder-like piece which is able to make contact with the rocker switch
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Before I disconnected the power, all the lights and plugs seemed to work fine when the Camper was plugged in/

Any ideas if I should solder that coiled piece together?

Your thoughts are appreciated

Jay
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Old 02-18-2008, 02:45 PM   #2
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Here is better pic?


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Old 02-18-2008, 04:17 PM   #3
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that coiled wire looks like either a resistor or a fuse element of some type, solder probably won't work.
Is there any type of wiring diagram?

Joe
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Old 02-18-2008, 05:23 PM   #4
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I would guess it is a shunt for measuring current draw. I can't see the number on the IC on the board but guess it would be a 723 regulator. If so then the wire would be part of the current monitoring circuit. It could also be an OpAmp comparator controlling the output relay so the supply would disconnect when an overload occurs.

I don't think you will be able to solder it back together. It is probably made of nichrome wire which can't be soldered. This assumption is supported by the fact that the ends of the wire are attached to screws, not soldered to the board.

Do you have a way of measuring the resistance of the wire? Also, can you tell me the part number stamped on the IC?

73
Orlen

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Old 02-18-2008, 05:44 PM   #5
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I would guess it is a shunt for measuring current draw. I can't see the number on the IC on the board but guess it would be a 723 regulator. If so then the wire would be part of the current monitoring circuit. It could also be an OpAmp comparator controlling the output relay so the supply would disconnect when an overload occurs.

I don't think you will be able to solder it back together. It is probably made of nichrome wire which can't be soldered. This assumption is supported by the fact that the ends of the wire are attached to screws, not soldered to the board.

Do you have a way of measuring the resistance of the wire? Also, can you tell me the part number stamped on the IC?

73
Orlen

I dont have a wiring diagram, and I know little when it comes to electrical theory. I have a cheapo Princess Auto mulitimeter I will go measure the resistance now, and I will go look at that IC.

Thanks
Jay
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Old 02-18-2008, 05:58 PM   #6
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I would guess it is a shunt for measuring current draw. I can't see the number on the IC on the board but guess it would be a 723 regulator. If so then the wire would be part of the current monitoring circuit. It could also be an OpAmp comparator controlling the output relay so the supply would disconnect when an overload occurs.

I don't think you will be able to solder it back together. It is probably made of nichrome wire which can't be soldered. This assumption is supported by the fact that the ends of the wire are attached to screws, not soldered to the board.

Do you have a way of measuring the resistance of the wire? Also, can you tell me the part number stamped on the IC?

73
Orlen

Well, if I measured the resistance properly, it reads 00.8. I cant find the number 723, where exactly am I looking?!


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Old 02-18-2008, 10:14 PM   #7
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Well, if I measured the resistance properly, it reads 00.8. I cant find the number 723, where exactly am I looking?!
Hi Jason

The resistance of 0.8 ohms sounds about right if it is a current shunt. The idea behind the shunt is that when current goes through it there is a small voltage drop across the shunt. This drop can be measured by an opamp comparator or a voltage regulator integrated circuit. If the current gets too high the control circuit will disconnect the output so you don't destroy the power converter or the equipment connected to it.

Is the blue cylinder-like piece you mentioned in the original post the device shown above and behind the small circuit board shown in the first picture? If so it is a relay, probably connected in series with the output. If an over-current condition occurs the relay will open and disconnect the output.

The IC I mentioned is the black rectangle in the middle of the circuit board with 14 or 16 pins. The part number will be stamped on the top (usually in really tiny letters). You didn't mention if there is any marking on or around the switch but I would bet that it says reset or something similar if it is marked.

Can you e-mail me a better picture? Something with better resolution so I can enlarge it.

BTW - This is probably fixable without spending money.

73
Orlen
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Old 02-19-2008, 10:33 AM   #8
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Hi Jason

The resistance of 0.8 ohms sounds about right if it is a current shunt. The idea behind the shunt is that when current goes through it there is a small voltage drop across the shunt. This drop can be measured by an opamp comparator or a voltage regulator integrated circuit. If the current gets too high the control circuit will disconnect the output so you don't destroy the power converter or the equipment connected to it.

Is the blue cylinder-like piece you mentioned in the original post the device shown above and behind the small circuit board shown in the first picture? If so it is a relay, probably connected in series with the output. If an over-current condition occurs the relay will open and disconnect the output.

The IC I mentioned is the black rectangle in the middle of the circuit board with 14 or 16 pins. The part number will be stamped on the top (usually in really tiny letters). You didn't mention if there is any marking on or around the switch but I would bet that it says reset or something similar if it is marked.

Can you e-mail me a better picture? Something with better resolution so I can enlarge it.

BTW - This is probably fixable without spending money.

73
Orlen
I really appreciate the help, Orlen. I will get you those pictures right away.
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Old 02-19-2008, 10:51 AM   #9
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I was going to stay out of this one but I looked at that picture again. It appears that coil of wire burned in two. If that's the case then the first thing that needs to happen is to find out why it burned.
A burned wire, nichrome or other wise, is caused by over current. Two issues come to mind here. One, what caused the over current situation? Two, why didn't the over current protection of the converter shut the converter down before the smoke was let out that wire.

Number two above would require a qualified technician to trouble shoot and repair. Without that repair it's bound to happen again. It's probably cheaper and safer to replace the converter.
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