Problem No. 1 from shake down weekend - Fiberglass RV


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Old 07-03-2007, 12:14 AM   #1
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First time away in the 13 ft. Boler. Great to try it out, but now some concerns!
Hard to concentrate on one's driving, when you look in the rear view mirror and see projectile dishes, coming from the top cupboard, that had thumb-latches! The iron grills on the gas stove, wound up on the floor,(we only have 1 of those little metal clips to hold them in, ? how many should there be?)
The table slide half-way off in the forward direction, on the way to the campground, and on the way home jumped right off the rails, and bounced down,scratching the new paint job.
Even curtain rods came down!
Is this a bit excessive? How does the table get anchored down, if need be? We did have it in the down, ie. bed position.
We are about to make new cupboard doors and are now fretting about the best type of latches to use, so things will stay shut. Happened upon an RV store, and noticed the latches used in the latest big RVs, ie. a V shaped metal clasp, between 2 roller balls--doesn't look strong enough for this situation.
The trailer was riding a bit nose up, as I believe is okay. A mechanic welded the frame,( had a small crack, and at the same time, elevated the whole thing, so we could hit the bush roads. But this weekend was all on pavement!! Is there something we are missing? Thanks!
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Old 07-03-2007, 12:30 AM   #2
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First time away in the 13 ft. Boler. Is there something we are missing? Thanks!
BUNGEE CORDS!!!!!! they come in all sizes..... Honestly, that how the wench and I have solved most of the projectile problems. Little ones between the cuboard knobs, larger one holding the closet door closed, and a large one from the bottom of the gaucho to the bottom of the outside door to close the gap that sucks up road dust. Larry (the thrifty/cheap redneck)
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Old 07-03-2007, 04:29 AM   #3
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Regarding curtain rods... I use twist ties to keep them from popping off. Easy to do, and to un-do.

And I use a bungee cord to make doubly sure the main door doesn't fly open as we're driving down the road. That was an alarming sight I hope not to see again!

Our Trillium countertop slants down towards the outer wall, but I understand that is how Trills were made, for some strange reason.

Haven't had much trouble with our cupboard and closet doors, but I almost always have to pick up the seat cushions off the floor when we stop. (Did you ever see that old Lucille Ball movie with her in a moving trailer? She had a wild ride!)
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Old 07-03-2007, 06:14 AM   #4
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Peggy, you are describing a classic case of having a worn-out axle. Any one of those things you describe is happenstance. We've all had an unlatched door pop open, lost a curtain rod that wasn't secure, or something. But if all of them are happening, you're either running off-road through some nasty pasture land at high speeds, or there's a very good chance that there is an axle replacement in your immediate future. None of those things should happen on a normal piece of pavement. A single axle trailer will bounce a little more than a tandem or triple, but I have left "stuff" on the kitchen counter inadvertently and found it not moved at all in a trailer with a good axle. In a trailer with a bad axle (and I've had both) I've bounced the cushions off the couch!

A rubber torsion axle has a design life of about twenty years. Some make it to fifteen, some to thirty but anytime after twenty years is borrowed time.

Rather than looking for quick fixes, first check your axle for "bounce". Have someone stand in the doorway and jump up and down while you stand outside and look at the wheel well. The wheel well should lower over the tire from one to two inches with each bounce. If all you see is tire sidewall flex, then your axle needs to be replaced.

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Old 07-03-2007, 09:11 AM   #5
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Suggestion: Find a rough gravel road in a place where it is prudent to take turns riding in the trailer for a couple of minutes (may be against the law in some jurisdictions, but this would be only a short test).

The experience will tell you a lot about what is going on and suggest to you what needs to be done to secure "stuff." We did it and it was an eye opener and a vailuable experience, even though our axle works normally.
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Old 07-03-2007, 10:05 AM   #6
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The table slide half-way off in the forward direction, on the way to the campground, and on the way home jumped right off the rails, and bounced down,scratching the new paint job.
Even curtain rods came down!
Is this a bit excessive? How does the table get anchored down, if need be? We did have it in the down, ie. bed position.
Hi Peggy,

My table solution was this:
I travel with the table in the upright position. I have installed small hooks at the bottom front of each side of the bench seats. I strap a bungee from the table hardware down to each side. It has some play in it so the hooks don't pop out of the benches, but keeps the table from moving around.
I also 'stuff' the area under the table. I use plastic totes for our clothing, etc. and they fit nicely under the table with the back cushions between to cushion the bench.
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Old 07-03-2007, 10:54 AM   #7
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. A mechanic welded the frame,( had a small crack, and at the same time, elevated the whole thing, so we could hit the bush roads. But this weekend was all on pavement!! Is there something we are missing? Thanks!
Sounds a bit excessive to me. I think Roger is right. Flying objects would be a normal situation if you had been on washboard roads filled with potholes. I think you should check your axel.
John
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Old 07-03-2007, 01:04 PM   #8
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Sounds a bit excessive to me too. In addition to all the other good advice, I might add - How fast were you driving? I find that if I'm going my 'unhitched' highway speeds of 70 or above, I find more belongings bounced around. If I slow it down to 65, everything is fine.
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Old 07-03-2007, 01:04 PM   #9
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Sounds like my maiden voyage except I hit a rough road just north of Calgary and SLAM, the storage box (still had no cupboard doors at the time) slid into the door and it swung open. My wife was less than impressed uttering "are you trying to make me hate this?". So I now have a better latch on the door, and am learning how to pack stuff better.

Last trip we added some water to the tank to weigh the trailer down and that helped a bit of the bounce but I do believe a new axle is in order at some point, its 32 years old and has seen better days like me.

Trip three is this weekend, I can only hope it gets better.

Dave
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Old 07-03-2007, 01:51 PM   #10
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Roger's right -- Check the axle.

At least you have a welder ready to install it <g>.
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Old 07-03-2007, 01:59 PM   #11
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Yes the axles are a major concern but here's a little tip on the inside doors, when you replace the hinges, look for and get the ones that have the built in tensor spring, it helps to keep them shut, and also makes the doors close easier too! The latches ...I am still looking for replacements in gray color. Can only seem to find them (at our favoritr R.V. dealer) in the antique bronze color!
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Old 07-03-2007, 06:30 PM   #12
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I don't leave anyhing in my cupboards "loose" I have plastic baskets in there that all the plates etc are in that way even if the doors swing open, nothing comes out... I also use twist ties on the curtain rods... as far as the cushions staying in place, try some of that stuff you put under a throw rug to keep it from slipping... I learned the hard way, way back when when, when I had my first Casita!
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Old 07-03-2007, 08:57 PM   #13
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On our Burro doors, we installed hood and eyes to keep them closed. We used a shoe holder in the closet with Coleman mish bags holding the stuff inside them. Then we used the pillows stuffed into the cupboard to keep the stuff in them from moving. We used ties to keep the curtain rods hanging up.
Happily, it is not a problem with the UHaul. The doors and drawers are all made to stay shut. The curtain rods are those spring rods that used to be common. I found them on ebay from England. They have enough tension to hold the curtains.

CindyL
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Old 07-03-2007, 09:03 PM   #14
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Cindy, I'd be interested in seeing how the u-haul doors and drawers are made, so that they stay shut. Any photos? Thanks.
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