Propane stove mod - Fiberglass RV


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Old 08-23-2007, 06:44 PM   #1
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After a furious camping summer with the new to us Scamp, one of the ideas I'm kicking around is better functionality with the propane stove.
Never used it yet, always use the portable one outside. What I'm thinking is to remove the permanent propane stove and build a sort of containment box that mounts down in the hole and the portable stove sets in the containment box with a cover which goes over that so externally no difference from existing. Then run a hose connection with a shutoff so that it can be hooked to the propane tank and used inside if needed. Otherwise, you just lift it out and take it out to the table and use it outdoors with a bottle. Don't recall seeing a mod out here like this, anyone done one similar?
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Old 08-23-2007, 07:41 PM   #2
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Isn't this kind of like the portable stove used in a tent trailer?? I remember several years back my cousin taking the stove out of the inside his Coleman trailer and using it outside. There was a bracket, similar to an awning rail that the stove was mounted to....

Sounds like a good idea to me, at any rate.
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Old 08-23-2007, 08:40 PM   #3
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I believe a portable Coleman propane stove uses high pressure and is not meant for use indoors. A high pressure leak inside would be a very bad thing. The built-in cooktop, furnace, frig, etc. all use low pressure propane that is regulated it the propane tank.
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Old 08-23-2007, 09:57 PM   #4
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I believe a portable Coleman propane stove uses high pressure and is not meant for use indoors. A high pressure leak inside would be a very bad thing. The built-in cooktop, furnace, frig, etc. all use low pressure propane that is regulated it the propane tank.
Tom Trostel
Actually, the bottle hooks up to a regulator, so the stoves actually use low pressure propane where the line hooks into the stove.

It could be done, the question is would it be worth the hassle of setting it up.
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Old 08-23-2007, 10:41 PM   #5
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Some interesting reading

http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=458141
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Old 08-23-2007, 11:18 PM   #6
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Coleman sells the hose to hook your stove into a 20lb propane tank which is also linked in the article Tom provided, so I don't think that it would be much of an issue to install a cutoff for that hose to use with the stove indoors when needed.
Shouldn't be much of a building project to make a tray that would hold the stove, with a square attached to the bottom of the tray of 1/2" x 1/2" that fits down in the old stove hole and anchors. You could then build just a slightly larger stove cover than the current one and the appearance with the cover on would be the same as it is now. We have yet to use the stove inside, so I doubt you'd even hook it up inside but once in a blue moon. Most of the time I'd take it outside after arriving in camp and use the bottle. Sure would eliminate having to basically transport two propane stoves, one of which we're never using.
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Old 08-24-2007, 03:13 PM   #7
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Yes, this is a common setup for tent trailers, and makes sense to me (one less thing to carry). Those inside/outside stoves are based on a design which is normally built in, not a portable unit.

All stoves do inherently run on low pressure gas, delivered from a regulator which brings the high tank pressure down to a suitably low level. In our trailers, the regulator is mounted by the propane tanks outside; portable stoves have it somewhere between the tank and the control.

The problem with adapting an outdoor stove this way is the the regulator and the control are usually in the same device (in current typical Colemans, the thing with the knob that screws onto the 1-lb cylinder)... there's no way to feed it low pressure propane, because you can't intercept the plumbing between the regulator and the control. Some barbecues (like my Porta-Chef) put the regulator at the tank end of the supply hose, and the control at the appliance end, so a simple hose change lets you set them up for low-pressure supply (such as a quick-connect port on the side of the trailer, like an RV-Q).

While a supply line of high-pressure propane could be plumbed into the trailer interior, I wouldn't do it.

If you can find a portable stove with separate regulator, you're on your way. Otherwise, I would start with the indoor stove, rather than the portable one, to build this system.
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Old 08-24-2007, 06:00 PM   #8
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Brian,

Good info. Question for you if I'm following what you are saying I'm confused on one thing.
Isn't the line to the current permanent stove already low pressure as it is coming off the regulator at the propane tank on the outside. So if one can put the right adapters on this line to attach to the portable stove wouldn't this be one and the same?
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Old 08-24-2007, 06:19 PM   #9
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Here's a thought that would be easy, since the need for the inside stove is minimal.
I found this stainless steel stove with a 2' hose that attaches the bottle.

Century Stove

One could simply hook up the bottle and set it behind the stove when using inside and the same hose and bottle for outside. This would eliminate the need for the permanent line/regulator issues.
Nice looking stove to boot!
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Old 08-24-2007, 07:13 PM   #10
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Quote:
...Isn't the line to the current permanent stove already low pressure as it is coming off the regulator at the propane tank on the outside.
Yes.

Quote:
...So if one can put the right adapters on this line to attach to the portable stove wouldn't this be one and the same?
No, because a typical portable stove "expects" to get high-pressure gas directly (that is, without a regulator between the input fitting and the propane tank). If you feed propane already regulated down to low pressure into the input of a regulator on the stove, I doubt there would be any propane flow.

If you could attach to the plumbing in the stove after the regulator, then yes, it would be like a permanent stove connection.

Quote:
Originally posted by REI.com description of Century Deluxe Stainless-Steel Two-Burner Stove
[b]Includes a 2-ft. hose assembly with regulator that connects to a 16.4-oz. disposable propane cylinder; easily converts to bulk cylinder operation
This linked Century stove looks like a promising find.

A stove with the regulator mounted on the end of the hose, not built into the control or directly coupled with a pipe, would allow the use of a different hose with a low-pressure quick-connect fitting to be substituted, allowing to work with a matching outlet fitting inside the trailer and plumbed to the trailer's regulated supply. To use it outside, the included portable regulator would just be fitted with a quick-connect outlet (like the one in the trailer).

If it really does have a separate regulator, this Century stove is effectively like my Porta-Chef barbecue grill; however, in the photos on the Century Tool & Manufacturing - Propane Stoves web page, it appears that the only real difference is that instead of the usual rigid tube, the connection of propane cylinder to stove is a flexible hose (a nice feature, anyway). Only if that device screwed onto the cylinder is simply a regulator with 11" WC pressure output would this stove be suitable. It might be... I tried to look at the owners manual, but that page at Century seems to broken.
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Old 08-24-2007, 07:17 PM   #11
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One could simply hook up the bottle and set it behind the stove when using inside and the same hose and bottle for outside. This would eliminate the need for the permanent line/regulator issues.
That's the same as using any outdoor stove inside (except that the hose flexibility would allow the cylinder to be less in the way)
  • you need to either use those annoying little disposable cylinders, or bring a high pressure bulk supply into the trailer (neither is good)
  • this is explicitly forbidden by all of the outdoor stove instructions which I have seen
Exactly why are outdoor stove not acceptable inside (even with just a 1-lb cylinder)? I don't know.
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Old 08-24-2007, 07:28 PM   #12
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Only thing I can find so far on that is:

Charcoal and propane will take the oxygen out of your air, and this can be fatal quickly if you use them indoors. The only way you should ever even consider using these indoors is if there is a blizzard outside or you can't get outdoors at all for some reason. And then, you would have to be sure to open every door and window so that the air supply is constantly renewed. Even then use it only as long as necessary for cooking and keep the windows and doors open long afterward to be sure that there is enough oxygen indoors.

But we already have a propane stove in the trailers so
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Old 08-24-2007, 07:30 PM   #13
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Charcoal and propane will take the oxygen out of your air...

But we already have a propane stove in the trailers so
Exactly my thinking!
The problem is presumably with the propane supply (the cylinder in the interior), rather than with the burning of propane.
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Old 08-24-2007, 07:48 PM   #14
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Well, I'd definitely recommend against this procedure.

Blowing up 16oz propane
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