Regulating Trailer Battery - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-25-2009, 05:35 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Trailer: 1985 13 ft Scamp and 1998 20 ft Aljo
Posts: 3
I think my first post did not go, so I will ask my dumb questions again. My 1985 Scamp has neither Converter nor Inverter (nor much of anything else that I can locate). However, the trailer battery does receive a charge from the tow vehicle when connected. I use the trailer battery very little if at all (minimal lights). My questions: On a long trip, is the trailer battery regulated by the tow vehicle? Is there any danger of overcharging it, or affecting the tow vehicle battery in any way? Many thanks in advance. Ron S.
__________________

__________________
Ron S. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2009, 10:01 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Harry Young's Avatar
 
Trailer: 1971 Astro (ie. Campster/Hunter I)
Posts: 437
Send a message via MSN to Harry Young Send a message via Yahoo to Harry Young
Post

Ron,

These are a few thoughts on a subject that has many variations regarding charge needs and the many configurations different equipment may require.

If the tow is wired to charge the battery from the tug alternator its charge regulator will adjust to the needed charge in most cases (check equip. specs for vehicle)...if your wise, you will have in the least a battery isolator in the tug so the tow battery cannot drain the tug...they will charge together and drain separately. Battery isolators need to be matched to the vehicle charge circuit configuration.

Beyond this basic set up there are variations and gadgets aplenty.

If you choose not to use the battery isolator having the tug and tow share the charge circuit that is o.k. not best....but unplug the tow every time you stop any length of time.

In the case of the tow using a deep cycle only battery the advice is not to charge it faster than 10 amp hours...you need a gadget to limit the charge from the tow to that limit.

There are hybrid batteries that are deep cycle/start batteries... they can be charged over the 10 amp deep cycle rating and work around that limit not needing the gadget.

The real reason to consider wiring so the tow and tug share a common charge circuit is this...when the refrigerator is being powered 12v in transit...its 12v draw is significant needing a steady replenishment of charge as it operates.

Or in my case I run the long desert distances running the refrigerator on A/C using my inverter.

90% of the time I use the charge/converter to charge it at home the day before camping and do not worry about it...I run 5 days on battery then run my suburu/robin generator 2 hours and its done for another 5 days.

I prefer to leave the fuse out of the charge circuit thru the tug tow plug unless I really need it.

Others have habits different from mine with good reasons for them, when there are more responses I am sure it will be clearer how you want to do this.

Happy Camping, Safe Trails.

Harry
__________________

__________________
Harry Young is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2009, 03:12 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Roy in TO's Avatar
 
Name: Roy
Trailer: 1972 boler American and 1979 Trillium 4500
Ontario
Posts: 4,954
Quote:
I prefer to leave the fuse out of the charge circuit thru the tug tow plug unless I really need it.
I don't understand your logic. How does one predict when they will need a fuse?
__________________
Roy in TO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2009, 08:29 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Harry Young's Avatar
 
Trailer: 1971 Astro (ie. Campster/Hunter I)
Posts: 437
Send a message via MSN to Harry Young Send a message via Yahoo to Harry Young
Post

The comment was meant to mean that though my tug is wired to charge the tow I rarely use it, unless the trip is very long, or the desert is many miles of hot highway making it a slog that pre-cooling the refrigerator does not work well.

I remove the fuse to the charge circuit disconnecting the charge power to the trailer plug 90% of the time, disconnecting the circuit for use later when I decide to replace the fuse then.

The reason I do this is I feel putting an additional load on the alternator is not worth it unless really needed, I run the A/C allot in the tug and its a power hog too, I also travel with my lights on, I do not want to shorten the cycle life of the expensive alternator by utilizing this axillary charge circuit unless its needed.

The modern solid state voltage regulators in some vehicles of the past were somewhat moody when heated up when nearing their capacity, I have had issues with some made, my feeling is they are rated too high in their stated amps that they claim to handle.

Its a habit I have developed based on my past camping trips, some where I was stuck changing an alternator in the hot boonies...

The comment was stating just a preference to not use the charge circuit unless I wanted too.

I re-read the post after your question and had to smile at myself, I can see where the question entered your head.

I only use the circuit when there is a draw on the battery when in transit...otherwise I choose to charge with the trailer converter which is more sensitive to the state of that particular battery.

Hope this explains it.

Harry


Quote:
I don't understand your logic. How does one predict when they will need a fuse?
__________________
Harry Young is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2009, 10:22 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Trailer: Casita 17 ft Spirit Deluxe
Posts: 509
I am just the opposite of Harry.

I connect the 7-pin connector to the Escalade and never worry about the regulation of either battery. There is no isolator or relay in the Escalade and I never remove the fuse even though the Escalade is quite a current hog.

I have no doubts about the capability of the alternator to support both batterys, which by the way takes very little of the amps produced by the alternator after they are charged.
__________________
CD and Joyce Smith - Lily, Violet, and Rose
1999 Casita 17' SD - "The Little Egg"
2007 Escalade - 6.2L V8 - 6L80E Trans - 3.42 Diff
CD Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2009, 10:37 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Roy in TO's Avatar
 
Name: Roy
Trailer: 1972 boler American and 1979 Trillium 4500
Ontario
Posts: 4,954
Quote:
I remove the fuse to the charge circuit disconnecting the charge power to the trailer plug 90% of the time, disconnecting the circuit for use later when I decide to replace the fuse then.

...

Hope this explains it.
That explains it, my brain was thinking the fuse was a fuse, not recognizing that the precence or abscence of the fuse is in essence a switch.
__________________

__________________
Roy in TO is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
battery


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
1986 17ft Bigfoot trailer propane/battery cover wanted Sandy S Classified Archives 0 09-25-2009 05:34 PM
Hooking up boler battery to Tug battery Andy H Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 3 08-02-2007 01:59 PM
Drain on trailer battery while towing Legacy Posts Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 4 08-22-2003 04:30 PM
Removing trailer battery for winter Legacy Posts Care and Feeding of Molded Fiberglass Trailers 13 12-14-2002 04:48 PM
Trailer Battery. Legacy Posts Modifications, Alterations and Updates 17 11-13-2002 07:12 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:23 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.