Replacing tires - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 08-21-2016, 07:07 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by Joe Romas View Post
Trailer tires don't show much wear.
They will look great up until they disentigrate.
Even thought you can get 5 years out of a set I prefer to replace them at three years buying tires and rims and then selling the used ones on Craig's list. . .
I don't understand replacing rims, unless they are badly rusted or damaged.

/Mr Lynn
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Old 08-21-2016, 07:23 AM   #16
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Just a month ago I had the same type tire failure. The entire tread came off while driving unpaved Route du Nord in Quebec. I was lucky. I happened to be looking in the mirror and saw the nearly-detached tread go round a couple of times before flying off. The casing held air. There was no sound or feeling to indicate failure.

Because I often travel away from civilization I carry two mounted spares for my single-axle trailer and two for my van. A van tire developed a leak on the same road.


I'm thrifty while my wife is safety conscious. I am seeing the wisdom of her ways. I replaced two trailer tires and three van tires in Saguenay, the first town I came to during business hours. Despite the fact that most of the replaced tires still had some life (the leaker could have been patched), I FELT so much better riding on new rubber. How much would I pay to avoid being on the side of a busy road in the dark changing a tire? Or to avoid a hefty towing bill?


Source of that trailer tire failure likely was heat. Turns out I had an intermittently dragging brake due to salt air over the years corroding the moving parts. I believe the brake drum heated the rim which then greatly increased the air pressure.


I
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Old 08-21-2016, 07:38 AM   #17
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I don't understand replacing rims, unless they are badly rusted or damaged.

/Mr Lynn
Just got back a couple weeks ago from Elkhart Indiana center of the universe for everything trailer related where I was able to buy 2 new tires on aluminum rims for $100 each about the price of one tire here in Canada . Pretty much saved enough to pay for gas ,camp ,and a trip to shipshauana and and I'll sell my old (2 year old aluminum rims) for what I payed for the new ones.
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Old 08-21-2016, 09:04 AM   #18
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I don't understand replacing rims, unless they are badly rusted or damaged.

/Mr Lynn
It's easy to sell tires mounted on rims, think plug n play, and difficult to sell tires alone.

At three years rims still look good but not as nice as new ones.

So my rims were $58 but I sold old tires and rims for $90.

Or $32 ahead with new shiny rims and I didn't pay disposal fees on 2 tires.

Not for everyone but it works for me

Another reason is if you want aluminum wheels as many do.

Joe
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Old 08-21-2016, 09:18 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by Borrego Dave View Post
It's good to know the tire dates. I can understand keeping the 2013 tire for a spare but....it's getting close to the end date . If it was me (and I did this) I would buy three new tires. You now have a set start date without having to decode tire dates. Keep the spare covered and rotate the three tires around every year or so to keep the rubber more supple from use. A static unused state is not your friend.
The spare is only three years old... less than half way 'til "Logan's Run"

(Tire dealer's mount tires up to ten years old)

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Old 08-21-2016, 10:56 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by Jacqueline in BC View Post
...
Also, what are some of the reasons for a tire to blow like that? ...
Based on the available information this tire failure is not surprising, and if we knew the full history of the tires it might have been perfectly predictable.

I have developed the below guidelines in an effort to protect myself from such tire failures, and the damage to the camper that usually results. I won’t claim that I follow all of these guidelines all of the time but ideally this is what I would do.

General rules:

1. Know the date your tires were made (date code on tire). Replace when they reach 5-6 years of age or sooner if not well cared for. Note that the date code on mine was on the inside so it is a PIA to read.
2. Use a TPMS (with metal valve stems) to monitor pressure and temperature when traveling.
3. A few days before each outing, fully inflate tires on the trailer and visually inspect all tires and wheels including the deflated spare. Recheck the trailer’s tires pressure and condition prior to departing. Any excessive and unexplained loss of pressure should be investigated before departure.
4. Keep tires covered when trailer is stored or parked, esp. if for more than a few days.
5. Carry a portable inflator and quality pressure gauge (or two, in order to compare readings).
6. Keep wheels and tires clean and keep them away from solvents, gas fumes, chemicals, etc. as well as running motors.
7. Rotate tires when doing annual bearing and brake inspection and maintenance.

The spare:

1. Store indoors in a dark place and /or in sealed plastic bags with as much air as possible removed.
2. When towing put spare on rear mount with tire cover, or better yet, in tow vehicle still in storage bag. In either event, inflate to 10 PSI and only fully inflate when it is put into service.
3. Rotating with trailer’s tires is optional.

Short term storage:

1. If trailer is stored without raising the tires off the ground leave them at max inflation. Some experts recommend overinflating 25% as long as that does not exceed the rating for the rim and then readjusting to normal inflation before traveling.
2. If trailer is temporarily stored but not raised on stands, then move the trailer a couple of feet every 5-10 weeks so the portion in contact with the ground changes (to prevent get flat spots).
3. Remove heavyweight items and empty water and waste tanks to reduce the load on the tires and axle.

Long term storage:

1. Raise the trailer on jack stands until the tires are off the ground. Deflate tires to 10 PSI and cover. If practical, remove the wheels and store them indoors in a dark place and /or in sealed plastic bags with as much air as possible removed.
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Old 08-21-2016, 11:20 AM   #21
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In either event, inflate to 10 PSI and only fully inflate when it is put into service.
Gordon;

I agree completely with almost everything you've listed; however I have not heard the bit about having an under-inflated spare before. Its a given that it needs to be fully inflated upon installation. What is the rationale for this?

Vic
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Old 08-21-2016, 11:40 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by Victor Benz View Post
Gordon;

I agree completely with almost everything you've listed; however I have not heard the bit about having an under-inflated spare before. Its a given that it needs to be fully inflated upon installation. What is the rationale for this?

Vic
To me, its the same as the advice to take the pressure off the main (mounted) tires as recommended by a number of manufactures such as Goodyear (bullet point #4).

But I should add that this recommendation does not seem to be universal and I am open to debate on the question.

I have heard the the higher pressure on the inside causes more rapid oxidation on the inside than if they tires were, for example, unmounted. That however might just be snake oil.


EDIT: Another valid point is that when you have a flat and need to use the spare, you might be in a place where you do not want to wait on your inflator to does its job. So in that case, a fully inflated and ready to go spare would be better.
--end edit--

Also, on the question of just buying new tires already mounted, I would only do that if I could get them with metal valve stems.
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Old 08-21-2016, 12:39 PM   #23
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Then if you have a flat on the tow vehicle, crank the filthy neglected spare down from underneath and scrape the mud, gravel, flake rust etc from it.
( that is if the cable will let it down!
Put the half flat thing on your vehicle (even if it is a minispare) and make your way to the nearest tire service place. (provided you can follow the convoluted jack instructions)
BTW... this is a great time to add a whole new list of words to your vocabulary or to find the limits of your self restraint and attempt to extend them!
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Old 08-21-2016, 02:07 PM   #24
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Then if you have a flat on the tow vehicle, crank the filthy neglected spare down from underneath and scrape the mud, gravel, flake rust etc from it. ( that is if the cable will let it down!
..
Yes, its a great van, but the spare tire mount and placement is atrocious. I'm lucky that I don't have "salted" roads here but still after a few years I might end up carrying both the tug and trailer's spare in the trunk.
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