Rusty? stovetop ... Magic solution? - Fiberglass RV


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Old 06-09-2014, 10:16 AM   #1
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Rusty? stovetop ... Magic solution?

Hi all,

I have a Coleman stovetop from 1980 trillium that was caked and baked... Coming along nicely in terms of cleanup, but now I'm stuck. Any magic solutions? I've tried aluminum foil scrubbing, baking soda.... Where do I stop? What do I coat with (not paint) once I stop cleaning to stop further corrosion...

Btw it's magnetic, whatever metal it is....
Thanks!
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Old 06-09-2014, 06:00 PM   #2
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That looks like stainless steel. You can either do it chemically or mechanically.

Mechanically:

The best thing I've found for removing light surface rust is steel wool. Put it in the sink and try scrubbing it out with an SOS pad. It will take some work, but it should come off. If not, you might try something more aggressive, like a fine grit sandpaper. The great thing about stainless steel is that you can always polish it out if you scuff it up.


Chemically:

If you're looking for a magic solution, there is a rest remover called Metal Rescue. You can buy it at Home Depot for $25 a bottle. I use this for old car parts and it's amazing. It's non toxic, and it will dissolve all of the rust without damaging anything. You want this specific brand. Steer clear of the "rust converter" products that you find in the auto parts store. Those are for treating rust in preparation for paint, and they're totally different. Instead of removing the it, they convert it into this black crust that you can sand and paint. Metal Rescue is the only one I know of that will remove the rust entirely and take it down to bare metal.

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Old 06-09-2014, 06:18 PM   #3
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Errr.. If it's stainless steel, maybe the last thing you will want to clean with is steel wool. That will imbed tiny particles of ferrous metal into the stainless and it will be stainless steel no mo.... In most cases that's what causes rusting of those stainless steel stove parts in the first place.

BUT: You can use a stainless steel wire wheel on a drill motor to clean it IF (big IF) it's never been used on common steel. A brass wire wheel may also help, but the same warning applies.

That said, it may never really stay clean as the ferrous particles that are imbedded may not come out and it will oxidize all over again.

But it may not be stainless steel, it may be nickel plated steel, in which case the plating is long gone and the pitted damage will rust again and again. I would just look for, disposable aluminum foil burner liners and change them often.
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Old 06-09-2014, 06:19 PM   #4
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Great! I will give it a try
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Old 06-09-2014, 06:29 PM   #5
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DO NOT use a wire wheel on a drill. You'll scratch it up so bad, you won't even want it anymore.
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Old 06-09-2014, 06:40 PM   #6
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Hmmmm.... Been doing it that way for years.... The operative words are "Stainless steel" or a "Brass" wire wheel.

Stainless steel and brass wire wheels are fairly soft, a lot softer than steel wool, and you can polish the entire bowl to look smooth. But, if an aged "Patina" (rust) look is more attractive than a brushed surface, stick with the steel wool, it will come back.
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Old 06-09-2014, 06:58 PM   #7
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Don't get me wrong, wire wheels are great for removing rust. If I'm cleaning the diff cover on my old Jeep, I'll use a wire wheel. But it's WAY too aggressive for trim pieces.

Also, I have to call BS on "ferrous particles getting embedded in the steel". Stainless steel is a ferrous metal. It's already 90% iron. That's why magnets stick to it. I've restored 2 classic cars, and steel wool is what everyone recommends for removing surface rust from chrome and stainless steel. It's been 10 years and nothing I've cleaned has re-rusted.
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Old 06-09-2014, 07:13 PM   #8
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Ummm... Among other things, I sell magnetic level indicators that use a magnetic float in a 316 stainless steel chamber. The reason we use stainless steel, is that it is not affected by, or blocks magnetic lines of force.

If a magnet sticks to it, it is no stainless steel I know.

According to this link:
http://www.azom.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=863

There is less then 0.03% Fe in 316 stainless steel.

http://www.azom.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=965

There is less then 0.08% Fe in 304 stainless steel

What grade of stainless has 90% iron?
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Old 06-09-2014, 07:14 PM   #9
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Since the picture posted was of decent quality I opened it full sized. I'm pretty sure I am seeing plated metal bubbling along the edges of the "crud" portions. OP can confirm if the metal really is pitted and peeling. If you can catch a finger nail on the edges around some of the crud when scraping out toward the shiny part probably plated.

Leaves a couple of options for repair that I can think of. Remove the rust as suggested by chemical or mechanical means.

Then either contact a local chrome shop and tell them you only need the nickel base coat not full chrome job. Save some money that way and it may not cost much. OR use a high temp aluminum or chrome (or colored if you like) high temp paint. Typically used for auto engines and exhaust systems.

You will want to bake them if you paint them, best done on an outside grill with clean foil under them and the lid down. It takes heat to cure and set the paint and until it bakes for awhile it will stink from the off gassing every time it gets hot. Couple of hours baking at least maybe more. If the paint has a temp limit don't go over it while baking.
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Old 06-09-2014, 07:15 PM   #10
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Call it what you want but.....
I worked for LogEtronics (Film Processors) and Kodak (graphic arts division) as a trainer and tech rep for about 20 years and many, many times we had to replace $2000 stainless steel film processing tanks because they had been cleaned with steel wool and became rusty tanks. It's a well known problem in the stainless steel manufacturing, processing and refinishing field.

Yes, a wheel will leave brush marks, but that trumps more rust.

BTW: Not all stainless steel is magnetic
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Old 06-09-2014, 07:18 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Tilston View Post
Ummm... I sell magnetic level indicators that use a magnetic float in a 316 stainless steel chamber. The reason we use stainless steel, is that it is not affected by, or blocks magnetic lines of force.

If a magnet sticks to it, it is no stainless steel I know.
316 by definition is non-magnetic, but there are some lower grades of "stainless" that have some magnetic properties.

But it sounds like the OP problem may be with plated steel anyway.
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Old 06-09-2014, 07:22 PM   #12
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Stainless steel and magnetic? Really, both? I use Evapo-Rust from Harbor Freight, cheap, safe and very effective.
1 Quart Evapo-Rustâ„¢ Rust Remover
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Old 06-09-2014, 07:25 PM   #13
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Here's a clip from this link: Many others exist.....

5 Stainless Steel Mistakes Not to Make

Do not use steel wool or steel brushes.
These products leave little particles in the surface of the steel and inevitably these particles begin rusting and staining the surface of the steel. They also can excessively scratch the surface of your stainless steel. Stay completely away from steel wool and steel brushes
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Old 06-09-2014, 07:36 PM   #14
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Thanks for the info Bob. Anyone that has a stainless steel (old) sink, probably has some rust issues due to someone using SOS pads or the like. I tried to mention rust issues and stainless steel sinks on one of the other forums and just about got my head bit off, like I was some know nothing idiot. You can only provide solid information gleaned from reliable sources or actual experience. We can't force people to pay attention and learn. Too bad actually.
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