screwing right into the fiberglass - Fiberglass RV


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Old 07-10-2010, 07:43 PM   #1
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Is there a specific type of screw that you can just screw into fiberglass, and it won't either wreck the fiberglass, or just pull out after a while? I want to put a new flooring into my Boler, and for the moldings that run in the corners, I was thinking of screwing them in. But will the screws just pop out over time. Should I glue them instead? What have other done? Thanks!
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Old 07-10-2010, 08:35 PM   #2
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Is there a specific type of screw that you can just screw into fiberglass, and it won't either wreck the fiberglass, or just pull out after a while? I want to put a new flooring into my Boler, and for the moldings that run in the corners, I was thinking of screwing them in. But will the screws just pop out over time. Should I glue them instead? What have other done? Thanks!
Hi Gord,

I wouldn't recommend screwing right into fiberglass with a self-tapping screw. It just won't work well.

I cant visualize exactly where you are planning to put the fasteners, but if it is right into the floor, that is likely to be cored anyway (fiberglass/wood/fiberglass).

Here is one way, with a variation, depending on your floor and also what your access is and what you are trying to do (which I'm not sure about).

1) If into a cored area, overdrill the hole (say with a 1" or 1-1/4" hole saw), fill the entire hole with thickened epoxy (resin + colloidial silica or other appropriate filler), and then when that has set up you can either re-drill a hole and use a machine/screw and nut, or you can drill and tap and use a machine screw.

This will also "close out" the core and prevent moisture from getting into it, so you gain in two ways.

2) If you are going into just thin fiberglass (no core) then I would glue a backing block on the underside with epoxy resin (I would use a solid fiberglass block) and then you could go ahead with plan #1.

There are other methods, but these two are the most obvious. Can you explain a bit more exactly what you are doing and where you want to put the fasteners?

Raya
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Old 07-10-2010, 08:45 PM   #3
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Its hard to describe, but my plan is to put in that vinyl fake wood flooring that everyone has been raving about. The name escapes me at the moment. But anyway, right now, my floor is just the plain old green fiberglass. No other floor material. I have a 1972 Boler. The floor for the dining area is raised, so in those edges, the inside one and top outside edge, I was going to put a trim similar to what you would do with a raised floor in a house with vinyl etc.

I'm re-reading my answer here, and I don't think I'm making sense , Anyway, do you follow me? If not, I'll try to explain better.
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Old 07-10-2010, 09:02 PM   #4
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Hi Gord,

Okay, well of course all Bolers might not be the same (different eras and factories), but my 1974 also has the green fiberglass floor. There is a core underneath (otherwise if it were just one layer of fiberglass it would be very weak and flexible), and then a bit more fiberglass (just chopped mat I think) on the underside of that. So for fastening into the floor, my suggestions would probably hold true (of course always check beneath before proceeding!)

Now if you are talking about screwing sideways into the vertical "walls" of the sunken main floor, then I think the frame might be right behind that (I have not investigated so not sure how close it is). That is probably not cored (but again, have not checked). If the frame is right there, you might want to glue or otherwise fasten your "baseboard."

Am I on the right track here?

Raya
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Old 07-11-2010, 07:56 AM   #5
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On my Trill 4500 I did just what you are asking.

I installed the interlocking strips of Photgraphed Wood flooring and left a small space all the way around and then I made a simple 1" X 2" clear pine moulding to finish the edge and hide the space.

I used drywall screws with a coarse thread and pre-drilled for them.

It looked good and nothing ever moved or worked loose.

I think there is a big difference between using a screw in fiberglass like this and using them for bearing any load.That I would not do.
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Old 07-11-2010, 12:12 PM   #6
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Thanks guys! My first inkling was to install the Allure flooring (finally remembered the name) all the way to the edges and leave the smallest gap possible. And then glue the trim onto the Allure. This way the floor is still floating. But will the vibration from driving, or walking on it, etc cause the glue to let go?

Other than that, my next thought was to do what Ed described. I didn't realize the floor was that thick, but now that I think about it, that's a no brainer. Especially someone like me, thats 200 lbs, would go right through thin fiberglass!

But Raya, your idea is probably the best, if you fasten it to the fiberglass, but I'd still rather try the glue, just because I can remove the floor and there be no damage, or modifications to it. But if glue is an absolute bad idea, then I won't. Any thoughts?
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Old 07-11-2010, 05:37 PM   #7
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Hi Gord,

I didn't mean to give you the impression that glue was not a good way to go. Actually, I think it would probably be better than fasteners, if what you mean is to attach the "baseboard" to the flooring.

I was responding to your query about whether you could "screw into" fiberglass, and giving you my opinion on that.

Note that the Trillium that Ed was talking about does not have the sunken main floor, so he would not have the potential frame interference screwing into the vertical sides of the sunken floor that you might have in a Boler.

I don't know exactly what Allure is made of, so I can't say what type of glue would hold (but contact cement may be one).

Raya
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Old 07-11-2010, 07:10 PM   #8
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Sorry Raya, your right I didn't ask about glue. I guess after I posted, I must have started to think about using glue. I can't remember, but anyway, I think I'll try glue first, as at the very least I can just pull it all out and start over. The Allure is a vinyl, so I'm sure I can ask the store what to use, or use contact cement, like you suggested.
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Old 07-13-2010, 07:18 PM   #9
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Is there a specific type of screw that you can just screw into fiberglass, and it won't either wreck the fiberglass, or just pull out after a while? I want to put a new flooring into my Boler, and for the moldings that run in the corners, I was thinking of screwing them in. But will the screws just pop out over time. Should I glue them instead? What have other done? Thanks!

Glue the moldings in with PL Premium. You'll need to fabricate a means of holding them in place until the glue sets.
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Old 07-14-2010, 09:33 AM   #10
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PLPremium, that's what I used to glue up some wall board. Seems like good stuff. I'll try that!
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Old 07-18-2010, 11:12 PM   #11
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Its hard to describe, but my plan is to put in that vinyl fake wood flooring that everyone has been raving about. The name escapes me at the moment. But anyway, right now, my floor is just the plain old green fiberglass. No other floor material. I have a 1972 Boler. The floor for the dining area is raised, so in those edges, the inside one and top outside edge, I was going to put a trim similar to what you would do with a raised floor in a house with vinyl etc.

I'm re-reading my answer here, and I don't think I'm making sense , Anyway, do you follow me? If not, I'll try to explain better.

Hi. I am new at this but I am thinking I read that under the raised floor is the water tanks on the bolers. I would hesitate to screw into that floor unless I was sure of the depth and what was under it. I would hate to puncture the water tank.
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