The Window to my Burro leaks - Fiberglass RV


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Old 06-01-2008, 11:53 AM   #1
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Trailer: 1998 17 ft Burro
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we just bought a 17 Ft Burro trailer used The windows leak we thought it was a hole but we patched it up and it still leaks. My husband says that the rain is coming in by hitting the window and sliding down. It has no molding to help the rain not go into the window we can find where to buy some to see if that will work. we are thinking of sealing the whole window to prevent leaking is there another way or is there a place to buy window trim molding to help the window stop leaking. Has anyone else had this problem. We think it is a design flaw.
thanks for your help
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Old 06-01-2008, 03:50 PM   #2
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Name: Per
Trailer: 2000 Burro 17 ft Widebody towed by Touareg TDI
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Casey:

The windows are likely similar to mine, made by Hehr. It would be helpful to know which window(s) are leaking, because the front and rear windows present their own problems.

If the front or rear windows are leaking I need to know if you have gravel shields on them. If you check the outside of the window moldings you will see that they have weep holes in them which must be kept open. I have not had any problems with them but it might be good to open the windows and gently stick a piece of wire through the holes into the channel. The idea is that the windows will have water run down them and get into the channels but the weepholes will drain the water to the outside.

When the windows are open you will of course have leaking inside based on wind direction etc. The front window in mine leans slightly backwards and it is easy for water to drip straight in. My kitchen window seems to be able to stay open without any rain getting in for some reason. The gravel shield hinge bar is an entirely different problem.

I went to Home Depot and got a length of vinyl U-channel which I cut down somewhat on one leg and contact-cemented them above the side windows and the door. Pretty effective and less than $2.

A suggestion: get a strong light, shine it onto the floor underneath the sink. If you see moisture it may have crept under the carpeting. If so lift the carpeting up to check the floor. The likely source is water entering the refrigerator vents. The remedy is a fairly long story, email me.

As usual, the key to longevity of any of these units rests largely on keeping water out. Good luck!
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Old 06-01-2008, 05:42 PM   #3
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Here's another thread with some window suggestions:

http://www.fiberglassrv.com/board/index.ph...731&hl=weed
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Old 12-29-2008, 05:21 PM   #4
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Name: Michael
Trailer: Li'l Hauley
Oklahoma
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Casey:

The windows are likely similar to mine, made by Hehr. It would be helpful to know which window(s) are leaking, because the front and rear windows present their own problems.

If the front or rear windows are leaking I need to know if you have gravel shields on them. If you check the outside of the window moldings you will see that they have weep holes in them which must be kept open. I have not had any problems with them but it might be good to open the windows and gently stick a piece of wire through the holes into the channel. The idea is that the windows will have water run down them and get into the channels but the weepholes will drain the water to the outside.

When the windows are open you will of course have leaking inside based on wind direction etc. The front window in mine leans slightly backwards and it is easy for water to drip straight in. My kitchen window seems to be able to stay open without any rain getting in for some reason. The gravel shield hinge bar is an entirely different problem.

I went to Home Depot and got a length of vinyl U-channel which I cut down somewhat on one leg and contact-cemented them above the side windows and the door. Pretty effective and less than $2.

A suggestion: get a strong light, shine it onto the floor underneath the sink. If you see moisture it may have crept under the carpeting. If so lift the carpeting up to check the floor. The likely source is water entering the refrigerator vents. The remedy is a fairly long story, email me.

As usual, the key to longevity of any of these units rests largely on keeping water out. Good luck!
FGRV comes to the rescue again. Yesterday I went to put sheets on the bed in my Burro and found a disheartening water puddle below the driver's side sliding window. Looking around, I noticed a gap on the vertical pliable gasket thing on the outside. So I tested the window with a water hose and sure enough the water was coming into the channel on the inside of the window and running down the inner wall to the bed area. But when I started reading old posts here to try and find out what people were doing to fix this problem, I found this handy post (a couple of useful threads actually) telling me about the weep holes. Found them, ran a wire into them, and upon water hose retest the channel empties to the outside (if I don't overload it by running a buku of water down the side).

Next I think I'll look for some of that u-channel. I assume it's best to attach it with the open part of the U facing upward, right?
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Old 01-06-2009, 06:05 PM   #5
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Casey:
If the window leaking is a side slider over the bed, then you may have the same problem I had. I tried several times to fix the problem, but finally came to the conclusion that the water was leaking in between the black aluminum frame and the fiberglass on the outside of the trailer. Now I read that the best way fix that was to remove the window entirely and reseal it with butyl rubber. Well, easier said than done on a Burro Widebody. I removed the window frame on the inside, no problem, but the window refused to come out. Supposedly you can run a thin wire behind a window frame to cut through the seal, but that was not going to happen. You can't even get the tip of an Exacto blade in there. I think the geniuses at Burro must have put the window in with some kind of adhesive caulk. At one point I was lying on my back on the bed pushing the window with both feet. No way that window is ever coming out in one piece. So I gave up.

My compromise? I ran a very tiny bead of clear silicone sealer between the fiberglass and the window frame. No more leak. However, this seal doesn't last, and once a year I have to remove the old silicone and re-seal the window.
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Old 01-06-2009, 07:57 PM   #6
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Trailer: 17 ft 1986 Burro
Tennessee
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Casey:
If the window leaking is a side slider over the bed, then you may have the same problem I had. I tried several times to fix the problem, but finally came to the conclusion that the water was leaking in between the black aluminum frame and the fiberglass on the outside of the trailer. Now I read that the best way fix that was to remove the window entirely and reseal it with butyl rubber. Well, easier said than done on a Burro Widebody. I removed the window frame on the inside, no problem, but the window refused to come out. Supposedly you can run a thin wire behind a window frame to cut through the seal, but that was not going to happen. You can't even get the tip of an Exacto blade in there. I think the geniuses at Burro must have put the window in with some kind of adhesive caulk. At one point I was lying on my back on the bed pushing the window with both feet. No way that window is ever coming out in one piece. So I gave up.

My compromise? I ran a very tiny bead of clear silicone sealer between the fiberglass and the window frame. No more leak. However, this seal doesn't last, and once a year I have to remove the old silicone and re-seal the window.
I had to run a putty knife between the window and the fiberglass and yes it wasn't easy but once the window was removed cleaning off the old stuff ( kind of a hard silicone from the 80's) was pretty easy. Since I reinstalled with the butyl rubber no leaks at all.
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Old 01-06-2009, 08:15 PM   #7
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Trailer: Escape 5.0 TA, 2014
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Quote:
My compromise? I ran a very tiny bead of clear silicone sealer between the fiberglass and the window frame. No more leak. However, this seal doesn't last, and once a year I have to remove the old silicone and re-seal the window.
Instead of fighting with silicone on a yearly basis, consider adding rain gutters: RV Gutters, this also available at Camping World, etc.

To cut the through the old caulk, try the garrote method. A piece of fishing line or weed wacker cord tied around two handles, use a back and forth saw motion. Depending on the window size, it may take two people, one on each handle.

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Old 01-07-2009, 08:53 PM   #8
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we just bought a 17 Ft Burro trailer used The windows leak we thought it was a hole but we patched it up and it still leaks. My husband says that the rain is coming in by hitting the window and sliding down. It has no molding to help the rain not go into the window we can find where to buy some to see if that will work. we are thinking of sealing the whole window to prevent leaking is there another way or is there a place to buy window trim molding to help the window stop leaking. Has anyone else had this problem. We think it is a design flaw.
thanks for your help
Hello Casey:

I am a f/g trailer owner (Escape) and a boat owner. There is a product called Captain Tolley's "Creeping crack" for sealing boat windows. It is fantastic. My boat windows do not leak, even in heavy seas. Give it a try.

Ian
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Old 04-22-2011, 07:41 PM   #9
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Name: Trevor
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if anyone out there is looking for the window trim for older burrow campers. IVE FOUND IT! after hours of searching i came across a website that has it. i have been reading many different forums on here of people looking for it and figured i would spread the word
1/8" Glass Glazing Bead H110-754
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Old 04-22-2011, 08:07 PM   #10
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Name: Trevor
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as for resealing your windows. the best way to do it is completely remove your windows, clean off all the old putty tape/ adhesives on your camper and window frame with a putty knife and SOS pads for the alluminum window frame (a little work with the sos pads and your alluminum frame will shine like new. no need for replacing). remove your camper windows from the frames and clean them as well (be carefull not to scratch them). when reinstalling the windows. go buy a tube of polyurithane window sealant. its what they use to put car windows in. lay your window frame on flat ground after it has been cleaned and scrubbed and apply a small bead around the frame where the window sits. (a small bead will do the trick as this stuff is very sticky.) gently set your windows in the frame and lightly press in the edges just enough to where the bead has made good contact with the window. it doesnt have to goo out onto the front of your window all it needs is enought to see a sealed edge around the window. gently flip the window frame and re insert the rubber window molding. (if properly cleaned and set in hot water the shrunken window mold will return to its original size with a little bit of stretching before reapplying. giving it a slight pull it will feel as if there are knuckles popping inside the rubber as it regains its elasticity.) after you have the molding in place take a dry disposable rag, flip over the window and clean along the inside edge where the polyurithane has gooped out on the window with every stroke you will need to use a clean edge to wipe away the excess. let the windows sit for 24 hours before reinstalling onto the camper. use butyl tape instead of putty tape to reseal the windows to the camper. remove excess putty around the edges once tightened in and vuala! your windows will not leak for at LEAST another 20 to 30 years
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