wet floor in bathroom, 13 ft. Scamp - Fiberglass RV


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Old 04-04-2006, 09:58 PM   #1
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I have a 2002 13 ft. Scamp, and we have had lots of rain this winter. The floor in the bathroom is soaking wet. Cannot figure where the moisture comes from. The "bathroom" is basically only the toilet. Windows seem fine. No water in toilet. Must be coming from the outside, but where??? I plan to tarp it tomorrow to prevent rain from coming in. But would rather locate the source. Help!!
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Old 04-05-2006, 08:38 AM   #2
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I thought I had a leak at the window too but it turned out to be the water valve shut-off on the side of the commode. Do you have pressure on the water lines?
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Old 04-05-2006, 09:14 AM   #3
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Garrett,
On our 17' Casita, there is a vent in one corner of the bathroom which goes from the blackwater tank up through the roof. It could be another possible source for a leak.
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Old 04-05-2006, 10:17 AM   #4
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Garrett,
I have had many trailers and motorhomes and one thing I've learned is that where you find water isn't necessarily where it started. You can have a leak around a vent on the top and the water will move between the outer layer and the insulation until it finds a place to get out which might be at the other end of the trailer. Also if the bathroom is up front and you store it with the tongue a little low it would naturally run in that direction. I think Scamp floors are painted with fiberglass so hopefully you can get it up before it causes any damage.
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Old 04-05-2006, 10:34 AM   #5
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Locating a water source is difficult without being there when it rains. I suggest your place towels to absorb the water on the surface. Then add litter of some sort to aborb as much out of the floor as possible. Then, add some powder to the floor, add to areas you think may be the source. Then place more dry towels in the left over areas to absorb the water once it rains again. Don't throw a tarp over it unless you don't plan to find and repair the water source.

After another rain, as soon as you can, go check it out. See if the powder shows a leak stream of some sort. The towels should be wet or damp at least or maybe. If nothing, can you bring the camper home? Use a garden hose to visually check for leaks. Start on the bottom areas and bring the water up. Spend several minutes at the locations with the hose as it take time for the water to run its course through the holes.

Good luck.
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Old 04-05-2006, 01:56 PM   #6
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If you are not planning to use the trailer until summer, I'd tarp it and wait until dry weather comes to sort this out. Even if you do find the leak this time of year, its much easier to do a permanent repair when the unit is dry.

Concerning the holding tank vent; if I had one (I don't) I would vent it through the floor, rather than the roof. I would cut the vent pipe off a couple of feet above the tank, install a "U" and route it back down through the floor and fiberglass off the hole in the top.
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Old 04-05-2006, 02:37 PM   #7
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I don't think the plumbing vent system would work properly if not vented upwards. I could be wrong, of course.

Our B1700 has two vents (one for the kitchen sink, one for the bathroom) and the plastic cover fittings for both were cracked and garbage when we bought the trailer (the only broken part which I knew about). A succession of previous owners had applied layers of various sealing goop - and even replaced the top cap on one with a metal jar lid - rather than spending the one hour and three dollars to properly replace the entire fitting. They probably spent more on goop than I did to fix it properly. Obviously, I did the full replacement, of both vent covers.

Mine were the Ventline in the upper left corner of page 232 the Go-RV catalog (they say they're Ventline #V2049, Go-RV number 62334).

I agree that a plumbing vent stack is a good place to check.
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Old 04-05-2006, 02:48 PM   #8
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What a great response to my problem!! Thanks for all the tips. They all seem reasonable. I will pursue them, weather permitting. Garret
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Old 04-06-2006, 09:32 AM   #9
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Brian I think the venting through the roof is an idea from the housing industry, since it is the most simple minded and expedient.

But if that were the only way, what would one of those aircraft carrier flight decks look like with all the vent pipes needed to support the city below?

It turns out that the vent pipe must vent to atmosphere and must have no 'pockets' where liquid can collect and seal off the venting action.

One reason for venting out of the roof would be to disperse the 'aromas' a little better. There are various methods for treating effluent that should reduce this to an acceptable leve.

I have experimentally installed a composting toilet in our Scamp. It has a powered vent that runs continuously. The vent was intended to be run through the roof, but I've routed it downward through the floor, experimentally. So far it has worked fine. I have asked passers by if they notice any strange smell coming from our Scamp and have only had negative responses, so far.

There have been a few other issues to deal with in this application, since the toilet was designed for a cabin rather than an RV. But the vent has worked just fine.
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Old 04-06-2006, 10:41 AM   #10
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Quote:
Brian I think the venting through the roof is an idea from the housing industry, since it is the most simple minded and expedient.
I believe I have seen photo's of a Scamp with a side bath, which vents the black tank through the side wall, just below the belly band?
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Old 04-06-2006, 02:53 PM   #11
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About where to run the plumbing vent...

The more I think about this, the more convinced I am that Loren is right about the need to avoid pockets where liquid can collect and obstruct gas flow (they would be like extra traps in the wrong place). The main purpose of a plumbing vent is to allow gas which is displaced by liquid flowing in to escape from the system without causing backpressure.

Going out the floor would work if you could do it with only one upside-down "U" in the overall shape, turning down and not back up again. Of course the ground is in the way of doing this in a house and thus only the wall and roof are possible exit points.

The wall vent should then work, as Frederick's Scamp example illustrates, but I certainly wouldn't move an existing vent from roof to sidewall to improve weather sealing. So in the end I would leave it in the roof (and we're not even sure if Garret has a roof plumbing vent) or go all the way to Loren's underfloor idea. Also, the odour issue may not always be as well controlled as with the composting toilet. Even a regular RV holding tank depends on chemical addition - a household vent does have an odour, and I suspect that an otherwise quite acceptable RV vent might as well.

An underfloor vent would need to be arranged so that the highest point of the vent run is high enough to keep tilting, splashing, cornering, and braking from driving liquid out the vent.

Gee, another design feature to incorporate in the ultimate fiberglass travel trailer...
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Old 04-06-2006, 11:33 PM   #12
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I had one of these Lil Stanker power vents on my old Airstream trailer and they work great. They draw very little power and effectively vent all nasty odors outside. I had the roof-cap type but they also have an inline model. I am thinking of of putting one on my 13ft Scamp. I've included their web-site link.

http://www.lslproducts.com/index.html

My Scamp has the front bathroom also. The vent pipe on mine exits out the sidewall of the trailer directly behind the toilet. I noticed that when I washed the trailer a little water came though the vent area. I looked and noticed that the vent pipe just goes to a hole in the wall and is not sealed at all. Check around the window area and how about where the electrical chord or propane pipe enter in the closet? Good Luck


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Old 04-12-2006, 01:04 AM   #13
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Garrett,

I too had water up front in my 13 Scamp this year for the first time. I have no bathroom but rather the large front window and found water had pooled under the couch/bench seat. The window looked fine however looks are deceiving.

I first pulled the carpet strip loose, that is added to cover the corner joints. I then gingerly worked both the carpet and the insulation loose. I found that I had water between the insulation and the outer wall. I deemed this good as the carpet was only wet where it met the floor.

It was still hard to tell where the water from coming from. I have an overhead cabinet so I cut both the carpet and the insulation from one side to the other inside the cabinet. I loosen both and found it to be dry. That told me the leak had to be the front window or the rivets holding the cabinet up or the rivets for the curtain rod, not from over the top.

On recommendation of the local boat shop, I purchased some LEXEL super elastic sealant, found in the local hardware store with the caulking supplies. It comes in both clear and white. I sealed the window band to both the fibreglas and the window itself. I still had a little water which must have simply been some excess that drained, because as of today I have no water.......it's totally dry.

My sealing was definitely tested as when I drove home from the SouthWest Fibreglas Rally in Pahrump, I encounter rain for nearly 8 hours of driving time. In addition, it has rained several days since my arriving back home.

Any way, all of this information is to let you know not to be fooled by the window appearing OK. I know you have a little window but it could still be leaking. Oh, and as you know the insulation and carpeting it glued to the outer wall. That glue is not a 100% coverage so the water can go here and there on it's way down. I'd recommend finding a place where it would not show and make a little slice in the carpeting and insulation to find the water source.
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Old 04-12-2006, 09:56 AM   #14
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Too bad you can't just pressurize it like a tire and soap the outside looking for bubbles to find the leak.
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