Where to put the battery - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 10-10-2006, 10:43 AM   #15
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For no other reason, the battery inside a trailer takes up valuable space that may better better used for something else. Cupboard space for storage always seems to be a valuable commodity in a small trailer.
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Old 10-10-2006, 01:08 PM   #16
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Captain Ron:

You're a boat person, what is the rule conserning lead acid batteries in boats?
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Old 10-10-2006, 10:53 PM   #17
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Don`t know if they still do, but 70`s Chevy Corvettes used to keep the battery in a box in the passenger compartment behind the driver`s seat with a lift up cover and a hose thru the bottom of the case to the outside of the floor pan for ventilation and possible acid leaks.........in my boat the battery was in the engine area at the stern and I would run the fan for about a minute to exhaust any fumes , be they gas or hydrogen, before starting the motor....a friend of mine didn`t do this and blew the rear section of his boat to pieces....luckily no one was seriously hurt.....your choice where you put your battery......mine is on the tongue of the trailer, where it was the best place to put it for me..... .....Benny
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Old 10-10-2006, 11:56 PM   #18
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My old inboard/outboard boat had its battery inside the engine compartment, but as mentioned, there was a blower to clear fumes (primarily gasoline fumes) -- I don't know what current boat standards are.

I believe current RVIA and automotive standards call for hydrogen-producing batteries to be stored in a vented area.

It's not really the normal battery that produces large quantities of H2, but a battery being heavily charged or overcharged -- Still, unlike a Volkswagon (example often brought up), the battery inside is not sharing space with open flames from a range.

I doubt that there will be many examples of exploding batteries mounted inside RVs because the vast majority of them are either outside, in vented boxes sealed off from the inside or don't produce H2.

My cousin's ex-husband works as a claims investigator for an insurance company and he said exploding automotive batteries are quite common in automobiles, usually during jumpstarting... Personally, I prefer to keep acids and the possibility of explosion outside in the plastic box.

A friend's Jaguar has the battery mounted in the trunk (why they put the battery as far from its heaviest drain {starting} as possible I don't know) but the battery is special and has a vent tube leading thru the floor -- Likewise, Volvo mounts the same style battery in the trunk.
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Old 10-11-2006, 10:03 AM   #19
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I'm with Pete on keeping the battery outside. I had a neighbor kid with VW bus. He came home one afternoon, got out of his bus and before he got to the door the battery exploded. One crispy crittered VW resulted. I know it doesn't happen that often, but why tempt fate in this case?
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Old 10-11-2006, 12:10 PM   #20
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My suggestion is to go with a small propane tank. I recently went with the smaller size. I am saving lots of weight and space. New one is 8 in. in diameter and 12 1/2 in. high.
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Old 10-11-2006, 12:54 PM   #21
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Quote:
...A friend's Jaguar has the battery mounted in the trunk (why they put the battery as far from its heaviest drain {starting} as possible I don't know) but the battery is special and has a vent tube leading thru the floor -- Likewise, Volvo mounts the same style battery in the trunk.
Examples of cars with batteries mounted under the rear seat or in the trunk area are plentiful. They are usually not North American, and are often sports cars or sporty sedans. This location may be chosen due to a lack of space in the engine compartment, high engine compartment temperatures, or to control weight distribution. While the high temperature issue would not apply to a trailer, the other factors may well apply.

Many years ago I had a Datsun which was prepared for competition. As a rear-wheel-drive car with a front-mounted engine, it would benefit from a more rearward distribution of mass, so I mounted the battery in the trunk, in a box, with decently thick welding cable to the starter. It did help handling, and I had no starting problem, but like every design decision I realize that this was a compromise between many factors, some of which have been addressed in this discussion.
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Old 10-11-2006, 07:22 PM   #22
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On my 13' boler i put battery on tong

I weld 2 angles on frame a i fix an alluminium checker plate

I put battery and propan tank side by side




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Old 10-18-2006, 06:08 AM   #23
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On my 1980 13' Boler I kept a regular 20# tank in it original positing just slid back on the tray toward the camper and added a full size deep cycle battery to the tongue infront of this, welding a tray right to the frame and putting the vented box in tray. It is tight but there is room.
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Old 10-18-2006, 06:37 AM   #24
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Quote:
On my 1980 13' Boler I kept a regular 20# tank in it original positing just slid back on the tray toward the camper and added a full size deep cycle battery to the tongue infront of this, welding a tray right to the frame and putting the vented box in tray. It is tight but there is room.
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Hi: For our '77 Boler I had my friendly R.V. dealer weld a frame for the battery and he moved the gas bottle slightly side ways and the battery and bottle can sit side by side...Extra tongue wt. helps to level the trailer/tug position for the road!!! Alf S. North shore of Lake Erie P.S. I don't know how the R.V. dealer survived B/4 My Brother and I each bought Bolers???
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Old 10-18-2006, 09:53 AM   #25
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FWIW... mine is inside, under the sink, under a false floor in the cabinet. It's not officially vented, but gets passive ventilation from other openings in the structure, like cubbies and fridge vents etc.

The only problem I have with it is Fred. He has to lift it out from an awkward position if needed.

(Yeah, I save all my heavy stuff for him LOL!)

It stays there all winter, I have been inside with it charging and notice no funny smells.. from the battery anyway...

from the dogs, that's another story..
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Old 10-19-2006, 12:53 AM   #26
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Quote:
with decently thick welding cable to the starter.
BTW, did you know that welding cable has no particular electrical advantage over large stranded or solid wire in direct current applications? It's a common myth (I believed it for a long while, myself) that current flows only thru the outer portion of the conductor, so multiple strands are supposed to have less resistance than a single, large conductor (Known as Skin Effect). Tain't so for direct current; the resistance is the resistance of the cross-sectional area multiplied by the number of conductors and the shape means nothing (Major DC power in telephone company switchrooms use rectangular copper bar).

Where skin effect does happen is when the current is pulsating or alternating, and the effect is a function of how quickly the pulse/alternation is happening -- The effect is very strong, for example, at radio frequencies.

A friend of mine once replaced his electric winch cable on his boat trailer with welding cable and reported more power -- I now realize that he likely got more power because he had new cable and new connections...
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Old 10-19-2006, 01:23 PM   #27
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The cable I used was billed as "welding cable" because that was the intended application, but I only chose it because it was the least expensive cable which was
  • of the appropriate wire gauge
  • sufficiently insulated with insulation which is appropriate for exposure to outdoor temperatures
  • adequately flexible to route through the car
  • available
The same factors would apply for the trailer. I agree that it doesn't matter if the cable is specifically "welding" cable, because Pete is exactly correct in his analysis, but here in the land of heavy-duty fabrication, welding cable is a common commodity.

I find the part about "skin effect" really amusing. This reminds me of my favourite scam, Monster Cable: people spend ridiculous amounts of money for speaker wire from audio stores, marketed with all sorts of indefensible claims, and the electrons can't tell. But hey, if clear insulation makes you feel better about your wires, go for it!
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